All posts by Maria Coder

native american food

 

Native American food is becoming increasingly more popular in the U.S. Come savor indigenous food in Oregon at these authentic spots.

Head to the Native American-owned Brigham Fish Market for freshly caught Columbia River salmon as well as hot chowder, fish ‘n’ chips, and much more. The Brigham sisters are members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, and come from a fishing family. Get your food to go or eat at a nearby picnic table overlooking the river. 681 Wa Na Pa St in Cascade Locks.

For berry interesting coffee, visit Bison Coffeehouse. This is Portland’s only Native-owned coffee shop. It serves many homemade berry-baked goods, even coffee a la huckleberry mocha latte. 3941 NE Cully Blvd in Portland.

Pop by Salmon King Fisheries, a Warm Springs-based company owned by Tribal Members of The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon and The Nez Perce Tribe, that harvests and processes its own salmon and meats. You may also place an order online. 3240 Walsey Lane, Suite #2 in Warm Springs.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

Let us know which of the Native American food was your absolute favorite!

food cart pods portland

 

Pull up a seat and explore our famous food cart pods Portland!

While these must-see eateries are largely on wheels, thees mobile food trucks tend to stay put, grouped together in pods. And there are pods of all sizes throughout Portland. Here are some of our favorite food trucks in Portland. Stay at The Fulton House!

Hawthorne Asylum
1080 SE Madison St
20+ food carts, large fire pit and plenty of sangria.

Killingsworth Station
1331 N. Killingsworth St
International offerings abound from Salvadorian and Oaxacan carts, to latkes, pierogis, and Southern offerings.

The Lot @ John’s Marketplace
3535 SW Multnomah Blvd – 3560 SE Powell Blvd
Smartly situated next to John’s Marketplace, one of Portland’s largest bottle shops, this food cart pod has everything from slow-cooked BBQ to fried chicken sandwiches and mini cakes.

Piknik Park Food Cart Pod
1122 SE Tacoma St
Comfort foods, Moroccan cuisine, and Nepalese foods are just some of the many tasty options. There’s a craft beer garden too!

Portland Mercado
7238 SE Foster Rd
Mexican, Peruvian, Colombian, and más, this is a must-stop for all who love Latin American cuisine. Grocery store and coffee shop included.

Prost! Marketplace
4237 N Mississippi Ave
Set on the trendy and walkable North Mississippi Avenue, food selection here ranges from vegan bowls to Korean-style tacos. The pod is anchored by German pub Prost!


Food Cart Pods Portland – Popular Questions

How many food cart pods are there in Portland?
Portland has more than 500 food carts at any given time. Most of the carts are organized into groups, or pods, and share an area with several other food carts. While the carts are largely on wheels, they tend to stay in the same pod location.

What city has the most food trucks?
Portland, Oregon, has the most food trucks!

How can I search food cart items in Portland?
You can search many Portland food cart items (though not all) using this Portland food cart finder tool. It boasts about 200 food cart trucks in Portland and allows you to search by cuisine, trademark dishes, and dietary needs.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

Let us know which of the food cart pods Portland was your favorite!

oregon movie locations

Move over Hollywood, in Oregon movie locations abound!

If you love movies, you’ll love visiting these must-see movie spots across Oregon! If you’re wondering what movies were filmed in Oregon, we have a wealth of information. Below are some highlights.

More than 450 movies and TV projects have been shot over the past several decades in the state, according to TravelOregon. So, be sure to make time for The Oregon Film Trail and the Oregon Film Museum! On the museum’s website you can search a list of featured movies filmed in Oregon, a movie map, and much more. If you want to see movies and shows currently in production in Oregon, click here. If you were more interested in watching movies and shows about Oregon, click here.

These are some of the top movies filmed in Oregon:

Wild
Wild is a drama based on the 2012 bestselling memoir Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail, written by Oregonian Cheryl Strayed. While Wild has story lines in California, Minnesota, and Oregon, all but seven of the movie’s scenes were filmed in Oregon.

Wander Mount Hood and you might just spot the location from the film’s famous boot drop; not the actual boot of course, as someone already found that! Danner, a shoe factory in Portland, made countless pairs of the infamous boots for the movie (since Reese Witherspoon, who played Cheryl, had to record a scene where she tosses a boot several times). Here’s where you can snag a pair of the boots for yourself. Make sure to visit these nine iconic film locations. Here’s an article from The New York Times where a reporter tackles parts of the trek. Stay at: Brookside Bed & Breakfast and Old Parkdale Inn.

The Goonies
Hey, you guys! RememberThe Goonies? The movie about a group of misfits that discover an ancient map and set out on an adventure to find a long-lost treasure was a staple of childhood for many. It also launched the careers of Sean Astin, Josh Brolin and Jeff Cohen. The movie was largely filmed in Astoria, with scenic shots from other coastal towns, like Cannon Beach. See the actual beach seen in the flick or climb your way to the cliff where the Goonies pull up on their bikes at Ecola State Park, and more! Roadtrippers.com has a whole trip route for movie buffs, take a look.  Stay at Cannon Beach Hotel.

