Tag Archives: oregon waterfalls

Steelhead Falls and waterfall wednesday

Steelhead Falls and Waterfall Wednesday in Oregon

Steelhead Falls It’s only about a half mile from the trailhead to Steelhead Falls on the Deschutes River in Central Oregon. But in geologic time, it’s a few million years. Colorful grooves decorate cliffs and show the erosion of time. Wildflowers dot the slopes in the spring and golden eagles soar overhead. Hike down for a picnic, fish in the Deschutes River and explore the rocky shores. A serene spot to let the sound of the falls erase the world around you.

Oregon B&Bs Draw Doodle Map of Must-See State Waterfalls for Socially-Distant Adventures

The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is putting pen to paper to draw a doodle map and encourage you to fill your tanks, hit the road, and seize the summer – one waterfall at a time.

The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls, as it will be called, will be a beautiful, limited edition, double-sided map. The huge piece of art measuring 24-inches across and 18-inch down will be carefully folded and mailed free-of-charge to travelers upon request, while supplies last.

The map will also highlight various bits of information, like the many Oregon food trails and pods, Instagram-worthy drives, popular in-state movie spots, and scenic bikeways.

Watch this space for the map release is coming soon. Or if you’d like to request one hot off the press email us at info@obbg.org to get on our mailing list.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate for fully vaccinated individuals and while Oregon is following this guidance, some inns may still be requiring masks to be worn in some situations. Please check with individual B&Bs to inquire about their specific policies. Each Oregon county, depending on its vaccination and case numbers, are also adjusting their regulations accordingly. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of our individual counties, inns and businesses. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

oregon waterfalls

Come feel the mist of Oregon waterfalls on your face!

Oregon has more than 238 waterfalls across the state (and 1,000+ according to the Northwest Waterfalls Survey).You basically can’t drive more than 30-minutes without passing another waterfall! The Columbia River Gorge has close to 50 notable waterfalls alone… so where should you go? We’ve come up with a list of 66 must-see waterfalls (it’s really more like 80 since we grouped some together).

Here’s our list of must-see Oregon waterfalls by region. Beside each waterfall you’ll see a number. That’s the number we’ve assigned to the waterfall on our humongous The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls map. If you haven’t sent in your request to receive a free map, fill out this form below and we’ll mail one to you (in the mail, with a stamp — free to you). If you prefer to view a digital version of the map or if you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, click here.

oregon waterfalls map request

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OREGON CASCADE WATERFALLS
Ramona Falls (W17): This shaded waterfall is in a forest along the Pacific Crest Trail on the upper Sandy River — on the west side of Mount Hood. The falls are about 120 feet tall, consisting of a wall of cascades. Click to learn more about Ramona Falls. Thinking of hiking there? Check out how these bloggers went about their trek.

oregon cascade waterfalls

Tamanawas Falls (W18): Bring your binoculars and prepare to see a lot of birds and a stunning waterfall! The falls are AMAZING at 100 feet high and 40 feet wide. The trailhead footbridge is the midpoint of a 8-mile stretch of the East Fork of the Hood River hosting nesting Harlequin Ducks. Belted Kingfisher are common but it’s the songbirds you’re likely to remember long after they’ve sung their tunes.

Little Zig Zag River Falls (W19): One of Oregon’s hidden gems. A picturesque stream leads to a photogenic waterfall on this family-friendly trail; complete with a picnic table at the very start. It couldn’t be more perfect. If you go, read this first.

Yocum Falls (W20): This waterfall is right in the heart of the Mount Hood National Forest. It sits in Zigzag canyon with many waterfalls, including Little Zigzag River Falls and Ramona Falls. Want to hike there? Here’s how this couple did it.

Pencil Falls (W21): This glacier-fed waterfall is in the alpine area of Mount Hood Meadows. A small path leads to a great viewing.

Upper Heather Canyon Falls (W22): Where the Timberline Trail crosses Heather Creek, is thought to be one of the most scenic areas of Mount Hood. In Heather Canyon a series of waterfalls tumbles beneath this trail.

Umbrella Falls (W23): This popular and family-friendly waterfall is accessible from scenic hiking trails. Look up! You’ll see a chair lift too. Click here to read all about the hike.

White River Falls (W33): The waterfall is the main focus of the White River Falls State Park and for good reason — the scenic White River plunges 90-feet from a basalt shelf. It’s been written up in many books too, see the titles here.

