Category Archives: Willamette Valley

The Carlton Inn Bed and Breakfast

Asparagus Quiches from The Carlton Inn Bed and Breakfast
National Asparagus Day – May 24

These delicious mini Asparagus Quiches are simple, tasty and can be served as a hearty breakfast or a light meal anytime. Thanks to the innkeeper at The Carlton Inn Bed and Breakfast for sharing. They can be made in small ramekins for a elegant presentation or in a simple muffin tin.

Asparagus QuicheeServes 10-12 – muffin size

Ingredients:
2 tsp olive oil
1/2 cup sliced onion
2 garlic clove, minced
1 pound asparagus, trimmed and cut in pieces
cooking spray

1 1/4 cups milk
1 cup shredded Gruyere cheese (Havarti is a good alternative)
3 TBLS chopped fresh parsley
2 tsp Dijon Mustard
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp pepper
5 large eggs, lightly beaten
3 TBLS grated fresh parmesan cheese
1/4 cup green onion

Instructions:

1.  Preheat oven to 350F
2.  Spray a standard 12 cup muffin pan with cooking spray. I’ve also used ramekins (fewer portions)
3.  Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion and garlic, sauté 1 minute. Add asparagus, sauté another 2-3 minutes. Spread the mixture into the muffin tin.
4.  Combine milk, cheese, parsley, Dijon mustard, salt, pepper, and eggs in a large bowl.
5.  Pour milk mixture over asparagus mixture and sprinkle with parmesan and green onions.
6.  Bake at 350F for 20-25 minutes (longer if using ramekins) or until knife inserted in center comes out clean.
7.  Let stand 5 minutes before serving

Built in 1915, The Carlton Inn Bed & Breakfast is located within the charming community of Carlton, known as “The Wine Capital of Oregon.” A short drive and you’ll reach even more places to explore.

The Carlton Inn Bed and Breakfast has four comfortable bedrooms, 1 with a king size bed and private bath,  3 with private bath and queen size beds, living room with wood burning fireplace and TV area along with central air conditioning and wireless internet throughout.

Shop and travel Local

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon is still requiring masks in some outdoor public spaces and all indoor public spaces, that includes the inns of the Oregon B&B Guild. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Bird Watching

Oregon Bird Watching in the Willamette Valley

There is an amazing wildlife show at these three Oregon wildlife refuges. Oregon Bird Watching is amazing. Especially this time of year when activity along the major flyways increase.

The Oregon Cascades Birding Trail (OCBT) is a great place to begin your birding adventure. From there you can decide where you’d like to visit. When you have made that decision turn to the website for the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild and I am sure you will find an inn close by.

The Willamette Valley is known for its unique Bed and Breakfasts, fertile land with orchards, vineyards and rolling grass fields.  Nestled between the snow-capped volcanic peaks of the Cascade Mountains and the forests of the Coast Range it’s no wonder the valley offers an abundance of birds and bird habitats and the Willamette Valley Birding Trail will take you there.

Willamette Valley National Wildlife Complex provides protection for historically abundant oak savanna, native prairie, riparian forest and wetland habitats. In these three protected places, endangered plant populations grow, summer songbirds nest, and wintering waterfowl find sanctuary in vast wetlands.

A hungry flock of Canada Geese soar high and then land to munch the grass across deep lush pastures at the Baskett Slough Wildlife Refuge near Dallas, Oregon. They arrive at Baskett Slough from far off arctic nesting grounds and have come to this U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge for the habitat.

Located near the confluence of the Willamette and Santiam Rivers, Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. Established in 1965, the refuge provides wetlands and riparian woodland sanctuary for migratory and resident wildlife which range from the tiny Pacific chorus frog to the black-tailed deer.

Established in 1964, the William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge’s primary management goal is to provide wintering habitat for dusky Canada geese. Driving through the 5,325 acres of the refuge and the 341 acres of its Snag Boat Bend Unit, is like taking a step back into the natural history of the Willamette Valley.

The State of Oregon is a bird watcher’s paradise. There are extensive reserves and habitats that serve as excellent nesting and brood rearing areas for waterfowl and colonial nesting birds including American white pelican and several heron species. Many of our Member Inns have habitats on their grounds or are located near land ideal for birding. Grab your binoculars, choose an inn, and set out on your bird watching adventure.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

National Pi Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast shares their Crustless Apple Pie today, National Apple Pie Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast serves this Baked Apple as part of their three-course gourmet breakfast, typically with a more savory entrée because it is a bit sweet. Pairing the brown sugar and warm spices with a tart Granny Smith apple is the trick to achieving a good balance in the dish.

To make the filling just a bit more Oregonian, we use hazelnuts, but you could use walnuts if you can’t find hazelnuts. Fun fact: Oregon produces 99% of US hazelnuts, most of it in the Willamette Valley. You’ll see hazelnut orchards everywhere while you are out wine tasting.