Stand By Me
This movie starring Wil Wheaton, Corey Feldman, Jerry O’Connell and the late River Phoenix is about a writer retelling his childhood journey with friends to find the body of a missing boy. It was a humongous hit in the ’80s. Parts of Stand By Me were filmed in Brownsville, which stood in for the fictional town of Castle Rock. The town has several plaques to mark movie locations for photo opps. In fact, Brownsville holds a yearly festival each year in the film’s honor. Plus, July 23, 2021, there will be a special 35th anniversary celebration, visit the Linn County Historical Museum website for details. Stay at C’est la Vie Inn.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
The Academy Award-winning One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest where a criminal (Jack Nicholson) pleads insanity and is admitted to a mental institution and causes a stir, was filmed almost entirely on location in Salem, at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem and included active participation of hospital patients and staff. Now known as the Oregon State Hospital Museum of Mental Health, several rooms of the old hospital have been preserved and converted into a museum. Stay at: MaMere’s Bed and Breakfast and Airlie Farm.

National Lampoon’s Animal House
One of the most successful comedies of all time, National Lampoon’s Animal House, was filmed at the University of Oregon in Eugene in 1977. The movie launched the career of the late John Belushi and told the story about college fraternity misfits who battle with their dean and a rival fraternity to keep their spot on campus. Two fraternities also agreed to allow their buildings to be in the film. The city of Cottage Grove, about 20-miles south of Eugene, even closed down Main Street for three days to film the homecoming parade scene. While the location known as Delta House was torn down in the late 80s and replaced by another building but a plaque near the sidewalk marks the site. The other two locations on 11th Avenue still stand and are incredibly popular among fans. Today, the film has is part of the university’s culture and movie locations are highlighted on campus tours. Stay at C’est la Vie Inn.

Want to make a cameo appearance at a local movie spot? Ask your innkeeper for more Oregon film locations.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

Let us know which Oregon movie location was the most as you remembered it from the Big Screen!

oregon scenic bikeways

Oregon scenic bikeways are THE place for avid cyclists!

Did you know Oregon has the ONLY Scenic Bikeway program in the United States? We have 17 scenic bikeways in Oregon! Get ready to ride across desert highways, pedal past geological wonders, and marvel at the sea.

Listed first are the bikeways closest to our B&Bs. After, you’ll find the other bikeways, as well as info on the famed Oregon Timber Trail and the Oregon Coast Bike Route. Ask your innkeeper for insider details.

[Click here to have a FREE limited edition map on The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. Or click here to see the map now online.]

Covered Bridges Scenic Bikeway: This family-friendly 36-mile Oregon bicycle loop leads to several covered bridges, including Chambers Bridge, a historic railroad bridge; Cottage Grove, a historic downtown district; and a bike/walk-only path along the north side of Dorena Lake. Stay at C’est la Vie Inn.

  • See info SPECIFIC to Covered Bridges Scenic Bikeway here.
  • Get the Covered Bridges Bikeway map & cue sheet.
  • View the Covered Bridges Bikeway on RideWithGPS.com.
  • Download the Oregon Scenic Bikeway map here.

Painted Hills Scenic Bikeway: For days of jaw-dropping landscape and jam-packed adventure, nothing beats the geologic splendor, fossil beds, and many varied routes on this 161-mile loop (loop and out and back options). Stay at Wilson Ranches Retreat B&B.

  • See info SPECIFIC to the Painted Hills Scenic Bikeway here.
  • Get the Painted Hills Bikeway map and cue sheet.
  • View the Painted Hills Bikeway on RideWithGPS.com.
  • Download the Oregon Scenic Bikeway map here.

Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway: Bike past vineyards, dairy farms, and more as you take in the views of the Tualatin River on this moderate 51-mile course that’s very popular with foodies. Stay at The Fulton House.

  • See info SPECIFIC to the Tualatin Valley Scenic Bikeway here.
  • Get the Tualatin Valley Bikeway map and cue sheet.
  • View the Tualatin Valley Bikeway on RideWithGPS.com.
  • Download the Oregon Scenic Bikeway map here.

Wild Rivers Coast Scenic Bikeway: Nestled in the fishing hamlet of Port Orford, the oldest town on the Oregon Coast, this moderate, 61-mile, route lets you finish your trek in a day or break it up into several out-and-back rides. Stay at WildSpring Guest Habitat.

  • See info SPECIFIC to the Wild Rivers Coast Bikeway here.
  • Get the Wild Rivers Coast Bikeway map and cue sheet.
  • View the Wild Rivers Coast Bikeway on RideWithGPS.com.
  • Download the Oregon Scenic Bikeway map here.

Willamette Valley Scenic Bikeway: Make your own history by cycling the first official Scenic Bikeway in the United States! This 134-mile, one-way, course takes you past vineyards and through quaint towns as you trace the Willamette River. Stay at: Airlie Farm, A’Tuscan Estate, Bella Collina Bed & Breakfast, The Carlton Inn Bed & Breakfast, C’est la Vie Inn, Chehalem Ridge Bed & Breakfast, Franziska Haus B&B, La Bastide Bed and Breakfast, MaMere’s Bed and Breakfast, R.R. Thompson House, The Setting Inn – Willamette Valley, The Willows Bed & Breakfast, Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast, and Youngberg Hill Vineyards & Inn.

  • See info SPECIFIC to the Willamette Valley Bikeway here.
  • Get the Willamette Valley Bikeway map and cue sheet.
  • View the Willamette Valley Bikeway on RideWithGPS.com.
  • Download the Oregon Scenic Bikeway map here.