Tamolitch Falls (W45): Follow the McKenzie river through the old growth forest to Tamolitch Falls, which flows into a lava formed Blue Pool, renowned for its iridescent blue coloring. Want to see it for yourself? Here’s what you need to know.

cascade waterfalls oregon

Sahalie Falls (W46): Sahalie Falls, is the first and tallest of three waterfalls on the roaring McKenzie River. It plunges about 100 feet over a naturally formed lava dam. Here’s how to hike there.

Koosah Falls (W47): Koosah Falls, aka Middle Falls, is the second of the three major waterfalls of the McKenzie River, in the center of the Willamette National Forest. The waterfall plunges into a pool, south of Santiam Pass, a renowned 4,817-foot mountain pass in the Cascade Range. Visit with time to make the most of the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail and other nearby activities.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

CENTRAL AND EASTERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Hurricane Creek Falls (W24): Hurricane Creek Falls are located along granite and limestone cliffs and an incredible amount of wildflowers along the Hurricane Creek Trailhead at Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

Falls Creek Falls (W25): This is one of the prettiest waterfalls in the Pacific Northwest! Come see three tiers of this waterfall drop 335-ft and decide for yourself.

BC Creek Falls (W26): Located near Wallowa State Park, BC Creek Falls (W26) lies within the Chief Joseph Mountain Trail, approximately an 8-mile out-and-back trail near Joseph. In less than 3-miles on the trail you’ll find two rivers and Wallowa Lake views, in addition to the falls. Click here to print a map to the trail.

Wallowa Falls (W27): Take Chief Joseph Trail to Wallowa Falls (and BC Falls – just a few miles away). Wallowa falls seems more like a long rapid but its location, nested in a deep gorge is beautiful. While in the area, check out the new Wallowa Falls Campground and enjoy a picnic with a view!

John Day River (W37): This is the longest un-dammed river in Oregon. The section between Service Creek and Tumwater Falls flows through a colorful canyons and beautiful terrain. Want to spend a few days exploring this area? You’ll find a 3-day itinerary here.

Steelhead Falls (W48): Formed a few million years ago, this Oregon waterfall is lined by colorful 25-foot cliffs. The fall drops into a deep canyon. It’s a popular go-to destination for swimming and cliff jumping.

Tumalo Falls (W53): Tumalo Falls is both the tallest, 89 feet, and most impressive waterfall along Tumalo Creek – as well as one of the most popular outdoor destinations in the vicinity of Bend. Learn more here.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

Benham Falls (W58): These are the largest falls on the upper Deschutes River. Unlike the other falls the area, Benham Falls is not related to a lava flow. It is a free-form cascade in its own right. Here’s how to hike there.

Fall River Falls (W59): A trail passes by historic cabin ruins and parallels the Fall River all the way to the falls. It’s a popular fly fishing spot.

McKay Crossing Falls (W60): This 23-foot waterfall plunges into a small canyon with several picture-ready viewpoints. Check out these photos.

Paulina Creek Falls (W61): This waterfall is known for its side-by-side drop of 80-feet that surrounds a small island at the edge of the cliff. Here’s where to get the best view.

oregon waterfalls

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

COLUMBIA GORGE WATERFALLS
Bridal Veil (W8): Hidden beneath the Historic Columbia River Highway, this small two-tiered waterfall is easy to reach. Make sure to check out the romantic messages carved into the handrails of the viewpoint. See part of the trail now.

Wiesendanger Falls (W9): Named after Forest Service Ranger, Albert Wiesendanger, the 55-foot falls are also known as Upper Multnomah Falls, Twanklaskie Falls, and Double Falls (the latter together with Ecola Falls). Learn more about Wiesendanger Falls here.

Ponytail Falls (W10): Ponytail Falls, also known as Upper Horsetail Falls, is on Horsetail Creek just above Horsetail Falls. This is one of the more popular waterfalls for professional photographers, for stunning pictures looking out from behind the falls. See a ‘behind’ shot.

Elowah Falls (W11): Elowah Falls drops 289 feet into an amphitheater of lava flows of millions of years ago. Please note: The trail to the bottom of Elowah Falls is closed until further notice due to a massive landslide that buried the trail and bridge across McCord Creek but you can still see Elowah Falls from the McCord Falls trail.