Chehalem Ridge B&B serves the Baked Apple with vanilla yogurt, because, you know, breakfast. But if you choose to put some other vanilla dairy product on it (maybe something from the freezer?), you won’t be judged.  Enjoy safe at home, and start making plans to joins us for breakfast soon!

Crustless Apple Pie (aka Baked Apple)

Servings: 4

  • Yield: 4 apples
  • 4 small Granny Smith apples
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon clove, ground
  • 1/4 cup hazelnuts, chopped
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon butter, cut into 1/2″ cubes
  • 4 tablespoons vanilla yogurt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cut just a little off the bottom of each apple so that it sits upright and stable. Core each apple with apple corer or melon baller, leaving the bottom 1/4″ intact. Peel upper third of apple to prevent from splitting.

In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, spices, nuts and dried cranberries. Fill each apple equally with filling and pack it down into the cavity. Put in baking dish. Dot each apple with a small cube of butter. Bake until tender when pierced with a fork, about 30 to 35 minutes. Serve warm with yogurt over top.

You’re sure to enjoy sweet treats such as these at the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Willamette Stone

The Willamette Stone was a small stone obelisk originally installed by the Department of Interior in 1885

The Willamette Stone Heritage Site is located in the west hills of Portland, Oregon.  The surveys completed from this location promoted settlement of the Northwest and began the transfer of land from government ownership to private ownership.

The first marker, placed in 1851, a simple cedar stake, was replaced with a small stone obelisk in 1885.  In 1945 the property was purchased to preserve and protect the origin point of the land survey system for Oregon and Washington. A stainless-steel marker, set into the original obelisk, was rededicated in 1988.

The Willamette Meridian is one of 37 principal meridians in the United States.  All land surveys and property descriptions in the states of Oregon and Washington are referenced at this point. The Willamette meridian runs north-south, and the Willamette baseline runs east-west through the marker.

The Willamette Valley marks the end of the Oregon Trail and the history of that migration can be discovered at heritage sites, museums, and cemeteries across the region. Known for its premium wines, craft breweries, cideries, meaderies and distilleries the Willamette Valley is also home to unique, one-of-a-kind Bed and Breakfasts awaiting your visit.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Moon Tree

Moon Tree is a young Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir, raised from a seed carried to the moon by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa in 1971.

I just love this story: Moon Tree – an Oregon Heritage Tree in the Oregon State Capital State Park

Moon Tree‘The story begins in 1953 when a man named Stuart Roosa, a native of Oklahoma, took a job as a US Forest Service smokejumper, a firefighter who would parachute into the wilderness to fight forest fires. Roosa came to love the forests of Oregon, a love that he would have the rest of his life. Later, Stuart Roosa became an Air Force test pilot and eventually returned to Oregon in the 1960s to train in the moon-scape like craters of Central Oregon.

‘He was destined to become an astronaut and was scheduled to fly on Apollo 14. In those days every Apollo astronaut was permitted to take a few small personal things into space with them. What they chose varied greatly. Alan Shepard chose golf balls, John Young on Gemini 3, took a corned beef sandwich. Stuart Roosa took tree seeds. This wasn’t just a publicity stunt; it was a science project too.  Scientists wanted to know what would happen to the seeds if they went to the Moon. Would they sprout when they came back? So when Apollo 14 launched in 1971, nearly 500 tree seeds of various species were tucked away in astronaut Roosa’s personal property kit. Roosa didn’t walk on the moon since he commanded the orbiting space module, but the tree seeds did orbit the moon 34 times.

‘Upon their return to earth, many seeds were propagated and the seedlings planted in celebration of America’s bicentennial. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others.

‘Unfortunately, adequate records were not maintained at the time, so we don’t know where all the moon trees were planted. Only about 50 of them are presently accounted for, including six planted in Oregon. I’m researching their locations.

Tree Facts

  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Approx. height: 63′
  • Age: 31 years
  • Circumference: 19″
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 2003

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Eco Earth Globe In Salem Oregon

Happy Earth Day 2022

Riverfront Park in Salem, Oregon, is home to a number of annual events, including the World Beat Festival, 4th of July Celebration, Christmas tree lighting, and many various walk/run events. It is also home to the Eco Earth Globe, located at the southern portion of the park.

Story Behind the Globe


This sphere was originally a large pressurized tank used by Boise Cascade to hold acids that were used to “cook” wood chips into pulp. It was a 5-year process to transform this “acid ball” into a beautiful piece of art that includes 86,000 tiles depicting the entire globe, created by local artists and students, reflecting the diversity on land and water.

Eco-Earth Globe Restoration

After years of exposure to the elements, the Eco-Earth Globe began to lose tiles and show signs of disrepair. The Salem Parks Foundation has graciously stepped up to coordinate a community fundraising effort with a goal to raise $300,000 (of the $400,000 estimated total) for these repairs.