[Click here to have a FREE limited edition map on The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. Or click here to see the map now online.]

To view more Oregon scenic bikeways visit TravelOregon.com.

Click here for an Oregon scenic bikeways map with all 17 bike routes. For more information on mountain biking in Oregon, click here. You’ll find information on Oregon mountain biking rides in Bend, Ashland, Oakridge, Baker City/La Grande and Mt. Hood.

More seasoned bikers who’d like to experience Oregon by bike from top to bottom? Take the 669-mile Oregon Timber Trail through the Cascade mountain range. Stay at Prospect Historic Hotel Bed & Breakfast Inn – Motel and Dinner House. The trail has organized its rider resources into three sections: Mountain Bike rides, Tier Loops, and Long Distance. Below is information on each.

Best mountain bike rides on the Oregon Timber Trail (aka best MTB rides on the Oregon Timber Trail):

Rides in the Fremont Tier 
Rides in the Willamette Tier
Rides in the Deschutes
Rides in the Hood Tier 

Best Tier Loops on the Oregon Timber Trail:

Fremont Tier 
Willamette Tier
Hood Tier

Best Long Distance on the Oregon Timber Trail:

Gateway Communities
Fremont Tier
Willamette Tier
Deschutes Tier
Hood Tier

If you’d rather bike along the coast, pedal 370-miles along sweeping vistas on the Oregon Coast Bike Route. To see the official Oregon Department Of Transportation map of the Coast Route, click here.


Oregon Biking Resources

Traveling to Oregon with bike? Travel Oregon has detailed information, whether you’re arriving via train or plane. The tourism commission also has information on Oregon bike concierge services, shipping a bike to Oregon, shuttle companies, and public transit. As well as a huge list of Oregon bicycling maps and Oregon guide books by region.

You can also learn all about Oregon bike shops, cool programs like Portland by Cycle where you can explore urban neighborhoods on guided bike tours, or take part on a bike race, regardless of your skill level, through the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

We look forward to seeing you on one of the Oregon scenic bikeways soon!

oregon food trails

There are nine Oregon food trails and several Oregon food loops that serve local fare with scenery on every side.

All the growers and crafters along these trails are committed to sustainable practices and supporting the agricultural legacy of their regions. So, go ahead — eat your heart out!

Here are the nine food trails in Oregon listed alphabetically:

  • Central Coast Food Trail
  • East Gorge Food Trail
  • Great Oaks Food Trail
  • Great Umpqua Food Trail
  • Mid-Willamette Valley Food Trail
  • North Coast Food Trail
  • Rogue Valley Food Trail
  • South Willamette Valley Food Trail
  • Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail

Below you’ll find information on each regional food trail, as well as links to their websites, Oregon food trail maps, print-at-home brochures, and Oregon food trail itineraries.

[Click here to have a FREE limited edition map on The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. Or click here to see the map now online.]

Central Coast Food Trail: This is the newest addition to the Oregon Food Trails! It showcases locally sourced seafood, wild-foraged ingredients, small farms and ranches, and artisan experiences. Stay at: Baywood Shores Bed & Breakfast and Brey House Ocean View Bed & Breakfast Inn.

East Gorge Food Trail: This trail boasts many family-owned farms and family experiences, like orchard u-pick, canneries, and farm-to-table dining. You’ll also find crafted cider, beer, and wine on your route. You can also enjoy this trail car free! Stay at: Brookside Bed and Breakfast.

Great Oaks Food Trail: Once the nation’s largest hop-producing county, you can still see hops growing on this self-guided culinary journey through many quaint towns within the Willamette Valley. Stay at: MaMere’s Bed and Breakfast and Airlie Farm. Get the printable Great Oaks Food Trail brochure. Before you go, check out these Great Oak Food Trail itineraries!

Great Umpqua Food Trail: Forty-five stops filled with epicurean delights make up the Great Umpqua, with no shortage of wineries, breweries, u-pick farms, cafes, and more. Stay at: C.H. Bailey House. Get the printable Great Umpqua Food Trail brochure. Before you go, check out these Great Umpqua Food Trail itineraries!

Mid-Willamette Valley Food Trail: This trail leads to historic farms that grow fresh produce, hops, grapes, and more — even the wool used in clothes. Get the printable Mid-Willamette Valley Food Trail brochure. Stay at Airlie Farm and MaMere’s Guest House.

North Coast Food Trail: There are 80 stops to savor the bounty on Oregon’s North Coast on this trail. From breweries and wineries to farmer’s markets, bakeries, and more… your next farm-to-table meal is around the corner. Stay at: Thyme & Tide, turtlejanes bed & breakfast and Cannon Beach Hotel. Get the printable North Coast Food Trail brochure. There’s also a North Coast Food Trail map you may print and use right now.

Rouge Valley Food Trail: A self-guided adventure to farms, artisans and restaurants in Southern Oregon. This region grows more than 70 varieties of grapes! Stay at: Prospect Historic Hotel-Motel & Dinner House. Get the printable Rogue Valley Food Trail brochure.

South Willamette Valley Food Trail: This trail includes more than 50 stops, including valley grazing and family-friendly farms, as well as world-class wine. Get the printable South Willamette Valley Food Trail brochure.

Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail: Berries and bagels and more — much more! There are 43 stops to tempt your tastebuds along Oregon’s Wild Rivers Coast. Stay at: WildSpring Guest Habitat. Get the printable Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail brochure. Before you go, check out these Wild Rivers Coast Food Trail itineraries!

Must-See Oregon Food Loops

Hood River Fruit Loop: This scenic 35-mile drive takes you through the Hood River Valley past more than two dozen stands offering wines, ciders, fruits, veggies, and more. Stay at: Brookside Bed & Breakfast and Old Parkdale Inn. Get the printable Hood River Fruit Loop map.

Union County Farm Loop: This 55-mile loop which stretches from La Grande to Union, covers 500-acres of orchards, plus farms, ranches and more. Stay at Bronze Antler Bed & Breakfast; particularly if you’re en route to fishing for trophy-sized fish in Joseph. Get the printable Union County Farm Loop brochure.

River to Hills Farm Loop: Follow segments of the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail and the Oregon Trail between Boardman and Pendleton on this 60-mile loop. You’ll pass farms, kid-friendly museums, secret gardens, fields of lavender, and tasty Oregon-made treats. Stay at Wilson Ranches Retreat B&B. Get the printable River to Hills Farm Loop brochure.

Marion Farm Loop: This route spans from Donald to Jefferson and has 24 different stops, from family-owned farm markets to gardens and wineries. Stay at: Chehalem Ridge B&B, The DreamGiver’s Inn, The Setting Inn – Willamette Valley, The Willows Bed and Breakfast, and Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfast. Get the printable Marion Farm Loop map.

Yamhill Farm Loop: This is the newest loop! Pass vineyards, nurseries, pick up hyper-local natural foods, and more. Stay at: A’Tuscan Estate, Youngberg Hill Vineyards & Inn, The Carlton Inn Bed and Breakfast, R.R. Thompson House, Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast, Franziska Haus Bed & Breakfast, and La Bastide Bed and Breakfast.

The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

Let us know which of the food cart pods Portland was your favorite!

oregon wine country

Oregon wine country is truly spectacular in scenery and in wine.

Oregon’s cooler climate is responsible for its signature grape – Pinot Noir, but there are more than 700 wineries, 1,000+ vineyards and 70+ varieties of grapes in all. Come stay near our vineyards and choose your favorite.

American Viticultural Area, or AVA, is a specific vineyard zone based on geology, geography and climate. AVA info is used on wine labels to help distinguish wines quickly. There are many AVAs in Oregon. Here are the AVA regions and sub-regions closest to our inns. Share your wine preferences with your innkeeper for a personalized recommendation.

Oregon AVAs:

WILLAMETTE VALLEY AVA

This is Oregon’s biggest wine growing region and produces two-thirds of the state’s wine production.
Learn more about Willamette Valley wines here.
Get a Willamette Valley AVA touring guide pdf.
Explore the Willamette Valley AVA wine clubs.
Stay at: The Fulton House and C’est La Vie

SOUTHERN OREGON AVA

Less than 7,000 acres of grapes are divvied up between dozens of varieties, with Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Syrah, Tempranillo, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Riesling among the most popular. Learn more about Southern Oregon wines here.

COLUMBIA GORGE AVA

The Columbia Gorge AVA straddles Northern Oregon and Southern Washington. It’s separated by the Columbia River, which is the only sea-level passage through the Cascade Mountain Range. The most common varieties here include: Gewurztraminer, Pinot Gris, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Riesling, and Chardonnay. Learn more about Columbia Gorge wines here.
Stay at: Old Parkdale Inn and Brookside Bed & Breakfast

Ask your innkeeper about the best upcoming winery events and tastings.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

 

Let us know which of the wines from Oregon wine country is your favorite!

oregon trail game online

The Oregon Trail game online continues to educate and entertain people to this day!

The iconic Oregon Trail game from the ‘70s taught kids about the life of a 19th century pioneer on the Oregon Trail. Do you remember playing the role of wagon leader and guiding your group of settlers along the Oregon Trail? Go to VisitOregon online and click on the first game image to launch The Oregon Trail game and play it online now!

Here’s a video of someone playing the Oregon Trail game.

History of The Oregon Trail Game


The Oregon Trail is an older, very popular computer game that was developed by Bill Heinemann, Don Rawitsch, and Paul Dillenberger back in 1971. It was then put out on the market in 1974 by MECC. The game is simple and was created to teach school children about the life of a 19th century pioneer on the Oregon Trail. You get to play the role of a wagon leader and guide your group of chosen settlers from Independence, Missouri, to the Willamette Valley in Oregon while traveling along the Oregon Trail in 1848. The game has since been released multiple time on multiple platforms by various game makers and publishers who acquired the rights.

The Oregon Trail is a game that was created by Bill Heinemann, Don Rawitsch, and Paul Dillenberger in 1971. In 1974 it went to market by MECC (the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium; later Corporation).

The Oregon Trail is a simple game. It was developed to teach kids in school about the life of a 19th century pioneer on the Oregon Trail. In the game, you’re assigned the role of wagon leader and it’s your job to guide your group of settlers from Independence, Missouri to the Willamette Valley in Oregon. The idea is you’re making the treacherous trek back in 1848. The game became incredibly popular and has since been released many times on many different platforms by many different publishers who over the years acquired the right to the game.

