Category Archives: Oregon History

Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site

The Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site, pronounced  “ee-weh-TEAM-lye-kin”, is an Oregon State Park adjacent to a Nez Perce National Historical Park, site of Old Chief Joseph Gravesite and Cemetery, all ancestral homes of the Chief Joseph Band of the Nez Perce.

Twolobe Larkspur
Twolobe Larkspur

Short trails with spectacular views of the Wallowa Mountains pass Knight’s Pond, a cool summer oasis and a peaceful respite for hikers. Look for spring and summer wildflowers during your walk. You also may catch glimpses of deer, fox, bear and raptors.

For an historic Oregon experience, consider spending a few days in Joseph, Oregon, and visiting the Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site at different times of day. In the early morning you’ll probably see plenty of wildlife. During the day, watch the sun cast varying shadows on the Wallowa Mountains and visit the Old Chief Joseph Gravesite. Visit Wallowa Lake State Park and get a lift on the Wallowa Lake Tramway, rising above Wallowa Lake Village and the blue waters of Wallowa Lake. Come back to Iwetemlaykin in the evening as the coolness descends.

Mark your calendars and get ready for a special day of appreciation. State Parks Day is coming up on June 3rd, 2023 in Oregon, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to explore the beauty of the state parks.
Bronze Antler Bed & Breakfast is located nearby in Joseph and welcomes you to the Wallowa Valley and this Oregon State Treasure, Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site. This 1920s period bungalow is restored in the European Arts & Crafts style. The inn’s library includes many books on local Oregon history to round out your geotourism experience.

Bonus: for those searching geocaches
Iwetemlaykin GC3W9AP

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Oregon is chock-full of incredible state parks, 254 to be exact. There’s nothing quite like a day spent discovering which one might become your favorite. The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild suggest favorites with impressive trails, views, wildlife and natural wonders, all with a bit more solitude.

Cape Lookout State Park

Cape Lookout is located on a sand spit between Netarts Bay and the Pacific Ocean. This scenic park is a destination for hiking, beachcombing and visiting sites along the Three Cape Scenic Route.

The largest Sitka Spruce in Oregon can be found in the park, less than a mile away from the Octopus Tree, an Oregon Heritage Tree. Follow the Big Spruce Trail to behold this awesome 800 year Oregon Champion Tree. Bonus: Great Grandma Tree Geocache GC1KP5Q
suggested lodging: Thyme and Tide Bed and Breakfast

Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail

Sixty-eight of the original 73 miles of the Historic Columbia River Highway are now open to travel either by motor vehicle, foot and bicycle.
suggested lodging: Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast

Champoeg State Heritage Area

Champoeg State Heritage Area features a rare combination of history, nature, and recreation. Situated south of Newberg along the scenic Willamette River, Champoeg’s forests, fields, and wetlands recreate the landscape of a bygone era.

Provisional Government Park Cottonwood

Provisional Government Park CottonwoodThis black cottonwood is prominent in photographs taken in 1900 and 1901 to document where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place. Francis X. Matthieu, the last living participant of the 1843 vote, is shown setting the location of this site in 1900 and unveiling the monument here in the ceremony of 1901.

The area around the monument is believed to be the first land purchased by the State for a public park and was originally called Provisional Government Park, now Champoeg State Heritage Area. This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts and Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast

Sarah Helmick State Park

Sarah Helmick is located six miles south of Monmouth off Highway 99W. At this small, shady park is situated along the Luckiamute River, visitors can take a trail walk along the trails with plenty of birds and native plant life to investigate.

Sarah Helmick was the first state park established in Oregon. Its 1922 opening is considered the birth date of the Oregon State Parks system. Next time you’re there, take a moment to thank the memory of Sarah and her family for their gift
suggested lodging: MaMere’s Guest House

Cottonwood Canyon State Park

Cottonwood Canyon State Park is rugged and vast, from the vertical cliffs carved by the John Day River to deep side canyons and arid, rocky grasslands that extend for miles in all directions. The park’s 8,000-plus acres are open for exploring, stargazing and contemplating the elemental forces that carved this unique landscape.

The iconic John Day River, a long, remote, natural river system, with 252 free-flowing miles, runs through it
suggested lodging: Wilson Ranches Retreat

Mark your calendars and get ready for a special day of appreciation. State Parks Day is coming up on June 3rd, 2023 in Oregon, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to explore the beauty of the state parks.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

State Capital State Park

The variety of locales of Oregon’s State Parks and National Forests reflects our state’s diverse geography including beaches, forests, lakes, rock pinnacles and deserts. Oregon has 153 state parks, and 16 National Forests and the innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild can’t wait to share them with you.

Mark your calendars and get ready for a special day of appreciation. State Parks Day is coming up on June 3rd, 2023 in Oregon, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to explore the beauty of the state parks.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Champoeg State Park information historic marker

Magnificent Oregon Trees recognized in April leading up to Arbor Day 2023

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Provisional Government Park Cottonwood

Provisional Government Park CottonwoodThe Provisional Government Park Cottonwood is prominent in photographs taken in 1900 and 1901 to document where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place. Francis X. Matthieu, the last living participant of the 1843 vote, is shown setting the location of this site in 1900 and unveiling the monument here in the ceremony of 1901.

