Tag Archives: willamette Valley

National Strawberries and Cream

National Strawberries and Cream Day is May 21

National Strawberries and Cream Day is May 21.  We think you’ll love this tasty French Toast

Strawberry Croissant French Toast

4 large day-old croissants
¾ c. milk
2 large eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla
½ teaspoon cinnamon
2 Tablespoons butter
Powdered Sugar
Sweetened Whipped Cream
Fresh Strawberries

Slice croissants in half lengthwise.  Whisk together milk, eggs, vanilla, and cinnamon. Pour into a shallow dish.  Dip croissant halves into eggs mixture, coating well.

Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add four croissant halves and cook about 2 minutes on each side or until golden brown.

Repeat procedure with remaining butter and croissant halves. Spoon strawberries between the layers and some on top. Sprinkle with powdered sugar, top with sweetened whipped cream if desired. Who wouldn’t want sweetened whipped cream and maybe a splash of maple syrup!

Oregon Berry Season has arrived and you’ll find many sweet berry dishes being served at the Inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

MaMere's Guest House

MaMere’s Guest House and Event Center in the Heart of Oregon’s Wine Country

MaMere’s Guest House is located in the heart of wine county, and is the perfect place to call home while you explore the surrounding wineries or visiting Western Oregon University.  The property is on the National Register of Historic Places and is only a block from WOU and Monmouth’s Main Street.

MaMere’s Guest House is charming, unique and colorful inside and out! Built in 1891 as a boarding house for female students, it has since housed hundreds and continues to do so today in its present form as a Bed and Breakfast Guest House.  From the Inn tour local vineyards, visit the coast, or just relax and enjoy a glass of wine amongst the beautiful flowers, while listening to music from the Monmouth Amphitheater in Main Street Park.

Recently awarded Travelers’ Choice 2022 by TripAdvisor, MaMare’s demonstrates a commitment to hospitality excellence thanks to their  excellent reviews! This puts them in the top 10% of hotels worldwide!

MaMere’s Guest House provides an unforgettable breakfast each morning. Taking advantage of Oregon’s Bountiful Central Valley, MaMere’s breakfast often include fresh fruits, baked treats, and savory home cooked meals. Offering everything from homemade waffles, and bacon to delicious quiche. Experience the delight, as you wake up to slow roasted coffee, and a specially prepared meal.

“Amazing historical house! This beautiful old home has charm & personality! Cannot add more stars to say it was one of the best B&B experiences we have had.” a Tripadvisor contributor.

Planning a 2021 Willamette Valley wedding? MaMere’s Guest House and Event Center is the perfect space for intimate wedding ceremonies, elopements, receptions, bridal showers, rehearsal dinners, bachelorette party weekends, and/or lodging for your guests!

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Oregon Bird Watching

Oregon Bird Watching in the Willamette Valley

There is an amazing wildlife show at these three Oregon wildlife refuges. Oregon Bird Watching is amazing. Especially this time of year when activity along the major flyways increase.

The Oregon Cascades Birding Trail (OCBT) is a great place to begin your birding adventure. From there you can decide where you’d like to visit. When you have made that decision turn to the website for the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild and I am sure you will find an inn close by.

The Willamette Valley is known for its unique Bed and Breakfasts, fertile land with orchards, vineyards and rolling grass fields.  Nestled between the snow-capped volcanic peaks of the Cascade Mountains and the forests of the Coast Range it’s no wonder the valley offers an abundance of birds and bird habitats and the Willamette Valley Birding Trail will take you there.

Willamette Valley National Wildlife Complex provides protection for historically abundant oak savanna, native prairie, riparian forest and wetland habitats. In these three protected places, endangered plant populations grow, summer songbirds nest, and wintering waterfowl find sanctuary in vast wetlands.

A hungry flock of Canada Geese soar high and then land to munch the grass across deep lush pastures at the Baskett Slough Wildlife Refuge near Dallas, Oregon. They arrive at Baskett Slough from far off arctic nesting grounds and have come to this U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge for the habitat.

Located near the confluence of the Willamette and Santiam Rivers, Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge. Established in 1965, the refuge provides wetlands and riparian woodland sanctuary for migratory and resident wildlife which range from the tiny Pacific chorus frog to the black-tailed deer.