While The Oregon Trail became the most famous of the games, though MECC also created: The Yukon Trail, Number Munchers, Storybook Weaver, The Secret Island of Dr. Quandary, Lemonade Stand, Word Munchers, and DinoPark Tycoon.

And MECC took the production of these games very, very, seriously. All of their games had to do four things, according to an interview the creators granted to Smithsonian Magazine:
1. The information in their games had to historically accurate.
2. The learning had to be woven throughout a game, it could not be parsed out.
3. Each game had to include detailed documentation for teachers to use in class.
4. The games had to be fun!


Questions About the Oregon Trail Game

Can you play Oregon Trail online for free?
Yes, you can play the Oregon Trail game online for FREE! The game runs on your web browser, so you won’t even need to download anything!

Where can I play the Oregon Trail game?
You can play the Oregon Trail game for free here.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.


PS – Best of luck as you play the iconic The Oregon Trail game online!

oregon trail

The Oregon Trail and Native Heritage are woven into Oregon history in many varied ways.

The Oregon Trail History

The Oregon Trail was a 2,170-mile, large-wheeled wagon route, from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon City, Oregon, used by hundreds of thousands of American pioneers to emigrate west in in the mid-1800s. The trail was filled with peril – potential accidents, ailments, and steep climbs, and crossing through Indian territories – but it paved the way for the United States to expand to the west.

Contrary to popular Hollywood depictions, most Indians were tolerant, helpful even, of the pioneer wagons that drove through their lands, at least initially. Over time, relationships between the Indians and pioneers deteriorated. The passing of the Oregon Donation Land Act, encouraged settlement into the area in 1850. Slowly relations improved. Today Interstate 84 passes through towns originally established to serve those using the Oregon Trail. There are currently nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon: Burns Paiute of Harney County; Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians; Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde; Confederated Tribes of Siletz; Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Reservation; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians; Coquille Indian Tribe; and Klamath Tribes.

To learn more about Oregon’s native heritage of the land, check out:

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, located on the Umatilla Reservation, about 15-minutes from Pendleton, is the only tribal-run museum that highlights the history and culture of Native Americans along the Oregon Trail. While there, visit the Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts – it’s the only fine-print studio on a reservation.

The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. The outdoor wagon encampment, trails and access to the historic ruts are open daily. Located five miles east of Baker City, on Highway 86, Exit 302 from Interstate 84, 125 miles northwest of Boise, 95 miles southeast of Pendleton.

The Museum at Warm Springs houses a large collection of North American Indian artifacts. 2189 US-26 in Warm Springs.

Chachalu Museum and Cultural Center tells the story of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde — the community, Tribe, and culture that has persisted despite the challenges. 9615 Grand Ronde Road
In Grand Ronde.

The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art at the Portland Art Museum has a Native American art collection with 3,500 prehistoric and historic objects created by some 200 cultural groups from throughout North America. 1219 SW Park Avenue in Portland.


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

* indicates required









NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

We look forward to seeing you on the Oregon Trail!

oregon waterfalls

Come feel the mist of Oregon waterfalls on your face!

Oregon has more than 238 waterfalls across the state (and 1,000+ according to the Northwest Waterfalls Survey).You basically can’t drive more than 30-minutes without passing another waterfall! The Columbia River Gorge has close to 50 notable waterfalls alone… so where should you go? We’ve come up with a list of 66 must-see waterfalls (it’s really more like 80 since we grouped some together).

Here’s our list of must-see Oregon waterfalls by region. Beside each waterfall you’ll see a number. That’s the number we’ve assigned to the waterfall on our humongous The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls map. If you haven’t sent in your request to receive a free map, fill out this form below and we’ll mail one to you (in the mail, with a stamp — free to you). If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

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OREGON CASCADE WATERFALLS
Ramona Falls (W17): This shaded waterfall is in a forest along the Pacific Crest Trail on the upper Sandy River — on the west side of Mount Hood. The falls are about 120 feet tall, consisting of a wall of cascades. Click to learn more about Ramona Falls. Thinking of hiking there? Check out how these bloggers went about their trek.

oregon cascade waterfalls

Tamanawas Falls (W18): Bring your binoculars and prepare to see a lot of birds and a stunning waterfall! The falls are AMAZING at 100 feet high and 40 feet wide. The trailhead footbridge is the midpoint of a 8-mile stretch of the East Fork of the Hood River hosting nesting Harlequin Ducks. Belted Kingfisher are common but it’s the songbirds you’re likely to remember long after they’ve sung their tunes.

Little Zig Zag River Falls (W19): One of Oregon’s hidden gems. A picturesque stream leads to a photogenic waterfall on this family-friendly trail; complete with a picnic table at the very start. It couldn’t be more perfect. If you go, read this first.

Yocum Falls (W20): This waterfall is right in the heart of the Mount Hood National Forest. It sits in Zigzag canyon with many waterfalls, including Little Zigzag River Falls and Ramona Falls. Want to hike there? Here’s how this couple did it.

Pencil Falls (W21): This glacier-fed waterfall is in the alpine area of Mount Hood Meadows. A small path leads to a great viewing.

Upper Heather Canyon Falls (W22): Where the Timberline Trail crosses Heather Creek, is thought to be one of the most scenic areas of Mount Hood. In Heather Canyon a series of waterfalls tumbles beneath this trail.