Wahclella Falls (W12): OregonHikers.org describes this fall as one of the more interesting falls in the Columbia River Gorge. It runs along Tanner Creek and features two drops.

Starvation Creek Falls (W13): This waterfall is an anomaly in that it’s a manmade waterfall! Highway crews created tunnel through the rock to divert Warren Creek here in the 2930s and solve an issue with the creek and the highway. The water shoots out from a long tunnel and, well, falls… creating Starvation Creek Falls. Read all about it!

Historic Columbia River Highway waterfalls — including Multnomah Falls, Horsetail Falls, Latourell Falls, and Wahkeena Falls; W14): You can tour the waterfalls that make up the Columbia River Gorge by car or on foot, but you won’t have the full-on spectacular experience unless you do both. Whatever you do, make sure to save time to see Multnomah Falls. It is the most visited natural recreation site in the Pacific Northwest and more than 2 million visitors come each year to take in its view. Before you go, print this map of a waterfall tour loop on the Historic Columbia River Highway.

historic columbia river highway waterfalls

Ecola Falls (W15): Ecola Falls is the last major of the falls as you travel upstream on the Larch Mountain Trail. What does ecola mean? It’s the Chinook word for whale.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

OREGON COAST RANGE
Bridge Creek Falls (W5): This three tier fall has a 35-ft drop and is right near Highway 6 by the Footbridge Trailhead. Learn more.

Fern Rock Falls (W6): An understated and beautiful waterfall along Highway 6.

University Falls (W7): Located within an area that was devastated by one of the worst forest fires in Oregon’s history, this forest was rehabilitated, trees were planted (more than 70 million!) and the Tillamook State Forest began. University Falls is a 55-ft fall over a wall of basalt. Check out what this hiker had to say while on the quest to take the family holiday photo by the fall.

Green Peak Falls (W41): This is the second waterfall on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. First, you’ll see Alsea Falls. While most people tend to stop there, there’s a second waterfall, just as beautiful but larger, father ahead. Keep going, you’ll likely find a magical moment of solace and beauty.

Alsea Falls (W42): This is the namesake and the first of two cascades on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. It’s stunning, quick, and easy to reach. See some pics!

oregon coast waterfalls

Sweet Creek Falls (W49): Four tiered-plunges from varying heights cascade for about 70-feet, making an impressive multi-waterfall effect. Bring your camera!

Beaver Creek Falls (W50): If there were a meet cute for waterfalls, this would be it. Beaver Creek is a small waterfall where Beaver Creek and Sweet Creek meet and intertwine into one. Even the two names are movie-esque! Take a peek at some of the trail.

Lower Kentucky Falls (W51): The Kentucky Falls Trailhead has three falls. First comes Upper Kentucky Falls, then 2-miles later through an old growth forest you’ll see spectacular twin falls plunging 100 feet, they are: Lower Kentucky Falls and North Fork of the Smith Falls.

Upper Kentucky Falls (W52): The Upper Kentucky Falls is the first of three spectacular waterfalls on the Kentucky Falls Trailhead.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

SOUTHERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls (Susan Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls, Watson Falls, Toketee Falls, Clearwater Falls; W55):
You can tour all the waterfalls that make up the Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls while you picnic and hike or you can focus on the favorites we listed here. Your choice!

Diamond Creek Falls (W56): There’s a reason Diamond Creek Falls and its graceful cliffside drop is thought of as one of the prettiest waterfalls in Oregon. Come see for yourself!

Salt Creek Falls (W57): This is a popular stop for travelers on Highway-58. It’s also the second highest waterfall in Oregon. Get the insider’s scoop on the viewing platform.

Rogue River Gorge Falls (W63): At the head of the gorge you’ll find this waterfall, right where the river splits around volcanic rock. The view is stunning and made even better by the surrounding forest.

Prospect Waterfalls (Pearsony Falls, Barr Creek Falls, Prospect Falls, Mill Creek Falls; W64): This series of cascades follow the Rogue River just outside the town of Prospect. The river drops and ricochets until it hits a stretch of boulders.

southern oregon waterfalls

Klamath Falls (W66): Define waterfall? That’s what you might think when you see the falls of Klamath Falls. They’re more of a set of whitewater rapids. And yet, they’re beautiful and worth the trek.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

OREGON COAST WATERFALLS
Youngs River Falls (W1): Grab your bathing suit! This 50-foot waterfall is a popular swimming spot during the summer months.

