Category Archives: Oregon History

Prospect Historic Hotel

Prospect Historic Hotel/Motel and Dinner House

The Prospect Historic Hotel/Motel and Dinner house was built in 1888 as a stagecoach stop halfway between the Rogue Valley and Crater lake.  This Nationally Registered Historic Hotel has been restored for full comfort while maintaining its charm.  Being the closest Bed and Breakfast to Crater Lake along the Rogue Umpqua Scenic Byway,  the inn is a perfect home base while exploring Southern Oregon’s National Forests, Wilderness areas and BLM land, and the majestic Lake, of course.

From the inn you can take a stroll to the Rogue River and three lovely waterfalls and to the Avenue of the Boulders, huge boulders thrown when Mt Mazama blew up 7000 years ago.  From the Prospect Hotel head out for the day to hike, bike, raft, fish, Cross Country Ski or snowshoe.  You get the picture: plenty to do from the Prospect Hotel.

Prospect Historic Hotel Bed and Breakfast Inn provides lodging in its 10 room, each with period furnishings and decorations, private baths and beautiful quilts on every bed.  Hearty belly filling breakfasts.  Stay where Teddy Roosevelt, Jack London, Zane Grey, John Muir, William Jennings Bryan, Gifford Pinchot and Hubert Humphrey slept. Relax in the sitting parlors, warming your toes at the fireplace and catch up on some local history from our collection of books.  Unwind on the wrap around Veranda with a glass of wine or a microbrew and a good book.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site

The Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site

The Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site, pronounced  “ee-weh-TEAM-lye-kin”, is an Oregon State Park adjacent to a Nez Perce National Historical Park, site of Old Chief Joseph Gravesite and Cemetery, all ancestral homes of the Chief Joseph Band of the Nez Perce.

Short trails with spectacular views of the Wallowa Mountains pass Knight’s Pond, a cool summer oasis and a peaceful respite for hikers. Look for spring and summer wildflowers during your walk. You also may catch glimpses of deer, fox, bear and raptors.

For an historic Oregon experience, consider spending a few days in Joseph, Oregon, and visiting the Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site at different times of day.  In the early morning you’ll probably find wildlife there.  During the day, watch the sun cast varying shadows on the Wallowa Mountains.  In the afternoon, visit Wallowa Lake and the Old Chief Joseph Gravesite.  Come back to Iwetemlaykin in the evening as the coolness descends.

Two Oregon bed and breakfasts welcome you to the Wallowa Valley and this Oregon State Treasure, Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site

  • Bronze Antler Bed & Breakfast is located nearby in Joseph.  This 1920s period bungalow is restored in the European Arts & Crafts style.  The inn’s library includes many books on local Oregon history to round out your geotourism experience.
  • Belle Pepper’s Bed and Breakfast is one block from Joseph’s main street,walking distance of galleries, restaurants, and other local businesses.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

The videos of Travel Oregon’s Oregon, Only Slightly Exaggerated reveal whimsical scenes of enchanting forests, vineyards, rivers, mountains and more, and share with you that magical feeling of being in Oregon.

Now the captivating artwork is coming to the real world, proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations.   Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community.  Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.  And while you’re there, visit the landmarks and businesses that make these towns just so magical.

The featured mural is in Ontario’s Red Apple Mall. At Oregon’s eastern edge and in a different time zone, Ontario is the gateway to desert beauty, stunning river canyons and towering mountain ranges. Any time of year, this little town is a great sunny destination and basecamp to outdoor adventures at the Owyhee Canyonlands, Lake Owyhee, Pillars of Rome and more. Make time for Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, which honors the area’s cultural heritage, Native American, Basque, European, Hispanic and Japanese.

There are several Oregon Trail Sites sights from the Idaho border to Baker City,  the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails.  From the top of Flagstaff Hill you can still see the trail running out across the plains.

Baker City Blue Door will be the first member in of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild as you travel into Oregon.  The historic home of two prominent Oregonians, the Inn is a simple and elegant get-away to rest and relax. Located on a tree-lined residential street, the inn is in the heart of historic downtown Baker City.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Guest blogger: Roselyn, innkeeper
R.R. Thompson House in Carlton Oregon

This Christmas, Pittock Mansion takes a look back at the hobbies and pastimes of the legendary family in its annual holiday extravaganza.

From knitting to hiking, beekeeping to music, the decorations highlight familiar and not-so-familiar hobbies enjoyed by Henry and Georgiana Pittock, their children and grandchildren who resided in the opulent mansion 100 years ago.

Volunteers have decorated each of the rooms in the 16,000 sq. ft. mansion into a holiday showcase. Each room displays items related to one or two hobbies, such as skiing, opera, tea parties or card games.

The displays are on view through December 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed Christmas Day).  Built in 1914, the mansion “tells the story of Portland’s transformation from pioneertown to modern, industrialized city through the history and legacy of one of its most influential families, the Pittocks.” (http://pittockmansion.org)

The decorated mansion is a holiday treat for locals and tourists alike. Adding to the ambiance are musical recitals in the music/living room with stunning views of the Portland skyline.