Umbrella Falls (W23): This popular and family-friendly waterfall is accessible from scenic hiking trails. Look up! You’ll see a chair lift too. Click here to read all about the hike.

White River Falls (W33): The waterfall is the main focus of the White River Falls State Park and for good reason — the scenic White River plunges 90-feet from a basalt shelf. It’s been written up in many books too, see the titles here.

Tamolitch Falls (W45): Follow the McKenzie river through the old growth forest to Tamolitch Falls, which flows into a lava formed Blue Pool, renowned for its iridescent blue coloring. Want to see it for yourself? Here’s what you need to know.

cascade waterfalls oregon

Sahalie Falls (W46): Sahalie Falls, is the first and tallest of three waterfalls on the roaring McKenzie River. It plunges about 100 feet over a naturally formed lava dam. Here’s how to hike there.

Koosah Falls (W47): Koosah Falls, aka Middle Falls, is the second of the three major waterfalls of the McKenzie River, in the center of the Willamette National Forest. The waterfall plunges into a pool, south of Santiam Pass, a renowned 4,817-foot mountain pass in the Cascade Range. Visit with time to make the most of the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail and other nearby activities.

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CENTRAL AND EASTERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Hurricane Creek Falls (W24): Hurricane Creek Falls are located along granite and limestone cliffs and an incredible amount of wildflowers along the Hurricane Creek Trailhead at Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

Falls Creek Falls (W25): This is one of the prettiest waterfalls in the Pacific Northwest! Come see three tiers of this waterfall drop 335-ft and decide for yourself.

BC Creek Falls (W26): Located near Wallowa State Park, BC Creek Falls (W26) lies within the Chief Joseph Mountain Trail, approximately an 8-mile out-and-back trail near Joseph. In less than 3-miles on the trail you’ll find two rivers and Wallowa Lake views, in addition to the falls. Click here to print a map to the trail.

Wallowa Falls (W27): Take Chief Joseph Trail to Wallowa Falls (and BC Falls – just a few miles away). Wallowa falls seems more like a long rapid but its location, nested in a deep gorge is beautiful. While in the area, check out the new Wallowa Falls Campground and enjoy a picnic with a view!

John Day River (W37): This is the longest un-dammed river in Oregon. The section between Service Creek and Tumwater Falls flows through a colorful canyons and beautiful terrain. Want to spend a few days exploring this area? You’ll find a 3-day itinerary here.

Steelhead Falls (W48): Formed a few million years ago, this Oregon waterfall is lined by colorful 25-foot cliffs. The fall drops into a deep canyon. It’s a popular go-to destination for swimming and cliff jumping.

Tumalo Falls (W53): Tumalo Falls is both the tallest, 89 feet, and most impressive waterfall along Tumalo Creek – as well as one of the most popular outdoor destinations in the vicinity of Bend. Learn more here.

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Benham Falls (W58): These are the largest falls on the upper Deschutes River. Unlike the other falls the area, Benham Falls is not related to a lava flow. It is a free-form cascade in its own right. Here’s how to hike there.

Fall River Falls (W59): A trail passes by historic cabin ruins and parallels the Fall River all the way to the falls. It’s a popular fly fishing spot.

McKay Crossing Falls (W60): This 23-foot waterfall plunges into a small canyon with several picture-ready viewpoints. Check out these photos.

Paulina Creek Falls (W61): This waterfall is known for its side-by-side drop of 80-feet that surrounds a small island at the edge of the cliff. Here’s where to get the best view.

oregon waterfalls

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COLUMBIA GORGE WATERFALLS
Bridal Veil (W8): Hidden beneath the Historic Columbia River Highway, this small two-tiered waterfall is easy to reach. Make sure to check out the romantic messages carved into the handrails of the viewpoint. See part of the trail now.

Wiesendanger Falls (W9): Named after Forest Service Ranger, Albert Wiesendanger, the 55-foot falls are also known as Upper Multnomah Falls, Twanklaskie Falls, and Double Falls (the latter together with Ecola Falls). Learn more about Wiesendanger Falls here.

Ponytail Falls (W10): Ponytail Falls, also known as Upper Horsetail Falls, is on Horsetail Creek just above Horsetail Falls. This is one of the more popular waterfalls for professional photographers, for stunning pictures looking out from behind the falls. See a ‘behind’ shot.

Elowah Falls (W11): Elowah Falls drops 289 feet into an amphitheater of lava flows of millions of years ago. Please note: The trail to the bottom of Elowah Falls is closed until further notice due to a massive landslide that buried the trail and bridge across McCord Creek but you can still see Elowah Falls from the McCord Falls trail.

Wahclella Falls (W12): OregonHikers.org describes this fall as one of the more interesting falls in the Columbia River Gorge. It runs along Tanner Creek and features two drops.

Starvation Creek Falls (W13): This waterfall is an anomaly in that it’s a manmade waterfall! Highway crews created tunnel through the rock to divert Warren Creek here in the 2930s and solve an issue with the creek and the highway. The water shoots out from a long tunnel and, well, falls… creating Starvation Creek Falls. Read all about it!