The area around the monument is believed to be the first land purchased by the State for a public park and was originally called Provisional Government Park, now Champoeg State Heritage Area. This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Populus trichocarpa

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 165′
  • Age: Approx 150 years
  • Circumference: 13’8″
  • Dedicated on: May 2, 2009
  • Crown: 68′

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Mark your calendars and get ready for a special day of appreciation. State Parks Day is coming up on June 3rd, 2023 in Oregon, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to explore the beauty of the state parks.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Moon Tree - Oregon State Capital State Park plaque

Moon Tree is a young Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir, raised from a seed carried to the moon by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa in 1971.
I just love this story: Moon Tree – an Oregon Heritage Tree in the Oregon State Capital State Park

Moon Tree - Oregon State Capital State Park‘The story begins in 1953 when a man named Stuart Roosa, a native of Oklahoma, took a job as a US Forest Service smokejumper, a firefighter who would parachute into the wilderness to fight forest fires. Roosa came to love the forests of Oregon, a love that he would have the rest of his life. Later, Stuart Roosa became an Air Force test pilot and eventually returned to Oregon in the 1960s to train in the moon-scape like craters of Central Oregon.

‘He was destined to become an astronaut and was scheduled to fly on Apollo 14. In those days every Apollo astronaut was permitted to take a few small personal things into space with them. What they chose varied greatly. Alan Shepard chose golf balls, John Young on Gemini 3, took a corned beef sandwich. Stuart Roosa took tree seeds. This wasn’t just a publicity stunt; it was a science project too.  Scientists wanted to know what would happen to the seeds if they went to the Moon. Would they sprout when they came back? So when Apollo 14 launched in 1971, nearly 500 tree seeds of various species were tucked away in astronaut Roosa’s personal property kit. Roosa didn’t walk on the moon since he commanded the orbiting space module, but the tree seeds did orbit the moon 34 times.

‘Upon their return to earth, many seeds were propagated and the seedlings planted in celebration of America’s bicentennial. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others.

‘Unfortunately, adequate records were not maintained at the time, so we don’t know where all the moon trees were planted. Only about 50 of them are presently accounted for, including six planted in Oregon. I’m researching their locations.

Tree Facts

  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Approx. height: 63′
  • Age: 31 years
  • Circumference: 19″
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 2003

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Willamette Mission Cottonwood

Willamette Mission Cottonwood – Populus trichocarpa

Willamette Mission Cottonwood‘This giant black cottonwood stands near the site of the Willamette Mission established by Reverend Jason Lee in 1834. At that time, the Mission and tree were located on the banks of the Willamette River. The great flood of 1861 changed the river course to its present channel, leaving what is now Mission Lake.

 

Willamette Mission CottonwoodThe Willamette Mission Cottonwood is the largest of its kind in Oregon and the nation.

Willamette Mission State Park is a gorgeous retreat for birdwatchers, horseback riders, disc golfers and kayakers. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the park marks the site of the original Willamette Mission, established in 1834 and washed away by flood in 1861. Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

  • Owens Cherry – Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853.
  • Champoeg State Heritage Area – where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place
  • Hoover-Minthorn Historic House – childhood home of Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States
  • Ewing Young Oak – ‘Ewing Young, fur trapper and trader in the Southwest and Mexico, turned settler in the Chehalem Valley in 1834.
Mark your calendars and get ready for a special day of appreciation. State Parks Day is coming up on June 3rd, 2023 in Oregon, and it’s a fantastic opportunity to explore the beauty of the state parks.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Crater lake on Oregon is Magic Roseburg Oregon

Roseburg is Magic on the Oregon Mural Trail

Crater lake on Oregon is Magic Roseburg Oregon The Umpqua Valley’s largest city, Roseburg, is an inviting destination for arts and culture and off jumping-off point for adventures. The Wild and Scenic North Umpqua River is just minutes away, where fly fishers cast lines. Along the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, known as a highway of waterfalls, visitors can encounter more than 15 dazzling cascades.

Take a downtown walking tour to learn about the historic Applegate Trail and the 1959 Roseburg Blast. The Douglas County Museum illuminates thousands of years of natural and cultural history. For another glimpse into the past, visit the nearby covered bridges nearby. Foodies will love the eateries in Roseburg and the valley’s long winemaking tradition dating back more than a century. Major Oregon attractions are an easy drive away as is iconic Crater Lake National Park. At the end of a full day rest beneath the great spreading crown of the Courthouse Elm, an Oregon Heritage Tree.

Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregon

C.H. Bailey House is nestled in Southern Oregon’s Umpqua Valley wine country. It’s Brenner Suite is a private luxurious “green” bungalow with a kitchen, queen-sized bed with luxurious linens, bathroom with walk-in shower, living room with gas fireplace, walk-in closet. Complimentary local wine and beer, and breakfast is included in the ADA accessible suite.

