Category Archives: Oregon History

Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway

Traversing between Hood River and Mosier, the five mile section of the Historic Columbia River Highway passes through the Twin Tunnels and two climate zones. Being closed to auto traffic is an amazing trail for hikers, bikers, rollerbladers, anyone human powered. Starting at the east Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead near Mosier, the trail leads through semi-arid terrain dotted with ponderosa pine for about a mile until you reach the Twin Tunnels. There is an Earthcache nearby, Missoula Ice Age Floods at Mosier Syncline Flanks GC4T299, which shares information about nearby spectacular geologic formations that tell the story of the gorge’s creation.

After passing through the tunnels, you’ll emerge into a forest of fir trees and other common western Oregon plants and stunning views of the Columbia River Gorge. Viewpoints along the 3.5 mile segment from the tunnels to the west Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead overlook the river.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

The Historic Columbia River Highway

It’s that time of year again. Time to start planning that Oregon Road Trip. Oregon has more designated scenic byways and tour routes than any other state. The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is the only State B&B Association and a welcoming inn awaits you as you travel the backroads. I am presenting a series of blogs to assist you in creating amazing getaways and tours in Oregon.  Thanks Travel Oregon for sharing this information

Historic Columbia River Highway Scenic Byway Map

Construction of the Historic Columbia River Highway began in 1913 and was considered one of the greatest engineering feats of the modern age.

As its name implies, the Byway is incredibly rich in cultural history.  This stretch of the Columbia once served as fishing and meeting grounds for the many indigenous peoples of the Columbia Basin.  Oregon Trail Pioneers also traveled down the Columbia in the mid 1800s.

When the highway first opened in 1916, Teddy Roosevelt praised its scenic grandeur and remarkable engineering. And The Illustrated London News went on to call it “the king of roads.” With its mossy stone walls and graceful viaducts winding past dozens of waterfalls, this All-American Road still reigns as one of the world’s most glorious drives.’

Start planning your road trip by booking a room at either a Portland or Mt Hood Region bed and breakfast of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Say farewell to summer in extraordinary Eastern Oregon. Plan your end of summer escape that includes a stay at the Wilson Ranches Retreat, authentic Eastern Oregon Ranch.

Pioneer hospitality and an authentic ranch vacation await you at Wilson Ranches Retreat Bed & Breakfast providing exceptional lodging in central Oregon. Immerse yourself in a peaceful ranch environment rich in history and love on a 9,000 acre working cattle and hay ranch in the beautiful Butte Creek Valley, three miles west of the small town of Fossil, Oregon.

Travel the Journey Through Time Scenic Byway to Wilson Ranches Retreat and the abundant activities that await

Ranch Activities

Saddle up for a ride into the high desert hills, join in a cattle drive, hike, walk, or just plain mosey along while soaking breathtaking views and big-sky horizons in all directions. Enjoy a couple of hours in the saddle for spectacular views of the Columbia River Plateau, John Day Basin, and the Cascade Mountain Range.

Central Oregon Dude Ranch

Hike on one of the many game and cattle trails through the high desert hills surrounding Wilson Ranches Retreat. Explore miles of unique geology, flora, fauna and awe-inspiring viewpoints.

Flora and Fauna: The juniper and sage-covered high desert hills are magnificent for riding, birding, hiking, and photography. Wildflowers of lupine, mariposa lilies, Indian paintbrush and many more begin painting the range in late spring. Wilson Ranches is teeming with wildlife: Mule deer, pronghorn, elk, coyotes, badgers, squirrels, beaver, and birds of prey. Soak up nature and be replenished.

Birding: Wilson Ranches Retreat is nestled in the Butte Creek Valley and is home to Upland game birds (Chukar, Quail, and Hungarian Partridge) and birds of prey (Red-tailed Hawks, Golden Eagles, Bald Eagles, and Great Horned Owls).

Hunting: Upland game birds (Chukar, Quail, and Hungarian Partridge) hunting is available exclusively to Wilson Ranches Retreat guests from October through January.

Outdoor Activities

Explore the Natural wonders of the John Day River Territory

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The John Day Fossil Beds National Monument is a treasure of Earth’s history that covers the past 55 million years of time since the Dinosaurs died out and mammals took over the world.

Visit the Painted Hills: distinguished by varied stripes of red, tan, orange, and black, this area preserves a sequence of past climate change.