Historic Columbia River Highway waterfalls — including Multnomah Falls, Horsetail Falls, Latourell Falls, and Wahkeena Falls; W14): You can tour the waterfalls that make up the Columbia River Gorge by car or on foot, but you won’t have the full-on spectacular experience unless you do both. Whatever you do, make sure to save time to see Multnomah Falls. It is the most visited natural recreation site in the Pacific Northwest and more than 2 million visitors come each year to take in its view. Before you go, print this map of a waterfall tour loop on the Historic Columbia River Highway.

historic columbia river highway waterfalls

Ecola Falls (W15): Ecola Falls is the last major of the falls as you travel upstream on the Larch Mountain Trail. What does ecola mean? It’s the Chinook word for whale.

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OREGON COAST RANGE
Bridge Creek Falls (W5): This three tier fall has a 35-ft drop and is right near Highway 6 by the Footbridge Trailhead. Learn more.

Fern Rock Falls (W6): An understated and beautiful waterfall along Highway 6.

University Falls (W7): Located within an area that was devastated by one of the worst forest fires in Oregon’s history, this forest was rehabilitated, trees were planted (more than 70 million!) and the Tillamook State Forest began. University Falls is a 55-ft fall over a wall of basalt. Check out what this hiker had to say while on the quest to take the family holiday photo by the fall.

Green Peak Falls (W41): This is the second waterfall on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. First, you’ll see Alsea Falls. While most people tend to stop there, there’s a second waterfall, just as beautiful but larger, father ahead. Keep going, you’ll likely find a magical moment of solace and beauty.

Alsea Falls (W42): This is the namesake and the first of two cascades on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. It’s stunning, quick, and easy to reach. See some pics!

oregon coast waterfalls

Sweet Creek Falls (W49): Four tiered-plunges from varying heights cascade for about 70-feet, making an impressive multi-waterfall effect. Bring your camera!

Beaver Creek Falls (W50): If there were a meet cute for waterfalls, this would be it. Beaver Creek is a small waterfall where Beaver Creek and Sweet Creek meet and intertwine into one. Even the two names are movie-esque! Take a peek at some of the trail.

Lower Kentucky Falls (W51): The Kentucky Falls Trailhead has three falls. First comes Upper Kentucky Falls, then 2-miles later through an old growth forest you’ll see spectacular twin falls plunging 100 feet, they are: Lower Kentucky Falls and North Fork of the Smith Falls.

Upper Kentucky Falls (W52): The Upper Kentucky Falls is the first of three spectacular waterfalls on the Kentucky Falls Trailhead.

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SOUTHERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls (Susan Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls, Watson Falls, Toketee Falls, Clearwater Falls; W55):
You can tour all the waterfalls that make up the Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls while you picnic and hike or you can focus on the favorites we listed here. Your choice!

Diamond Creek Falls (W56): There’s a reason Diamond Creek Falls and its graceful cliffside drop is thought of as one of the prettiest waterfalls in Oregon. Come see for yourself!

Salt Creek Falls (W57): This is a popular stop for travelers on Highway-58. It’s also the second highest waterfall in Oregon. Get the insider’s scoop on the viewing platform.

Rogue River Gorge Falls (W63): At the head of the gorge you’ll find this waterfall, right where the river splits around volcanic rock. The view is stunning and made even better by the surrounding forest.

Prospect Waterfalls (Pearsony Falls, Barr Creek Falls, Prospect Falls, Mill Creek Falls; W64): This series of cascades follow the Rogue River just outside the town of Prospect. The river drops and ricochets until it hits a stretch of boulders.

southern oregon waterfalls

Klamath Falls (W66): Define waterfall? That’s what you might think when you see the falls of Klamath Falls. They’re more of a set of whitewater rapids. And yet, they’re beautiful and worth the trek.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

OREGON COAST WATERFALLS
Youngs River Falls (W1): Grab your bathing suit! This 50-foot waterfall is a popular swimming spot during the summer months.

Hug Point Falls (W3): This waterfall sits at a beach and is surrounded by several caves. It’s name has an interesting backstory too.

Blumenthal Falls (W4): This is one of the few waterfalls in the Northwest that you can see fall into the Pacific Ocean without needing any help from a boat, thank you.

Munson Creek Falls (W28): Whoa! This is the tallest waterfall in the Coast Range — tumbling 319 feet over several tiers. A small trail winds along the Munson Creek through an old-growth forest to find the base of the fall.

munson creek falls

Upton Falls (W29): Something fishy? Well, maybe fish-related at least. This fall was the upstream limit of migration for native fish but the falls have been altered to include a fish ladder and a dam to divert the water too. Read more on its history here. See spectacular photos here.

Drift Creek Falls (W34): The 240-foot suspension bridge (the longest in all of Oregon!) crosses the canyon beside the 8-ft falls, making this waterfall excursion unlike any other.

Rocky Creek Falls (W38): Pull off Highway 101 and you’re likely to see these easy-to-reach and easy-to-spot falls. They spill right into the Pacific Ocean. Get driving directions here.

Golden Falls (W54): Did you know that if you hike a little over a mile to the top of Golden Falls you can see a bird’s-eye view of the waterfall, firs, and cedars. That’s something to write home about! Golden Falls is the third tallest waterfall in the Oregon Coast Range.

Elk Creek Falls (W62): It may be last but it’s not least. Elk Creek Falls is the final of about a dozen significant waterfalls situated within the Elk Creek basin. It is also the only waterfall among those with easy or developed access of any kind. It’s made up of four tiers in a narrow and twisty canyon. Read this first-hand account of getting to Elk Creek.

