Category Archives: Oregon Bounty

December is National Pear Month

December is National Pear Month and here in Oregon we believe pears should be celebrated all year long. But we’ll especially celebrate the bounty of pears in December when it is National Pear Month.

This video reveals the most common pears grown in Oregon and Washington but some growers have expanded their orchards with many more heirloom and lesser known varieties.

Nutritional Benefits

  • Fiber: A medium pear has 6 grams of fiber, which equals about 24 percent of the recommended daily value. Did you know that the skin contains the majority of the fiber found in a pear?
  • Hypoallergenic: With an ever-growing population of food allergies, pears have been coined to be hypoallergenic. Safe food is good food!
  • Pectin: Pectin is an essential water-soluble fiber that helps to bind to cholesterol and remove it from the body making pears an excellent addition to anyone with high cholesterol.There are endless culinary possibilities for the pear: eaten fresh, in salads, baked or added to a skillet meal. This is one of our favorite: Gingered Pear and Raspberry Pandowdy at the Old Parkdale Inn
  • There are currently over 350 pear growers in Oregon
  • The pear is Oregon’s Official State Fruit
  • Pears are Oregon’s number one tree fruit crop
  • Oregon’s total pear production ranks 2nd overall in the United States and 2nd in terms of fresh pear production

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Pumpkin Pinots Pears

Serving up Pears at an Oregon Bed and Breakfast

Imagine waking up in the morning to the slight scent of fresh brewed coffee, muffins baking in the oven and knowing someone has already been up for hours just to prepare breakfast for you. That’s what you can look forward to when visiting one of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild inns.

We recently asked our innkeepers to submit their favorite recipes and were pleased to see that once again, we are all about keeping it local and fresh. The recipe that follows is made with pears. Did you know that 84% of the nation’s pears are grown in Oregon and Washington? The volcanic soil provides pear tree nourishment, the rain and snowmelt provides moisture and of course our ideal temperature is a huge factor.

Mary and Steve Pellegrini have owned the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast in the Hood River Valley for over 17 years. Their recipe using Bosc pears is easy, tasty, and the presentation is gorgeous. She calls it, “Microwave Poached Bosc Pears with Raspberry Sauce”

  • peel one ripe pear per person but leave the stem on
  • cut a small slice from the bottom of pears to flatten so they stand upright
  • put pears in a microwave safe dish and pour one tablespoon of maple syrup over each one
  • cover and microwave about one and half minutes per pear until hot
  • place pears on individual small plates and pour about one tablespoon raspberry syrup over each pear
  • garnish with raspberries

If you are planning a trip to Oregon’s Mt Hood Region, stay with Pellegrini’s at the Old Parkdale Inn. We’re sure after 17 years of innkeeping, they has more wonderful breakfast recipes to share with you.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Pear Ginger Jam

Pear Ginger Jam at Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast

Pear Ginger jam is a guest favorite at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast, An inspected and approved member of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild the Old Parkdale Inn is located in the Hood River Valley, the largest pear growing region in our nation. This jam is a beautiful gold color, with a not-too-sweet pure pear flavor, a little hit of fresh and crystalized ginger, and a bright lemony finish.

Pear Ginger Jam ~ Makes about 7-8 half pint jars

  • 5 cups cored and chopped pears
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoons grated fresh lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons peeled, grated fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup minced crystallized ginger
  • 3 1/2 cups sugar, divided
  • 1 3/4 oz box powdered light fruit pectin (Sure-Jell in the pink box for less sugar)

Process:

Place pears, lemon juice, zest, and ginger in a medium saucepan over high heat. Stir in 1/4 cup sugar, and the pectin. Bring to a full rolling boil (a boil that doesn’t stop bubbling when stirred), stirring constantly. Stir in the remaining 3 1/4 cups sugar quickly. Return to a rolling boil, and boil exactly for 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat and skim off foam. Ladle into prepared jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Process in a boiling water canner for 10 minutes (or longer if high altitude).

The thing about breakfasts at an Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member inn is that they’ll be varied, wholesome and nutritious. And almost always local: we do local best. The important thing is that when you choose to stay at an Oregon bed and breakfast you let your innkeeper know (preferably in advance) about your eating preferences and we’ll do our best to comply.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Wildfire and Air Quality Update: While the wildfires burning across Oregon are not completely extinguished they’re under control and cooler temperatures, good, strong onshore flow and most importantly, some measurable rain will help flush out the atmosphere, get rid of the last of the wildfire smoke. And the harvest of Pumpkins, Pinots and Pears will go on.

Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, as travel restrictions are being lifted. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Winery Itinerary Tour Service

Winery Itinerary Tour Service at Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast

An Oregon Wine Country adventure would not be complete without a stay at Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast. And, since most visits to the Willamette Valley includes wine tasting, we’d like you to know that things have changed a bit from past years. Oregon wineries are requiring masks to be worn by all who are not seated at their tasting table. Easy, right? Also, due to social distancing, wineries have less capacity and most require reservations for tastings. Still easy, but a bit more effort. Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakast wants to help take the effort out of your winery reservation planning.

With more than 500 wineries in the Willamette Valley making reservations can be a daunting task. To help you out Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast offers a Winery Itinerary Tour Service for a $25 fee per itinerary. They have set up eight unique itineraries with some of their favorite, smaller wineries. After you choose an itinerary they’ll set up your day of tasting at 3 unique wineries of the Willamette Valley. You can easily add the Winery Itinerary Tour Service when you make your reservation online.

Chehalem Ridge Bed & Breakfast
sits atop Chehalem Mountain, overlooking the Willamette Valley, home to Oregon’s Wine Country. On weather-friendly mornings breakfast is served on the guest deck with great views of the town of Newberg, pinot noir vineyards and fruit and nut orchards. Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast offers a peaceful retreat from adventure and the valley below.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Wildfire and Air Quality Update: While the wildfires burning across Oregon are not completely extinguished they’re under control and cooler temperatures, good, strong onshore flow and most importantly, some measurable rain will help flush out the atmosphere, get rid of the last of the wildfire smoke. And the harvest of Pumpkins, Pinots and Pears will go on.

Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, as travel restrictions are being lifted. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be. We know Chehalem Ridge Bed & Breakfast is.

Pumpkin Pinots Pears

Pumpkins, Pinots and Pears and Oregon’s Bounty

Did you know that over 80% of the pears in the world were grown right here in Oregon? Mostly in the Hood River Valley in Northern Oregon. It’s the perfect time to take that drive called the “Fruit Loop” in Hood River, Oregon. Winding through orchards, farms, roadside stands and vineyards, the Fruit Loop sounds like a perfect thing to do while you are visiting an Oregon Bed & Breakfast.  Don’t forget to pick up some fresh fruit and a homemade pumpkin pie, or apple, or pear, or cherry.  They all go great with the Oregon Pinots.  

And then there’s the Pinots. Harvest of that lovely fruit that makes Oregon so famous for its wines will soon begin. Oregon’s prize winning, world renown, and absolutely palate pleasing wines are featured not only at our inns, but everywhere you go in Oregon.

Pairing some of Oregon’s wines with a few slices of several varieties of pears and of course pumpkin pie, makes for the perfect Autumn afternoon.

While you’re here search recipes, and see what dishes our innkeepers are making with Oregon’s “never ending harvest!”

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Wildfire and Air Quality Update: While the wildfires burning across Oregon are not completely extinguished they’re under control and cooler temperatures, good, strong onshore flow and most importantly, some measurable rain will help flush out the atmosphere, get rid of the last of the wildfire smoke. And the harvest of Pumpkins, Pinots and Pears will go on.

Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, as travel restrictions are being lifted. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

The Marionberry

The Marionberry ~ An Oregon Native

When you think about them, your mouth waters. When you eat one, the sweetness just makes you want more and when you serve them with a little oatmeal, brown sugar, and butter our guests are in heaven with dessert for breakfast.

That’s the Marionberry and it was born and raised exclusively in Oregon and is known as the “cabernet of blackberries” because of it’s rich, complex earthy flavor.  Again, the lush Willamette Valley’s spring rain and sandy soil provides the perfect medium to grow these lovely berries.  A cross between a Chehalem and Olallieberry, the marionberry or marion blackberry, created in 1945 at OSU, then released in 1956 has become the standard blackberry.  It was created to fulfill a need for a sturdy berry that could be frozen and put into processed foods and has now become the number one berry crop that is frozen then sold throughout the US and Canada.

The berry is used in pies, cobblers, crisps and can be served at any meal.