Hug Point Falls (W3): This waterfall sits at a beach and is surrounded by several caves. It’s name has an interesting backstory too.

Blumenthal Falls (W4): This is one of the few waterfalls in the Northwest that you can see fall into the Pacific Ocean without needing any help from a boat, thank you.

Munson Creek Falls (W28): Whoa! This is the tallest waterfall in the Coast Range — tumbling 319 feet over several tiers. A small trail winds along the Munson Creek through an old-growth forest to find the base of the fall.

munson creek falls

Upton Falls (W29): Something fishy? Well, maybe fish-related at least. This fall was the upstream limit of migration for native fish but the falls have been altered to include a fish ladder and a dam to divert the water too. Read more on its history here. See spectacular photos here.

Drift Creek Falls (W34): The 240-foot suspension bridge (the longest in all of Oregon!) crosses the canyon beside the 8-ft falls, making this waterfall excursion unlike any other.

Rocky Creek Falls (W38): Pull off Highway 101 and you’re likely to see these easy-to-reach and easy-to-spot falls. They spill right into the Pacific Ocean. Get driving directions here.

Golden Falls (W54): Did you know that if you hike a little over a mile to the top of Golden Falls you can see a bird’s-eye view of the waterfall, firs, and cedars. That’s something to write home about! Golden Falls is the third tallest waterfall in the Oregon Coast Range.

Elk Creek Falls (W62): It may be last but it’s not least. Elk Creek Falls is the final of about a dozen significant waterfalls situated within the Elk Creek basin. It is also the only waterfall among those with easy or developed access of any kind. It’s made up of four tiers in a narrow and twisty canyon. Read this first-hand account of getting to Elk Creek.

Secret Beach Falls (W65): Shh… it’s called a secret because it’s hard to find but here’s the skinny. Tucked into the northern-most end where the Oregon Coast Trail squishes between the road and the overlook to Thunder Rock Cove, you’ll find a nearby trail that leads to a small beach with a waterfall. Use this to plan your trip.

[Click here now to get a FREE limited edition map of The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls mailed to your home, while supplies last. If you’re outside the U.S. or Canada, or wish to see a digital version of the map now, click here to see the map online.]

WILLAMETTE VALLEY WATERFALLS
Beaver Falls (W2): Beaver Falls spills from a lip of basalt into a turquoise-colored pool. Some say that if you come at the right time, you’ll see rainbows in the mist. The best part, if you’re on a mission to see many waterfalls, Beaver Falls is one you can spot from the road if you’d rather not walk the trail.

Willamette Falls (W16): This horseshoe-shaped block waterfall is created by a basalt shelf in the river bottom. It’s fall is 42 ft high and 1,500-ft -wide and set the record for being the largest waterfall by water volume in the Northwest and also for being the 18th largest by volume. Surrounding the falls are the locks, which are the oldest continuously operating multi-lift lock and canal system in all of the United States.

willamette falls

INSIDER TIP! If you want to see a boat go through the locks, call the lockmaster’s office at 503-656-3381 and they can tell you when boats are scheduled to go through. Click here to download information on the Willamette Falls Locks curated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Learn even more through The Willamette Falls Heritage Foundation, whose on a mission to preserve and share stories of people and the power of the water at the great falls of the Willamette River.

Niagara Falls (W30) and Pheasant Creek Falls (W31): Follow the foliage then cross not one wooden bridge but FOUR — each with a magnificent view of two 100-ft waterfalls: Niagara Falls and Pheasant Creek Falls. Click here for more details and here for a trail map.

Scotts Mills Falls (W32): Scotts Mills Falls is a small fall with big popularity. It sits at the site of a former flour mill and cascades through a rocky cliff into the large swimming hole.

Falls City Falls (W35): Falls City Falls are at the center of Falls City. In fact, Falls City is named after the falls. In the past, this was a lumbermill town.

Trail of Ten Falls at Silver Falls State Park (W36): This is Oregon’s largest State Park, coming in at 9,000-acres. It also has one of the most impressive waterfall day-hikes in the United States! Well, there are at least 10 spectacular falls within this 7.8 mile-loop. Here’s what you need to know before you go.

Parker Creek Falls (W39): To see Parker Falls you’ll need to work your way through the Parker Falls Trail. The rewards are huge! You’ll see a series of waterfalls, pools and cascades nestled in a forest of Douglas fir. Get more specifics here.