The R. R. Thompson House will be glad to host your visit to the Willamette Valley of Oregon. We are located in the ‘Great Little Town of Carlton,’ and just an hour’s drive to Pittock Mansion.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Oregon Trail

The Historic Oregon Trail turns 175 in 2018.  Time for you to hit the highway, inspire your own pioneer spirit, stand in the actual wagon ruts pioneers left behind, and visit the numerous interpretive sites, monuments and cultural centers along the way.

The Oregon Trail traversed 2,170 miles of what today is Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Idaho and Oregon.  Travel the Oregon National Historic Trail through Oregon, from Idaho, along the Columbia River and around Mt Hood.

There are several trail sights from the Idaho border to Baker City, the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails.  From the top of Flagstaff Hill you can still see the trail running out across the plains.  Lodging in Baker City, Oregon: Baker City Blue Door

The cemeteries along the route reveal so many Oregon Trail stories: where the emigrants came from, how they lived, and died, as they headed for Oregon and the awaited promises.

The last hurdle for emigrants on the Oregon Trail was the Cascade Range. Early pioneers either had to barge down the treacherous Columbia River, make their home in The Dalles, or travel the Barlow Road through the Cascades along the south side of Mt Hood.  Lodging option on Mt Hood: Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast 

The Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum reveals the cataclysmic floods that helped shape the Columbia River Gorge. Here also you’ll experience interactive exhibits of the Lewis and Clark expedition, The Oregon Trail and 10,000 years of Native American life in the Gorge.  Lodging: Hood River Bed and Breakfasts

At the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center and Historic Site in Oregon City, visitors can learn about the journey, discover what it was like to be a pioneer and what life was like for those who reached Oregon Territory.  Lodging options: Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts

“On such a journey as this, there is much to interest and amuse one who is fond of picturesque scenery, and of wild life.” – Randolph Marcy, 1859

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hood River Valley

October is National Apple Month

October is recognized as National Apple Month and Oregon is among the leaders in fine apple production.  Apples are a member of the rose family of plants and the blossoms are much like wild-rose blossoms.  Oregon produces over 21 commercial apple varieties, with Fuji and Gala leading the state’s production but we know of one orchard, Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley that grow over 90 different varieties! The state’s rainfall and mild climate make it a prime location for apple orchards. The most orchards can be found in Oregon’s northwestern region near and around Portland.  In 2015 Oregon produced an estimated 110 million pounds of apples.

History of the Apple – Oregon Growers

In 1847, Henderson Luelling brought more than 700 one year old grafted fruit trees from Iowa to Oregon by ox-team along with his wife and 8 children.  Today, in front of a military building in the city of Vancouver, WA, an historic apple tree with a plaque on it records the following story: ‘In 1847, Henderson Lewelling, know for promoting the fruit industry in Iowa, Oregon, and California, came to Oregon in a covered wagon with his wife, children and 350 fruit trees that had survived the long journey.’  It goes on to say ‘By 1850, their first crop produced 100 apples. It was the time of the Gold Rush in California, and when they rushed to San Francisco with the apple crop, prospectors were so hungry for fresh fruit that he sold them for $5 each. They used the money to build more orchards.’

Today, the Hood River Valley is one of the major growers of apples.  Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley have been growing the finest produce available since 1911. The fertile soils found at the base of Mt. Hood and rarified, glacier-fed water sources create a unique growing environment.  The Kiyokawa’s take pride in promoting local and sustainably grown produce and utilize a farm management system that incorporates best management practices.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Central and Eastern Oregon Museums

Central and Eastern Oregon Museums Worth making the trip

The Central and Eastern Oregon museums will take you back in time. A glimpse into an ever changing Oregon, it’s indigenous people, hearty immigrants, and hard working cattlemen.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute where the history, culture and hospitality of the people who have lived on this land for more than 10,000 years comes alive.  More than just a museum, Tamastslikt celebrates the traditions of Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes.

High Desert Museum, in Bend, Oregon, is nationally acclaimed and is dedicated to broadening the understanding of the High Desert’s wildlife, culture, art and natural resources.

At daily shows and demonstrations, wildlife experts will help you learn about the Museum’s more than 100 wildlife creatures — from porcupines, golden eagles and owls, to bats, lizards, snakes and spiders.   In the Birds of Prey Center you will have a rare opportunity to get a close-up look at some of nature’s fiercest predators – owls, hawks and eagles.

Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site in John Day, Oregon, is a must-see for anyone with an interest in Oregon history. This structure was built as a trading post on The Dalles Military Road in the mid-1800’s. Chinese businessman Lung On and herbal doctor Ing Hay worked out of this building. Dr. Hay administered care to the Chinese gold-mine workers, pioneers, and others from the John Day area and beyond by using traditional Chinese remedies. Built to preserve the legacy of the Chinese workforce in Oregon, the museum contains artifacts and displays that share some of the trials of everyday life of these people.