  • Using a ramekin, spray with non-stick spray, put 3/4c. frozen or fresh marionberries into the ramekin, sprinkle 2 tablespoons uncooked oatmeal over the berries, then sprinkle about 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar over the oatmeal and top with 1 tablespoon butter.
  • Bake about 20 minutes at 350 degrees or until berries are hot and butter is melted.
  • You can play with this easy recipe by adding whatever you like to the berries.  I have added hazelnuts, my homemade granola and even some cinnamon is good too.

Top the berry crisp with a dollop of fresh homemade whip cream and it’s like having dessert for breakfast.  Served up with an egg and onion scramble topped with fresh grated asiago cheese, a thick, warm, fresh from the oven square of cinnamon crumb cake, and several slices of sizzling turkey bacon it makes a simple breakfast at an Oregon Bed and Breakfast.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn. Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, as travel restrictions are being lifted. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

National Strawberry Shortcake

National Strawberry Shortcake Day

National Strawberry Shortcake Day is, today, June 14 and the innkeeper of the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast shares a guest favorite

Shortcakes ~ this recipe will make 8 shortcakes.  The innkeeper stretches it a little, making 6 slightly larger cakes, making room for more whipped cream and berries, and perfect for the 6 guests that the Old Parkdale Inn can accommodate.

2 cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup sugar
1 Tbs Grated lemon rind
1 Tbs baking powder
¼ teas salt
¼ cup chilled butter, cut into small pieces
¾ cup half and half
melted butter
2 teas sugar

Preheat oven to 450°
Shortcakes:  Whisk flour, sugar, lemon rind, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl.  Cut in the chilled butter with a pastry blender until the mixture is a coarse meal.  Add half and half and stir just until moist. Don’t overwork the dough if you’re looking for tender shortcakes. Drop by large spoonfuls onto a baking sheet. Brush with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar. Bake for 15 minutes or until brown

You’ll want to mix your berries with 3 tablespoons sugar and a splash of lemon juice then refrigerate while juices develop, at least 30 minutes.  In Oregon and the Hood River Valley we are blessed with an abundance of berries: Oregon’s child the marionberries, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries being just a few.  Use the freshest ones you can find, mix it up.

Try adding a drop of almond extract to the bowl as you whip up some fresh cream.  Slice the Shortcake in half horizontally, spoon the berries with their juice onto each shortcake bottom. Top with a generous dollop of whipped cream and then the shortcake top.  Garnish with slivered and whole mint leaves, a little more whipped cream and a few more berries.

The Old Parkdale Inn is located in the Upper Hood River Valley on the north slope of Oregon’s tallest peak, Mt. Hood, in the quaint town of Parkdale.  Outdoor adventure, farms, wineries and fine dining are nearby. Three well appointed rooms with private baths offer complete privacy and the serene gardens are perfect for romantic and restful getaways.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn. Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, as travel restrictions are being lifted. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be. We know the Old Parkdale Inn is.

Strawberry Rhubarb

The innkeeper at Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast shared her Lemon Blueberry Biscuits awhile back.Today she mixes it up a bit using Oregon strawberries and rhubarb that are in season.

We innkeepers love to bake. Most every breakfast includes a delectable treat made with local and fresh fruits and vegetables. Whether that dish is an main course or a side, something sweet is always included, using what’s seasonally available.
Enjoy

Strawberry Rhubarb Biscuit or Scone
Yield: 12-18

Ingredients:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees

2 Cups all-purpose flour
½ Cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
1 Cup vanilla yogurt
1 Large egg at room temperature
¼ Cup melted butter
½ Cup chopped strawberries
¾ Cup diced rhubarb

In a large bowl whisk the first 5 ingredients. Add egg, yogurt and melted butter. Stir until moistened. Fold in strawberries and rhubarb.
If you’re making biscuits you’ll drop about 1/3 cupful onto a greased baking sheet. For scones little bigger scoop. She also likes to line the baking sheet with parchment paper. Bake 15-18 minutes or until golden brown. Shorter time for strawberry rhubarb biscuits, a little longer for the bigger scone.

Glaze:
½ Cup confectioners’ sugar
¼ teaspoon vanilla
Enough milk or water to make the glaze drip off the spoon.
Mix glaze ingredients until smooth. Drizzle over warm biscuit/scone.