Established in 1964, the William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge’s primary management goal is to provide wintering habitat for dusky Canada geese. Driving through the 5,325 acres of the refuge and the 341 acres of its Snag Boat Bend Unit, is like taking a step back into the natural history of the Willamette Valley.

The State of Oregon is a bird watcher’s paradise. There are extensive reserves and habitats that serve as excellent nesting and brood rearing areas for waterfowl and colonial nesting birds including American white pelican and several heron species. Many of our Member Inns have habitats on their grounds or are located near land ideal for birding. Grab your binoculars, choose an inn, and set out on your bird watching adventure.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

National Pi Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast shares their Crustless Apple Pie today, National Apple Pie Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast serves this Baked Apple as part of their three-course gourmet breakfast, typically with a more savory entrée because it is a bit sweet. Pairing the brown sugar and warm spices with a tart Granny Smith apple is the trick to achieving a good balance in the dish.

To make the filling just a bit more Oregonian, we use hazelnuts, but you could use walnuts if you can’t find hazelnuts. Fun fact: Oregon produces 99% of US hazelnuts, most of it in the Willamette Valley. You’ll see hazelnut orchards everywhere while you are out wine tasting.

Chehalem Ridge B&B serves the Baked Apple with vanilla yogurt, because, you know, breakfast. But if you choose to put some other vanilla dairy product on it (maybe something from the freezer?), you won’t be judged.  Enjoy safe at home, and start making plans to joins us for breakfast soon!

Crustless Apple Pie (aka Baked Apple)

Servings: 4

  • Yield: 4 apples
  • 4 small Granny Smith apples
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon clove, ground
  • 1/4 cup hazelnuts, chopped
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon butter, cut into 1/2″ cubes
  • 4 tablespoons vanilla yogurt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cut just a little off the bottom of each apple so that it sits upright and stable. Core each apple with apple corer or melon baller, leaving the bottom 1/4″ intact. Peel upper third of apple to prevent from splitting.

In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, spices, nuts and dried cranberries. Fill each apple equally with filling and pack it down into the cavity. Put in baking dish. Dot each apple with a small cube of butter. Bake until tender when pierced with a fork, about 30 to 35 minutes. Serve warm with yogurt over top.

You’re sure to enjoy sweet treats such as these at the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Willamette Stone

The Willamette Stone was a small stone obelisk originally installed by the Department of Interior in 1885

The Willamette Stone Heritage Site is located in the west hills of Portland, Oregon.  The surveys completed from this location promoted settlement of the Northwest and began the transfer of land from government ownership to private ownership.

The first marker, placed in 1851, a simple cedar stake, was replaced with a small stone obelisk in 1885.  In 1945 the property was purchased to preserve and protect the origin point of the land survey system for Oregon and Washington. A stainless-steel marker, set into the original obelisk, was rededicated in 1988.

The Willamette Meridian is one of 37 principal meridians in the United States.  All land surveys and property descriptions in the states of Oregon and Washington are referenced at this point. The Willamette meridian runs north-south, and the Willamette baseline runs east-west through the marker.

The Willamette Valley marks the end of the Oregon Trail and the history of that migration can be discovered at heritage sites, museums, and cemeteries across the region. Known for its premium wines, craft breweries, cideries, meaderies and distilleries the Willamette Valley is also home to unique, one-of-a-kind Bed and Breakfasts awaiting your visit.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Oregon State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Small Camas
Small Camas

‘Dating back for six to ten thousand years before the arrival of Euro-American settlers, Kalapuya Indians lived in the Willamette Valley and relied upon on the valley’s oak groves as source of acorns and other food resources such as camas. The practice of following seasonal rounds to gather food and plant materials led the native people to recurrent camp grounds, one of which is believed to be the oak grove at the State Fairgrounds in Salem.

‘When the State Fair was established in 1862, visitors came in wagons and camped in the oak grove continuing the tradition of historic use. Camping at the Fair became an annual event and evolved into a system with streets and designated campsites. The first automobile arrived in camp in the early 1900’s and in 1910 there is a record of ten cars being in the camp. By 1922, it is estimated that at least 2,000 autos were on the grounds.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 75′-90′
  • Age: 200 years
  • Circumference: 20″-38″
  • Quercus garryana

Visit these trees

The Fairgrounds Oak Grove is located at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem on the west side of 17th Street across from the Jackman-Long Building.