Story Behind Riverfront Park

The City of Salem bought this property from Boise Cascade and started clearing it during the 1980s. The 26-acres of existing parkland is the result of industrial land conversion. Paper, flour, and woolen mills, as well as a coal gasification plant and an auto junkyard formerly occupied the site. The Riverfront Carousel was added in 2001. The most recent addition to the park came in 2005, when the Salem Rotary Club, as their centennial project, raised funds and built an open-air pavilion in the park. In addition to the pavilion, the overlook and floating boat dock were also added in 2005. Not only is the dock home to the Willamette River Queen, but it can also accommodate canoes and kayaks while offering a beautiful view of the Willamette River.

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Recipes Oregon Bed and Breakfast

Southwest Eggs Benedict from Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast

Eggs Benedict is an American brunch or breakfast dish that consists of two halves of an English muffin each of which is topped with Canadian bacon, a poached egg, and hollandaise sauce. Many variations on the basic recipe are served and this one from Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast is a bit out of the box and oh so delicious.

The original recipe was from Maryana Vollstedt, The Big Book of Breakfast with just a wee bit of change from the innkeeper at Chehalem Ridge.

Southwest Eggs Benedict
Servings: 6

8 each saltine cracker, broken up
2 each garlic cloves, chopped
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon salt
ground pepper to taste
2 cans black beans, canned, rinsed
6 each green onions, chopped
2 sprigs cilantro, chopped
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

In food processor, grind crackers well. Add garlic, cumin, chili powder, salt and pepper and blend well. Add one can of beans and blend well. Then add the second can, the green onions and cilantro and blend until just incorporated. Add water, one teaspoon at a time, until you reach consistency to hold together without being too sticky. Form into 12, 3 inch round, ½ inch high patties. Fry patties over medium high heat in vegetable oil, about 5 minutes per side.

To serve, arrange 2 patties per plate, spread a fan of avocado on each patty, place a poached egg on the avocado and top with the grated cheese. Garnish with tomato salsa or corn relish cilantro sprigs

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast is perched on eight acres atop Chehalem Mountain overlooking the Willamette Valley and Coast Range. This B&B offers a peaceful retreat between adventures in the valley below.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Youngberg Hill

Youngberg Hill Vineyards and Inn will take your breath away with the most beautiful views, a warm luxurious Inn, and exceptional estate wines.

Youngberg Hill Inn As we gear up for the busy summer season ahead, we think it’s the perfect time to plan your getaway. You definitely deserve it. There’s nowhere better than Youngberg Hill, high on a hill and surrounded by 50 acres of vineyard and farmland.

Sit back, relax, and enjoy the view. Wine tastings are included with every stay!

Youngberg Hill provides the perfect location for those seeking a quiet, romantic getaway. The Inn is 10,000 square foot with four large guest rooms, three are corner rooms, and three suites, all with private baths. All rooms have spectacular views of the valley below. The entire main floor is common area for guests to enjoy the peace and tranquility of this special place.

Located 20 minutes from over 80 premier Oregon wineries guests have the opportunity to explore the 20 year old organic vineyard, taste the Youngberg Estates award winning wines while relaxing on the expansive veranda surrounding the house. Youngberg Hill provides a great base for touring the other fine wineries of the Oregon wine country.

This is spectacular location for a beautiful and elegant wine country wedding. Because each wedding is unique, your hosts look forward to working closely with you to create the day of your dreams. The Youngberg Hill Vineyard Event Center allows guests worry-free, year-round access to everything Youngberg Hill has to offer.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask mandates for indoor public places were lifted on March 12. Some businesses may choose to still require masks and some people may choose to still wear a mask. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and, most importantly, be kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak, numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family, and a large incense cedar that sheltered the family’s cattle at night and during foul weather. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Ellmaker Oak:
Age: 300+
Circumference: 178.4”
Height: 76
Crown spread: 97’

This magnificent grove of trees is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Sitka Spruce

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

Sitka Spruce ‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

The Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

‘This Sitka Spruce was the first tree to be designated an official Oregon Heritage Tree and was once the biggest tree in Oregon and the National Co-Champion Sitka Spruce. It germinated from a seed on the forest floor around the time of the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215 and grew to its mature height about the time Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world. A legacy of the primeval coastal old growth rain forests of the Pacific Northwest, it was also remarkable for being bypassed for logging when spruce was in high demand for building military aircraft, but it was considered to have too many limbs to meet the standards of the national aircraft board.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 216′
  • Age: Approx. 800 years
  • Circumference: 56′
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 1997
  • Crown: 93′

‘Sadly, this once magnificent tree suffered severe damage on December 2, 2007 when hurricane force winds snapped the tree about 80 feet above ground along an old lightening scar. The top portion shattered as it hit the ground.’

Visit the Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

This tree is located on US Highway 26 in Klootchy Creek County Park. Visit it on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.