Category Archives: Geotourism

Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest

Four County PointWe all know the another Four Corners in America that is a big-time tourist destination. That would be the only place where four state boundaries meet: Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

In Oregon, our Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest notes the meeting of Clatsop, Columbia, Washington and Tillamook counties. A stone sunk into the Coast Range forest, not far off U.S. 26, marks the only place in Oregon where four county points meet.

Hike the Four County Point Trail

Four County Point is located on US Highway 26 and we invite you to take a moderate 1 mile hike hike through a Douglas Fir Forest on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

Bonus: for those searching geocaches – 4 – Corners Oregon geocache GCAD7A

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregon

The Courthouse Elm ‘was given to Douglas County by Binger Hermann. Hermann served in the U.S. Congress from 1885 until 1897, and again from 1903 until 1907. During the intervening years, he was Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, D.C.

The Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregonoccasion for the tree donation is not known positively, but research suggests that it was planted very near the turn of the century, possibly at a dedication ceremony for courthouse, which was rebuilt after a fire on December 7, 1898.

‘In addition to its heritage, the tree gives much pleasure to local residents with its great spreading crown and huge supporting limb structure.’ Oregon Travel Information Council

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 71′
  • Planted in: Approx. 1900
  • Circumference: 13′ 4″
  • Dedicated on: April 6, 1999
  • Crown: 103′

This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic drive away from C.H. Bailey House, a Roseburg Bed and Breakfast.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Huntington Wagon Road Junipers

Following the line of a very old Native American Trail, the Huntington Wagon Road was marked by J.W. Petit Huntington in 1864 as a route between The Dalles and Fort Klamath.

When the road was firmly established, it was used by prospectors, homesteaders, soldiers, and tradesman. Warm Springs Indian scouts frequently used the road in skirmishes with the Paiutes between 1865 and 1867. Heavy wagon-use along the road created deep ruts that are still visible today. Much of the original road later became OR Hwy 97—the main north to south arterial route through Central Oregon.

Three blazed Junipers are included in the Heritage grove. These craggy notched trees, marking the trail, range from approximately 25-feet to 32-feet and boast girths measuring from just under seven feet to nearly 11 feet.

Species: Juniperous occidentalis
Age: Unknown, several hundred years
Circumference: Approx. 90″
Height: from 25′ to 33′

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Pinus ponderosa – Big Tree – The Biggest Ponderosa Pine ever Recorded

This majestic pine is the biggest of its species ever recorded. It was a giant before the Oregon Territory was established, enduring centuries of fire, insects, disease, and human impact. Recently half of its crown was lost to weather, making another Ponderosa pine taller, but “Big Tree” remains the largest in circumference.

Tree facts

  • Approx. height: 162
  • Approximate Age: 500 years
  • Circumference: 28′ 11″

Visit this tree

It is located in La Pine State Park, about 5 miles west of US Highway 97, 27 miles south of Bend.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak, numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family, and a large incense cedar that sheltered the family’s cattle at night and during foul weather. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Ellmaker Oak:
Age: 300+
Circumference: 178.4”
Height: 76
Crown spread: 97’

This magnificent grove of trees is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Octopus Tree Heritage Tree

Octopus Tree in the Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge

Octopus Tree Heritage Tree‘The forces that shaped this unique Sitka spruce, Picea sitschensis, have been debated for many years. Whether natural events or possibly Native Americans were the cause remains a mystery.

‘The tree measures more than 14 feet across at its base and has no central trunk. Instead, limbs extend horizontally as much as 30 feet before turning upward. It is 105 feet tall and is estimated to be around 250 years old.”

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 105′
  • Age: approx. 250 years
  • Circumference: 46′ 7″
  • Dedicated On: October 23, 2009
  • Crown: 92′

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Bonus: for those searching geocaches – Picea Sitchensis Octopoda GC3M4NX

The largest Sitka Spruce in Oregon can be found less than a mile away. Follow the Big Spruce Trail to behold this awesome 800 year Oregon Champion Tree. Bonus: Great Grandma Tree GC1KP5Q

Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge is a short drive from Oceanside Oregon, a cozy little hideaway located just off the Three Capes Scenic Route. Built upon a hillside overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Oceanside offers the ambiance of a quaint European Village.