Alder Creek Falls (W40): Just east of Sweethome, Alder Creek Falls is on the way to Marys Peak, a must-see destination and the highest point in Oregon’s Coast Range. Download a Marys Peak Trail Guide here.

Royal Terrace Falls (W43): Royal Terrace Falls is the biggest of the four falls at McDowell Creek Falls Park though it’s also the lowest-volume. A sign nailed to a nearby tree says the falls drop 119 feet. The falls happen where Fall Creek drops over the valley into a whimsical stair-step type of display that also allow for an experiential component.

Majestic Falls (W44): This 39-ft waterfall is arguably the most beautiful of McDowell Creek Park. There are staircases with nearly 70 steps that let you explore the cascading waterfall from different vantage points.

willamette valley waterfalls

Which Oregon waterfalls will you visit? Click here to find the best Oregon bed and breakfast nearby for your specific travel dates and preferences.


NEXT: Click on each image below to create your own epic Oregon road trip! Click here to view a digital map with interactive links.

The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon!


POPULAR QUESTIONS ABOUT OREGON WATERFALLS 

What is the largest waterfall in Oregon?
Multnomah Falls is the largest waterfall in Oregon. More specifically, it’s the tallest waterfall in Oregon, measuring 611-ft.

How many waterfalls are there in Oregon?
There are at least 238 waterfalls in the state of Oregon. The Northwest Waterfalls Survey estimates more than 1,000.

How many waterfalls are in Silver Falls State Park in Oregon?
There are a total of 17 waterfalls in Silver Falls State Park in Oregon. In fact, the Trail of Ten Falls loop will take you above, around, and even behind 4 of the 10 waterfalls.


Did we miss any must-see Oregon waterfalls? Please let us know!

Willamette Falls is the largest waterfall by volume in the Northwest, dropping 42 feet over a horseshoe-shaped ledge with a crest length of approximately 1,500 feet.

According to Oregon Geographic Names, the Willamette River was named for an Indian settlement somewhere in the vicinity of Oregon City known as “Wal-lamt”, which may have meant “spill water”, a reference to the falls.

There are several viewpoints of the falls available, mostly from above. But we found the most exciting and up-close view of The Falls was on a jet boat excursion on the Willamette River. Take the 32-mile trip up and down the Willamette River to the majestic Willamette Falls.

The Fulton House Bed and Breakfast, located in Southwest Portland and one block from Willamette Park and the Willamette River and the Willamette Greenway.

With mass transportation nearby you can set out to explore Portland, visit the famous medical facilities at the Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) via the Portland Aerial Tram up “Pill Hill”, or take a jet boat tour up river to Willamette Falls.

Our Chasing Waterfalls and Oregon Waterfall Wednesdays series continues. According to Northwest Waterfall Survey there are well over 1000 waterfalls in Oregon! We’ve set out to witness the beauty of as many as we can. We’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

You can Chase Oregon Waterfalls with us by following our Pinterest and Facebook pages.

Oregon B&Bs Draw Doodle Map of Must-See State Waterfalls for Socially-Distant Adventures

The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is putting pen to paper to draw a doodle map and encourage you to fill your tanks, hit the road, and seize the summer – one waterfall at a time.

The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls, as it will be called, will be a beautiful, limited edition, double-sided map. The huge piece of art measuring 24-inches across and 18-inch down will be carefully folded and mailed free-of-charge to travelers upon request, while supplies last.

The map will also highlight various bits of information, like the many Oregon food trails and pods, Instagram-worthy drives, popular in-state movie spots, and scenic bikeways.

Watch this space for the map release is coming soon. Or if you’d like to request one hot off the press email us at info@obbg.org to get on our mailing list.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

McKenzie River Valley

Sahalie Falls, is the first and tallest of three waterfalls on the roaring McKenzie River.

‘The falls plunge a sheer 73 feet over an overhanging exposure of basalt into a huge basin which captures the mist ejected from the falls and turns it into a hurricane directed straight at the viewpoints for the falls just downstream’. Sahalie is a Chinook jargon word meaning “high”.

Sahalie Falls

Our Chasing Waterfalls and Oregon Waterfall Wednesdays series continues. According to Northwest Waterfall Survey there are well over 1000 waterfalls in Oregon! We’ve set out to witness the beauty of as many as we can. We’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

You can Chase Oregon Waterfalls with us by following our Pinterest and Facebook pages.