They walked for 2,000 miles…men, women, and children by the tens of thousands. The story of this journey comes alive today through the life-size exhibits at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City.  The museum offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. Let the innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild share their knowledge of these unique museums and many other natural attractions in the beautiful and vast expanse of Eastern Oregon.

These are but a few of the many historical museum located in Central and Eastern Oregon.  Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway

Traversing between Hood River and Mosier, the five mile section of the Historic Columbia River Highway passes through the Twin Tunnels and two climate zones.  Being closed to auto traffic is an amazing trail for hikers, bikers, rollerbladers, anyone human powered.  Starting at the east Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead near Mosier, the trail leads through semi-arid terrain dotted with ponderosa pine for about a mile until you reach the Twin Tunnels.  There is an Earthcache nearby, Missoula Ice Age Floods at Mosier Syncline Flanks GC4T299, which shares information about nearby spectacular geologic formations that tell the story of the gorge’s creation.

After passing through the tunnels, you’ll emerge into a forest of fir trees and other common western Oregon plants and stunning views of the Columbia River Gorge.  Viewpoints along the 3.5 mile segment from the tunnels to the west Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead overlook the river.  Consider a stay at Three Sleeps Vineyards Bed and Breakfast in Mosier when exploring the Historic Mosier Tunnels

Three Sleeps Vineyards B&B has two beautiful rooms that overlook their mountain vineyard and the little valley in Mosier full of cherry trees and a Mt. Adams view.  Only 15 mins from the heart of the Columbia River Gorge and Hood River you’ll feel like you are miles from anywhere. Both rooms have private baths and patios and their own entrances.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Vintage Weekend in Historic Independence Oregon

Vintage Weekend in Historic Independence Oregon

The Independence Downtown Association is hosting its first Vintage Weekend in Downtown Independence from April 20th – 22nd. There will be a Vintage Trailer Rally in the park, a street lined with antique and vintage vendors, downtown businesses participating in the theme by hosting their own events/promos, and much more!  The event will be FREE to the public.

Thanks to the innkeepers at MaMere’s Guest House for letting us know about the event sure to bring classic charm to Historic Independence.

Located in Monmouth Oregon, just across a city boundary from Independence MaMere’s Guest House is charming, unique and colorful inside and out!  The property is on the National Register of Historic Places and is perfectly placed with a very rich history. Built in 1891 as a boarding house for female students, it has since housed hundreds and continues to do so today in its present form as a B&B/Guest House.

The City of Independence is the third largest urban area in Polk County, Oregon. It is located twelve miles southwest of Salem, on the west bank of the Willamette River. It was known as the “Hop Capital of the World” from the late 1890’s to the 1940’s.  The first group of wagon trains to arrive in Independence set out on the Oregon Trail from Missouri in May, 1844,
arriving in Independence in June of 1845.

In 1989, a Historic District was formed in the City of Independence, and this District is also on the National Register of Historic Places. This 30-block area is located on the west bank of the Willamette River, and retains much of the early character and architecture from the 1880’s
to the 1920’s.

Take a step back in time at an Historic Bed and Breakfast,  shop, or just browse the antiques and vintage collectibles in historic downtown Independence, Oregon.  It’s part adventure, part history lesson, and part treasure hunting.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Over the Rivers

Over the Rivers and Through the Woods Scenic Byway

Over the Rivers and Through the Woods is a 66-mile scenic route beginning in the rich farmlands of the Willamette Valley, winding along rushing streams and through thick forests as it climbs into the Cascades to join the West Cascades and McKenzie Pass-Santiam Pass National Scenic Byways.

Over the Rivers

To start the journey take I-5 exit 216 about 25 miles north of Eugene east onto OR 228 toward Brownsville,  which was settled in 1846 and is Oregon’s third oldest town.  During winter months, grass fields around Brownsville host wintering bald eagles and large flocks of white tundra swans.  Much of the Byway parallels the Santiam Wagon Road. Take time to visit the historic museums and cemeteries along the way for a view into Pioneer life, many who traveled this road and the Oregon Trail to get to the lush, fertile Willamette Valley.

From Cascadia, the Byway continues along the South Santiam River. Thick forests are dominated by Douglas-fir, western hemlock and red cedar; big leaf maples and red alder provide contrast to the conifers, especially in the fall.

At the junction of Route 20 and Route 126, you can opt for the McKenzie Pass-Santiam Pass or the West Cascades National Scenic Byways.

Time to start planning your memorable Oregon Road Trip. Oregon has more designated scenic byways and tour routes than any other state.  The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is the only State Association of B&Bs and a welcoming inn awaits you as you travel the backroads.  I am presenting a series of blogs to assist you in creating amazing getaways and tours in Oregon.  Thanks Travel Oregon for sharing this information.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.