The Oregon Mural Trail

The captivating artwork of the Oregon Mural Trail are proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community. Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site Central and Eastern Oregon Museums

Central and Eastern Oregon Museums Worth making the trip

The Central and Eastern Oregon museums will take you back in time. A glimpse into an ever changing Oregon, it’s indigenous people, hearty immigrants, and hard working cattlemen.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute where the history, culture and hospitality of the people who have lived on this land for more than 10,000 years comes alive.  More than just a museum, Tamastslikt celebrates the traditions of Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes.

High Desert Museum, in Bend, Oregon, is nationally acclaimed and is dedicated to broadening the understanding of the High Desert’s wildlife, culture, art and natural resources.

At daily shows and demonstrations, wildlife experts will help you learn about the Museum’s more than 100 wildlife creatures — from porcupines, golden eagles and owls, to bats, lizards, snakes and spiders.   In the Birds of Prey Center you will have a rare opportunity to get a close-up look at some of nature’s fiercest predators – owls, hawks and eagles.

Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site in John Day, Oregon, is a must-see for anyone with an interest in Oregon history. This structure was built as a trading post on The Dalles Military Road in the mid-1800’s. Chinese businessman Lung On and herbal doctor Ing Hay worked out of this building. Dr. Hay administered care to the Chinese gold-mine workers, pioneers, and others from the John Day area and beyond by using traditional Chinese remedies. Built to preserve the legacy of the Chinese workforce in Oregon, the museum contains artifacts and displays that share some of the trials of everyday life of these people.

The Oregon Trail

They walked for 2,000 miles…men, women, and children by the tens of thousands. The story of this journey comes alive today through the life-size exhibits at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City.  The museum offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. Let the innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild share their knowledge of these unique museums and many other natural attractions in the beautiful and vast expanse of Eastern Oregon.

Central and Eastern Oregon; out here wide-open skies, sagebrush plains and craggy mountain ranges lay claim to the landscape. Where a spirit of adventure thrives in the high desert, filled with sunny skies and snowy peaks.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Prineville is Magic

Prineville is Magic on the Oregon Mural Trail

Prineville is MagicCentral Oregon’s oldest city, Prineville, is the gateway to the Ochoco National Forest and its half-million acres of wooded foothills, lakes and rivers. Hike, bike, fish and camp as you learn about the geographic wonders and historical content of this area. Play golf year-round at Meadow Lakes Golf Course and go boating at Prineville Reservoir State Park. Prineville has the unofficial title of Rockhound Capital of the U.S. thanks to the variety of precious gemstones found in this part of Oregon. Pick up a Rockhound Map at the Prineville Chamber of Commerce.

Prineville is home to scenic cycling paths, and ambitious road riders opt for the 37-mile Crooked River Scenic Bikeway. A walking tour of downtown leads to A.R. Bowman Museum, featuring 700+ Oregon history books, and thirst-quenching stops at Crooked River Brewing and Ochoco Brewing.

Stop off in Historic Prineville on your way to Wilson Ranches Retreat in Central Oregon.

The Oregon Mural Trail

The captivating artwork of the Oregon Mural Trail are proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community. Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Oregon White Oak a fall colors in the vineyards from the deck of Yamhill Vineyards B&B

What’s so Special About Oregon White Oaks?

The Oregon White Oak is an attractive deciduous hardwood tree native to Oregon, found as far north as British Columbia and as far south as southern California. These lovely hardwoods seem able to withstand both lengthy flooding and drought, and are most common on sites that are either too exposed or too dry for other tree species.

Mature oaks provided an abundance of food for the Kalapuya Indians, who used the tree’s acorns to make acorn meal. It’s now estimated that more than 99 percent of pre-settlement prairies and savannas in Oregon have been converted to urban areas, farms, and other developments. Oregon White Oaks provide favorable habitat to a number of important wildlife types, including the western gray squirrel, which is listed as threatened in Washington and sensitive in Oregon, and to many birds, including dark-eyed juncos, goldfinches, nuthatches, wild turkeys, and acorn and pileated woodpeckers.

Willamette Valley Oaks: Yesterday and Today

The majestic oak is an iconic symbol of the Willamette Valley with a long-standing cultural significance and valuable ecological function. The Rivers to Ridges Partnership recognizes that our remaining oak habitats and the species that depend upon them rely on the active management of both public and private lands. Learn about their common management actions being implemented in Oregon Oak habitats.

Oregon White Oaks in winter at the Yamhill Vineyards bed and brreakfast
Oregon White Oak in Winter

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Leading up to Arbor Day 2023 We’ll celebrate Oregon’s magnificent trees during the month of April

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Yamhill Vineyards Oregon White Oaks

The Oregon White Oaks growing alongside the vineyards at Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast are thought to be at least 60 years old, possibly older. Yamhill Vineyards Bed & Breakfast is a charming 2 bedroom B&B in the heart of Willamette Valley Wine Country, a secluded location among 18 acres of vineyards overlooking the Willamette Valley just outside of Carlton, Oregon.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. 

Although mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.