In the Willamette Valley you can spend your entire day doing nothing. Relax on a comfortable front porch at one of 14 bed and breakfasts or in their gardens. Or head out on a day trip to explore the lush McKenzie River, located among old growth forest, waterfalls, mosses, ferns and brilliant blue pools of water.

Oregon B&Bs Draw Doodle Map of Must-See State Waterfalls for Socially-Distant Adventures

The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is putting pen to paper to draw a doodle map and encourage you to fill your tanks, hit the road, and seize the summer – one waterfall at a time.

The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls, as it will be called, will be a beautiful, limited edition, double-sided map. The huge piece of art measuring 24-inches across and 18-inch down will be carefully folded and mailed free-of-charge to travelers upon request, while supplies last.

The map will also highlight various bits of information, like the many Oregon food trails and pods, Instagram-worthy drives, popular in-state movie spots, and scenic bikeways.

Watch this space for the map release is coming soon. Or if you’d like to request one hot off the press email us at info@obbg.org to get on our mailing list.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Little Multnomah Falls

Little Multnomah Falls is just upstream from its bigger, and slightly more famous sibling Multnomah Falls but stunning in its simple beauty.

Multnomah Creek traverses a flat shelf to create 15 foot Little Multnomah Falls, seen from the viewing platform above Multnomah Falls, before leveling off and plunging over the basalt edge into the Columbia River Gorge. Travel upstream and chase 3 more waterfalls. Make the 6 mile loop and discover 7 waterfalls total. Check trail status before you go.

And thus start a series of blog posts, Chasing Waterfalls and Oregon Waterfall Wednesdays. According to Northwest Waterfall Survey there are well over 1000 waterfalls in Oregon! We’ve set out to witness the beauty of as many as we can. We’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

You can Chase Oregon Waterfalls with us by following our Pinterest and Facebook pages. The heart of the Columbia River Gorge is located just a 30-minute drive from Portland or Hood River and bed and breakfast of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: We all may be a little rusty, and a little leery, on planning trips just yet. And while it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, we’re ready when you are! Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe and welcome you back. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

C.H. Bailey House

C.H. Bailey House is nestled in Southern Oregon’s Umpqua Valley wine country. It’s Brenner Suite is a private luxurious “green” bungalow with a kitchen, queen-sized bed with luxurious linens, bathroom with walk-in shower, living room with gas fireplace, walk-in closet. Complimentary local wine and beer, and breakfast is included in the ADA accessible suite. 

The historic C.H. Bailey House and barn, built in 1909, and the beautifully manicured grounds offer a truly extraordinary romantic setting for your wedding or any other special celebration. You will find lots of idyllic country views, numerous places to sit, read, relax, chat, eat, drink, and be very merry. There are two groomed Italian bocce courts; play with a glass of wine or beer in your hand!

Day trips from C.H. Bailey House takes you to dozens of hiking trails and waterfalls along the famous Umpqua River. Visit award winning wineries and breweries, drive through world-renowned Wildlife Safari, or just relax and rejuvenate.

C.H. Bailey House can be your starting, or ending, place while touring the Rogue – Umpqua Scenic Byway. More commonly known as the ‘highway of waterfalls’, the Rogue – Umpqua Scenic Byway ascends from I-5 into the southern Cascades, tracking two of Oregon’s most storied rivers.’ From Gold Hill on the Rogue River in Southern Oregon or from Roseburg on the Umpqua River 85 miles north you’re only moments from enjoying this spectacular route. Follow the “Wild and Scenic” Umpqua and Rogue rivers through enchanting recreation areas in the heart of the southern Cascades.’

“Absolutely perfect….more than 5 Stars! I seldom write reviews for anything, but our stay at the CHBH is worth writing about. The occasion was our 30th Wedding Anniversary, so everything had to be perfect.” a Tripadvisor contributor.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Oregon is one of the top states where it looks like social distancing is working. Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe, welcome you back, when you’re ready to travel again. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Pumpkin Pinots Pears

Serving up Pears at an Oregon Bed and Breakfast

Imagine waking up in the morning to the slight scent of fresh brewed coffee, muffins baking in the oven and knowing someone has already been up for hours just to prepare breakfast for you. That’s what you can look forward to when visiting one of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild inns.