Wake to freshly brewed coffee and a creative, healthy, delicious breakfast at Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast. I’ll let you in on a little secret too: The signature dish for Yamhill Vineyards Bed & Breakfast is not a dish but “Wine before its time”. A variety of grape juice from the vineyard served with every breakfast.

Yamhill Vineyards Bed & Breakfast is a little known gem located in the heart of the Willamette Valley wine country. The Inn is surrounded by vineyards, spectacular views and has two large guest rooms, each with private baths offering a relaxed country retreat.

You’re sure to enjoy sweet treats such as these at the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is proactively taking steps to welcome you back when traveling restrictions have been lifted. Our member inns have always engaged in exemplary cleaning practices, and typically we hold ourselves to even higher standards than the guidelines provided by our health agencies. We’re taking it up a notch so as to provide the very safest environments for you, our employees and ourselves. We’re ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn

December is National Pear Month

Gingered Pear and Raspberry Pandowdy

A Gingered Pear and Raspberry Pandowdy made with famous Hood River Valley Pears.  The Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast is located in the Hood River Valley, the largest pear growing region in the nation. Many of our growers have cold storage units where we can pick up fresh pears almost all year round. This Gingered Pear and Raspberry Pandowdy has become a guest favorite.

Fruit Filling:

1/2 cup sugar
2 Tbs cornstarch
Pinch of fine sea salt
4 large pears, peeled, cored, and sliced
1 Tbs lemon juic
1 dry pint raspberries, fresh or frozen
1 Tbs cold butter, cut into small pieces

Preheat oven to 400°. Butter 4 small ramekins.
Fruit Filling: Rub the sugar, cornstarch and salt together in a large bowl, add pears and lemon juice and toss until evenly coated. Gently fold in raspberries and divide into ramekins. Dot with butter.

Biscuit:
1 3/4 cup flour
3 TBS plus 1 TBS sugar
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp fine salt
10 TBS cold butter
1/3 cup chopped candied ginger
2/3 cup plus 1 TBS cold buttermilk

Biscuit: Whisk together flour, 3 TBS sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut in butter until the size of peas. Stir in the Candied ginger, pour in the 2/3 cup buttermilk and stir until the dry ingredients are moistened. The dough will be crumbly, with large pieces of butter still visible. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured board and gently press the dough together. Divide into four pieces and place atop the fruit. Brush the dough with the remaining buttermilk and sprinkle with remaining sugar.

Bake in the lower third of the oven for 30 minutes, then turn the oven down to 350° and bake for an additional 20 minutes or until the pastry is golden and the juices are bubbly and thick. Allow to cool a bit before serving.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hood River Valley

October is National Apple Month

October is recognized as National Apple Month and Oregon is among the leaders in fine apple production.  Apples are a member of the rose family of plants and the blossoms are much like wild-rose blossoms. Oregon produces over 21 commercial apple varieties, with Fuji and Gala leading the state’s production but we know of one orchard, Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley that grow over 90 different varieties! The state’s rainfall and mild climate make it a prime location for apple orchards. The most orchards can be found in Oregon’s northwestern region near and around Portland.  In 2015 Oregon produced an estimated 110 million pounds of apples.

History of the Apple – Oregon Growers

In 1847, Henderson Luelling brought more than 700 one year old grafted fruit trees from Iowa to Oregon by ox-team along with his wife and 8 children.  Today, in front of a military building in the city of Vancouver, WA, an historic apple tree with a plaque on it records the following story: ‘In 1847, Henderson Lewelling, know for promoting the fruit industry in Iowa, Oregon, and California, came to Oregon in a covered wagon with his wife, children and 350 fruit trees that had survived the long journey.’  It goes on to say ‘By 1850, their first crop produced 100 apples. It was the time of the Gold Rush in California, and when they rushed to San Francisco with the apple crop, prospectors were so hungry for fresh fruit that he sold them for $5 each. They used the money to build more orchards.’

Today, the Hood River Valley is one of the major growers of apples.  Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley have been growing the finest produce available since 1911. The fertile soils found at the base of Mt. Hood and rarified, glacier-fed water sources create a unique growing environment.  The Kiyokawa’s take pride in promoting local and sustainably grown produce and utilize a farm management system that incorporates best management practices.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.