At Thyme and Tide Bed and Breakfast in Oceanside fall asleep to the sound of the surf and wake up to a delicious hot breakfast.

Also in Oceanside: turtlejanes bed and breakfast offers two beautifully appointed bedrooms with spectacular views, king-size beds, private bathrooms with heated floors, and blackout shades on the windows.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Giant Spruce of Cape Perpetua on the Oregon Coast. Oregon Heritage Trees tell the Oregon Story.

Giant Spruce of Cape Perpetua‘Half a century before Christopher Columbus sailed to the America’s, a tiny Sitka spruce began its life nourished by a nurse log on the Oregon coast. Today, it is the largest and oldest tree in the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area of the Siuslaw National Forest. Nearly 600 years old, it stands over 185 feet tall and has a circumference of 40 feet. (yes, that is a 100# dog standing in it’s base next to her human)

‘Nearby the tree, indigenous people dwelled at the mouth of Cape Creek for 1500 years. In the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps established a camp here and built the first trail to the tree, probably opening up an ancient Indian trail.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 185′
  • Age: Approx. 600 years
  • Circumference: 40′
  • Dedicated on: September 15, 2007

Oregon Coast Bed and Breakfasts

It’s possible to drive the entire Pacific Coast Scenic Byway in a single day. But why would you when you have 5 member inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild from Cannon Beach to Port Orford?  Take a few days, explore Oregon and the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Sitka Spruce

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

Sitka Spruce ‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

The Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

‘This Sitka Spruce was the first tree to be designated an official Oregon Heritage Tree and was once the biggest tree in Oregon and the National Co-Champion Sitka Spruce. It germinated from a seed on the forest floor around the time of the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215 and grew to its mature height about the time Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world. A legacy of the primeval coastal old growth rain forests of the Pacific Northwest, it was also remarkable for being bypassed for logging when spruce was in high demand for building military aircraft, but it was considered to have too many limbs to meet the standards of the national aircraft board.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 216′
  • Age: Approx. 800 years
  • Circumference: 56′
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 1997
  • Crown: 93′

‘Sadly, this once magnificent tree suffered severe damage on December 2, 2007 when hurricane force winds snapped the tree about 80 feet above ground along an old lightening scar. The top portion shattered as it hit the ground.’

Visit the Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

This tree is located on US Highway 26 in Klootchy Creek County Park. Visit it on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Hoover-Minthorn Pear 🍐 Pyrus communis

Called a Winter Pear this tree was planted in 1879 by Jesse Edwards, the Quaker founder of Newberg, Oregon. This property was sold in 1884 to Dr. Henry John Minthorn, uncle and foster father of Herbert Hoover. It’s scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

‘When the 11 year old Hoover arrived here from Iowa in 1885 to live with his uncle John Minthorn and family, he joined in the task of making pear butter and was told that he could eat as many pears as he liked. His experience with pears is best expressed by his own words, “I liked them, but after two days of almost exclusive pear diet, I did not eat pears again for years.” Herbert Hoover went on to become the 31st President of the United States.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 30′
  • Planted in: 1879
  • Circumference: 4′ 7″
  • Dedicated on: August 10, 2005
  • Crown: 27′ – 28′

The Hoover Minthorn Pear and Hoover-Minthorn Historic House are a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Heritage Tree

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Owen Cherry – 174 years in Eugene Oregon

Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853. By 1950 the site of the tree was owned by George Owen, a former Eugene City Councilor, lumberman, and philanthropist. Mr. Owen donated the site to the city. The Owen Rose Garden has more than 4,500 roses of over 400 varieties.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 49′
  • Planted in: 1860’s (possibly 1847)
  • Circumference: 18″ 3″
  • Dedicated on: April 6, 1999
  • Crown: 80′

The featured photo of the Owen Cherry tree in full bloom was taken April 8, 2021. It’s beautiful year round, as is the Rose Garden, but to see it in all it’s glory plan your trip now. This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Magnificent Oregon Trees recognized in April leading up to Arbor Day 2022

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.