The John Day River is noted as a United States Wild and Scenic River and an Oregon Scenic Waterway and runs through the most geologically interesting country around.

For more than 50 years, people have been collecting remarkably preserved and beautiful fossils from an area behind Wheeler High School in Fossil, Oregon.

Museums and Cultural Activities

With plenty of cultural activities and museums in Oregon, there are many great ways to celebrate the heritage of the John Day River Territory! Visit museums with exhibits that tell the story of ancient fossil beds and display Native American artifacts dating back thousands of years.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

oregon trail

The Oregon Trail and Native Heritage are woven into Oregon history in many varied ways.

The Oregon Trail History

The Oregon Trail was a 2,170-mile, large-wheeled wagon route, from Independence, Missouri, to Oregon City, Oregon, used by hundreds of thousands of American pioneers to emigrate west in in the mid-1800s. The trail was filled with peril – potential accidents, ailments, and steep climbs, and crossing through Indian territories – but it paved the way for the United States to expand to the west.

Contrary to popular Hollywood depictions, most Indians were tolerant, helpful even, of the pioneer wagons that drove through their lands, at least initially. Over time, relationships between the Indians and pioneers deteriorated. The passing of the Oregon Donation Land Act, encouraged settlement into the area in 1850. Slowly relations improved. Today Interstate 84 passes through towns originally established to serve those using the Oregon Trail. There are currently nine federally recognized tribes in Oregon: Burns Paiute of Harney County; Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians; Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde; Confederated Tribes of Siletz; Confederated Tribes of Umatilla Reservation; Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Indians; Coquille Indian Tribe; and Klamath Tribes.

To learn more about Oregon’s native heritage of the land, check out:

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute, located on the Umatilla Reservation, about 15-minutes from Pendleton, is the only tribal-run museum that highlights the history and culture of Native Americans along the Oregon Trail. While there, visit the Crow’s Shadow Institute of the Arts – it’s the only fine-print studio on a reservation.

The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. The outdoor wagon encampment, trails and access to the historic ruts are open daily. Located five miles east of Baker City, on Highway 86, Exit 302 from Interstate 84, 125 miles northwest of Boise, 95 miles southeast of Pendleton.

The Museum at Warm Springs houses a large collection of North American Indian artifacts. 2189 US-26 in Warm Springs.

Chachalu Museum and Cultural Center tells the story of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde — the community, Tribe, and culture that has persisted despite the challenges. 9615 Grand Ronde Road
In Grand Ronde.

The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Center for Native American Art at the Portland Art Museum has a Native American art collection with 3,500 prehistoric and historic objects created by some 200 cultural groups from throughout North America. 1219 SW Park Avenue in Portland.

Our Oregon Trail of Waterfalls map leads you on an Oregon road trip to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon. View a digital version of the map

oregon waterfalls map request

We look forward to seeing you on the Oregon Trail!

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

The Oregon Mural Trail – Ontario Oregon

The featured mural is in Ontario’s Red Apple Mall. At Oregon’s eastern edge and in a different time zone, Ontario is the gateway to desert beauty, stunning river canyons and towering mountain ranges. Any time of year, this little town is a great sunny destination and basecamp to outdoor adventures at the Owyhee Canyonlands, Lake Owyhee, Pillars of Rome and more. Make time for Four Rivers Cultural Center and Museum, which honors the area’s cultural heritage, Native American, Basque, European, Hispanic and Japanese.

The videos of Travel Oregon’s Oregon, Only Slightly Exaggerated reveal whimsical scenes of enchanting forests, vineyards, rivers, mountains and more, and share with you that magical feeling of being in Oregon.

Now the captivating artwork is coming to the real world, proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community.  Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.  And while you’re there, visit the landmarks and businesses that make these towns just so magical.

There are several Oregon Trail Sites sights in this eastern corner of Oregon. The National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. From the top of Flagstaff Hill you can still see the trail running out across the plains.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

The Clock is Ticking on these Deals

Roseburg is Magic on the Oregon Mural Trail

Roseburg is MagicThe Umpqua Valley’s largest city, Roseburg, is an inviting destination for arts and culture and off jumping-off point for adventures. The Wild and Scenic North Umpqua River is just minutes away, where fly fishers cast lines. Along the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, known as a highway of waterfalls, visitors can encounter more than 15 dazzling cascades.