We recently asked our innkeepers to submit their favorite recipes and were pleased to see that once again, we are all about keeping it local and fresh. The recipe that follows is made with pears. Did you know that 84% of the nation’s pears are grown in Oregon and Washington? The volcanic soil provides pear tree nourishment, the rain and snowmelt provides moisture and of course our ideal temperature is a huge factor.

Mary and Steve Pellegrini have owned the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast in the Hood River Valley for over 17 years. Their recipe using Bosc pears is easy, tasty, and the presentation is gorgeous. She calls it, “Microwave Poached Bosc Pears with Raspberry Sauce”

  • peel one ripe pear per person but leave the stem on
  • cut a small slice from the bottom of pears to flatten so they stand upright
  • put pears in a microwave safe dish and pour one tablespoon of maple syrup over each one
  • cover and microwave about one and half minutes per pear until hot
  • place pears on individual small plates and pour about one tablespoon raspberry syrup over each pear
  • garnish with raspberries

If you are planning a trip to Oregon’s Mt Hood Region, stay with Pellegrini’s at the Old Parkdale Inn. We’re sure after 17 years of innkeeping, they has more wonderful breakfast recipes to share with you.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

The videos of Travel Oregon’s Oregon, Only Slightly Exaggerated reveal whimsical scenes of enchanting forests, vineyards, rivers, mountains and more, and share with you that magical feeling of being in Oregon.

The captivating artwork has come to the real world, proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations.  Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community.  Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.  And while you’re there, visit the landmarks and businesses that make these towns just so magical.

You’ll be charmed by nature and outdoor adventure in Oakridge, Oregon.  Nestled in a thickly forested Willamette Valley wonderland at the western foot of the Cascades and dubbed the “Mountain Bike Capital of the Northwest,” Oakridge has hundreds of miles of singletrack trails, many of which start and end in the city. There are also trails for hiking and horseback riding, plus excellent trout fishing for anglers. East of town, a short hike leads to Salt Creek Falls, Oregon’s second highest single-drop waterfall.  The bright red Office Covered Bridge is an iconic landmark.

A few weeks back we set out on a road trip, seeking waterfalls, geocaches, covered bridges and this mural, all along Hwy 58 outside of Eugene. There are 20 covered bridges in Lane County, a county that has the distinction of possessing more covered bridges than any other county west of the Mississippi.  Only got to roadside waterfalls and geocaches but did find the 6 covered bridges on our way to Oakridge, including the Office Covered Bridge mentioned.  You could easily explore this area from C’est La Vie Bed and Breakfast in Eugene as your home base. Take a couple of days to discover all this lush part of Oregon has to offer.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Lower McDowell Creek Falls

Lower McDowell Creek Falls this Waterfall Wednesday

Lower McDowell Creek Falls is one of four falls we found in the McDowell Creek Falls County Park.  Picnic while hiking three miles of trails in this lush green park, with bridges and viewing decks along McDowell Creek. We visited as a side trip off of the Over the Rivers and Through the Woods Scenic Byway

You can Chase Waterfalls with us by subscribing to this blog, follow us on Pinterest, and on our Facebook Page.  According to Wiki there are at least 238 waterfalls in Oregon!  I’m guessing even more than that.  Wouldn’t it be grand to witness the beauty of every one of them?  With 77 waterfalls on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge alone, we’ve set out to find them all plus those in the nearby Mt Hood National Forest, Washington and beyond. And when we do we’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Cavitt Falls

Cavitt Falls in Douglas County, Oregon

‘Cavitt Falls is modest little cascade along Cavitt Creek located within a BLM campground near Glide. The falls consist or one or two channels depending on how much water is in the creek, and drops all of about 8 feet into a large pool (great swimming). I’m fairly certain there are probably half a dozen or more larger waterfalls elsewhere on Cavitt Creek that would be more interesting. Bottom line is this one is of minimal interest outside of having a great swimming hole.’  Text from Northwest Waterfall Survey

You can Chase Waterfalls with us by subscribing to this blog, follow us on Pinterest, and on our Facebook Page.  According to Wiki there are at least 238 waterfalls in Oregon!  I’m guessing even more than that.  Wouldn’t it be grand to witness the beauty of every one of them?  With 77 waterfalls on the Oregon side of the Columbia River Gorge alone, we’ve set out to find them all plus those in the nearby Mt Hood National Forest, Washington and beyond. And when we do we’ll share our finds with you, our guests, so you too can set out to Chase Waterfalls.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.