Secret Beach Falls (W65): Shh… it’s called a secret because it’s hard to find but here’s the skinny. Tucked into the northern-most end where the Oregon Coast Trail squishes between the road and the overlook to Thunder Rock Cove, you’ll find a nearby trail that leads to a small beach with a waterfall. Use this to plan your trip.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

WILLAMETTE VALLEY WATERFALLS
Beaver Falls (W2): Beaver Falls spills from a lip of basalt into a turquoise-colored pool. Some say that if you come at the right time, you’ll see rainbows in the mist. The best part, if you’re on a mission to see many waterfalls, Beaver Falls is one you can spot from the road if you’d rather not walk the trail.

Willamette Falls (W16): This horseshoe-shaped block waterfall is created by a basalt shelf in the river bottom. It’s fall is 42 ft high and 1,500-ft -wide and set the record for being the largest waterfall by water volume in the Northwest and also for being the 18th largest by volume. Surrounding the falls are the locks, which are the oldest continuously operating multi-lift lock and canal system in all of the United States.

willamette falls

INSIDER TIP! If you want to see a boat go through the locks, call the lockmaster’s office at 503-656-3381 and they can tell you when boats are scheduled to go through. Click here to download information on the Willamette Falls Locks curated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Learn even more through The Willamette Falls Heritage Foundation, whose on a mission to preserve and share stories of people and the power of the water at the great falls of the Willamette River.

Niagara Falls (W30) and Pheasant Creek Falls (W31): Follow the foliage then cross not one wooden bridge but FOUR — each with a magnificent view of two 100-ft waterfalls: Niagara Falls and Pheasant Creek Falls. Click here for more details and here for a trail map.

Scotts Mills Falls (W32): Scotts Mills Falls is a small fall with big popularity. It sits at the site of a former flour mill and cascades through a rocky cliff into the large swimming hole.

Falls City Falls (W35): Falls City Falls are at the center of Falls City. In fact, Falls City is named after the falls. In the past, this was a lumbermill town.

Trail of Ten Falls at Silver Falls State Park (W36): This is Oregon’s largest State Park, coming in at 9,000-acres. It also has one of the most impressive waterfall day-hikes in the United States! Well, there are at least 10 spectacular falls within this 7.8 mile-loop. Here’s what you need to know before you go.

Parker Creek Falls (W39): To see Parker Falls you’ll need to work your way through the Parker Falls Trail. The rewards are huge! You’ll see a series of waterfalls, pools and cascades nestled in a forest of Douglas fir. Get more specifics here.

Alder Creek Falls (W40): Just east of Sweethome, Alder Creek Falls is on the way to Marys Peak, a must-see destination and the highest point in Oregon’s Coast Range. Download a Marys Peak Trail Guide here.

Royal Terrace Falls (W43): Royal Terrace Falls is the biggest of the four falls at McDowell Creek Falls Park though it’s also the lowest-volume. A sign nailed to a nearby tree says the falls drop 119 feet. The falls happen where Fall Creek drops over the valley into a whimsical stair-step type of display that also allow for an experiential component.

Majestic Falls (W44): This 39-ft waterfall is arguably the most beautiful of McDowell Creek Park. There are staircases with nearly 70 steps that let you explore the cascading waterfall from different vantage points.

willamette valley waterfalls

Which Oregon waterfalls will you visit? Click here to find the best Oregon bed and breakfast nearby for your specific travel dates and preferences.


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The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon!


POPULAR QUESTIONS ABOUT OREGON WATERFALLS 

What is the largest waterfall in Oregon?
Multnomah Falls is the largest waterfall in Oregon. More specifically, it’s the tallest waterfall in Oregon, measuring 611-ft.

How many waterfalls are there in Oregon?
There are at least 238 waterfalls in the state of Oregon. The Northwest Waterfalls Survey estimates more than 1,000.

How many waterfalls are in Silver Falls State Park in Oregon?
There are a total of 17 waterfalls in Silver Falls State Park in Oregon. In fact, the Trail of Ten Falls loop will take you above, around, and even behind 4 of the 10 waterfalls.


Did we miss any must-see Oregon waterfalls? Please let us know!

oregon bucket list

Looking for an Oregon Bucket List?

There’s no shortage of things to do in Oregon! How many of these authentic Oregon experiences can you cross off your list while you’re here?

  • Put your feet in the ruts left by pioneer wagons
  • Sample your way through one of the nine Oregon Food Trails
  • Climb the stairs of an Oregon lighthouse
  • Munch on some Oregon hazelnuts (99% of US hazelnuts are grown here)
  • Pedal along one of Oregon’s 17 Scenic Bikeways
  • Find your new favorite wine at one of our 700 wineries
  • Recreate your favorite movie scene at a local movie site
  • Feel the mist of an Oregon waterfall on your face
  • Experience the joy of staying at a local bed and breakfast
  • Buy something you gotta have – tax free!
  • Count the whales along the Pacific Ocean
  • Drive one of the beautiful byways
  • Dig for fossils along the hills
  • _________________________
  • _________________________

Click here to print your own Oregon Bucket List!


The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. Please complete the form below to receive your free limited edition map now, while supplies last! If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

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NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

We look forward to hearing how many items you cross off your Oregon Bucket List!