Take a downtown walking tour to learn about the historic Applegate Trail and the 1959 Roseburg Blast. The Douglas County Museum illuminates thousands of years of natural and cultural history. For another glimpse into the past, visit the nearby covered bridges nearby. Foodies will love the eateries in Roseburg and the valley’s long winemaking tradition dating back more than a century. Major Oregon attractions are an easy drive away as is iconic Crater Lake National Park. At the end of a full day rest beneath the great spreading crown of the Courthouse Elm, an Oregon Heritage Tree.

C.H. Bailey House is nestled in Southern Oregon’s Umpqua Valley wine country. It’s Brenner Suite is a private luxurious “green” bungalow with a kitchen, queen-sized bed with luxurious linens, bathroom with walk-in shower, living room with gas fireplace, walk-in closet. Complimentary local wine and beer, and breakfast is included in the ADA accessible suite.

The captivating artwork of the Oregon Mural Trail are proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community. Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Prineville is Magic

Prineville is Magic on the Oregon Mural Trail

Prineville is MagicCentral Oregon’s oldest city, Prineville, is the gateway to the Ochoco National Forest and its half-million acres of wooded foothills, lakes and rivers. Hike, bike, fish and camp as you learn about the geographic wonders and historical content of this area. Play golf year-round at Meadow Lakes Golf Course and go boating at Prineville Reservoir State Park. Prineville has the unofficial title of Rockhound Capital of the U.S. thanks to the variety of precious gemstones found in this part of Oregon. Pick up a Rockhound Map at the Prineville Chamber of Commerce.

Prineville is home to scenic cycling paths, and ambitious road riders opt for the 37-mile Crooked River Scenic Bikeway. A walking tour of downtown leads to A.R. Bowman Museum, featuring 700+ Oregon history books, and thirst-quenching stops at Crooked River Brewing and Ochoco Brewing.

Stop off in Historic Prineville on your way to Wilson Ranches Retreat in Central Oregon.

The Oregon Mural Trail

The captivating artwork of the Oregon Mural Trail are proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community. Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest

Four County PointWe all know the another Four Corners in America that is a big-time tourist destination. That would be the only place where four state boundaries meet: Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

In Oregon, our Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest notes the meeting of Clatsop, Columbia, Washington and Tillamook counties. A stone sunk into the Coast Range forest, not far off U.S. 26, marks the only place in Oregon where four county points meet.

Hike the Four County Point Trail

Four County Point is located on US Highway 26 and we invite you to take a moderate 1 mile hike hike through a Douglas Fir Forest on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

Bonus: for those searching geocaches – 4 – Corners Oregon geocache GCAD7A

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Willamette Stone

The Willamette Stone was a small stone obelisk originally installed by the Department of Interior in 1885

The Willamette Stone Heritage Site is located in the west hills of Portland, Oregon.  The surveys completed from this location promoted settlement of the Northwest and began the transfer of land from government ownership to private ownership.

The first marker, placed in 1851, a simple cedar stake, was replaced with a small stone obelisk in 1885.  In 1945 the property was purchased to preserve and protect the origin point of the land survey system for Oregon and Washington. A stainless-steel marker, set into the original obelisk, was rededicated in 1988.

The Willamette Meridian is one of 37 principal meridians in the United States.  All land surveys and property descriptions in the states of Oregon and Washington are referenced at this point. The Willamette meridian runs north-south, and the Willamette baseline runs east-west through the marker.

The Willamette Valley marks the end of the Oregon Trail and the history of that migration can be discovered at heritage sites, museums, and cemeteries across the region. Known for its premium wines, craft breweries, cideries, meaderies and distilleries the Willamette Valley is also home to unique, one-of-a-kind Bed and Breakfasts awaiting your visit.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Grand Fir

Grand Fir at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast

Grand Fir

The Grand Fir at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast, Abies grandis, was planted in front of  Charles and Lillian Craven’s new home in 1910. The Craven House was built in the fertile valley on the north slope of Mt. Hood. The home was converted into a bed and breakfast in 1998

Tree Facts

Grand Fir
  • Approx. height: 140′
  • Age: 112 years
  • Circumference: 15′
  • Abies grandis

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ve recognized some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month.

Hope you’ve enjoyed learning about the history of these trees and their contribution to our Oregon History and Culture.

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild took the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. We won’t stop here. So many more Oregon Heritage Trees we’ll be out and about searching for more Many of the trees we highlighted, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.