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple‘This Greenleaf Japanese Maple was planted by Governor Tom McCall in late 1973 or early 1974 during his second term of office. McCall is remembered for many environmental achievements, such as the “Beach Bill” which granted the state government the power to zone Oregon’s beaches, thus protecting them from private development, and the “Bottle Bill” which was the nation’s first mandatory bottle-deposit law, designed to decrease litter in Oregon.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 38′
  • Planted in: 1973
  • Circumference: 37″
  • Crown: 32′
  • Acer palmatum

Visit this tree

State Capital State Park, Salem

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

This black walnut, was planted by the Zimmerman family sometime around 1884. The Zimmerman’s were prominent members of the Aurora Colony, a religious community led by Dr. William Keil, that immigrated to this location from Bethel, Missouri. David Zimmerman was a carpenter and most likely planted the tree and others like it, for its valuable hardwood.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut
(Juglans nigra)

Location: Corner of Liberty @ 3rd Street, Aurora, OR
Circumference: 18 feet
Height: 70 feet (plus)
Crown Spread: 60 feet
Age: 130 years

Visit Oregon’s Pioneer Past – A 19th century Oregon Communal Society

The Aurora Colony members were known for their skill and craftsmanship and working together to complete community projects. Each were known for their special skill and shared it with their community. The colonists were descendants of old world craftsmen. Among the crafts they shared were furniture building, basket making, metal products and textiles including quilt making.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Moon Tree

Moon Tree is a young Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir, raised from a seed carried to the moon by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa in 1971.

I just love this story: Moon Tree – an Oregon Heritage Tree in the Oregon State Capital State Park

Moon Tree‘The story begins in 1953 when a man named Stuart Roosa, a native of Oklahoma, took a job as a US Forest Service smokejumper, a firefighter who would parachute into the wilderness to fight forest fires. Roosa came to love the forests of Oregon, a love that he would have the rest of his life. Later, Stuart Roosa became an Air Force test pilot and eventually returned to Oregon in the 1960s to train in the moon-scape like craters of Central Oregon.

‘He was destined to become an astronaut and was scheduled to fly on Apollo 14. In those days every Apollo astronaut was permitted to take a few small personal things into space with them. What they chose varied greatly. Alan Shepard chose golf balls, John Young on Gemini 3, took a corned beef sandwich. Stuart Roosa took tree seeds. This wasn’t just a publicity stunt; it was a science project too.  Scientists wanted to know what would happen to the seeds if they went to the Moon. Would they sprout when they came back? So when Apollo 14 launched in 1971, nearly 500 tree seeds of various species were tucked away in astronaut Roosa’s personal property kit. Roosa didn’t walk on the moon since he commanded the orbiting space module, but the tree seeds did orbit the moon 34 times.

‘Upon their return to earth, many seeds were propagated and the seedlings planted in celebration of America’s bicentennial. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others.

‘Unfortunately, adequate records were not maintained at the time, so we don’t know where all the moon trees were planted. Only about 50 of them are presently accounted for, including six planted in Oregon. I’m researching their locations.

Tree Facts

  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Approx. height: 63′
  • Age: 31 years
  • Circumference: 19″
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 2003

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Blue Atlas Cedar

The Blue Atlas Cedar in Carlton’s Ladd Park is over 100 years old.

Ladd Park was designed by Samuel Lancaster, architect of the Columbia River Highway and landscape architect. The Brooks Nursery donated plants and we can allow surmise that the Blue Atlas Cedar was part of the plant selection.

Blue Atlas CedarSarah Hall Ladd (1860-1927) was a renowned American landscape photographer of the Pacific NW. Her husband, Charles E. Ladd (1857-1920), was a businessman. The Ladd family businesses included the first bank in Portland, mills, railroads, ironworks, The Portland Hotel, and liquor. The Ladd District in Portland was an innovative master planned community and just a small part of the land the Ladd’s owned East and West of the Willamette.

In 1910 Sarah and her husband moved to Carlton. Sarah Ladd left $1500 in her estate to build a fountain in honor of her husband. And since the Ladd’s were important citizens of Carlton in the early 1900s, the most suitable location was found in the City Park which became Ladd Park.

Carlton, Oregon c1840

Carlton, Oregon, first settled by homesteaders in the 1840s, has a rich history of agriculture, logging, and, most recently, wine production.  Download the Walking Tour and explore the history of Carlton via a self-guided tour on your mobile device.

From R.R. Thompson House and The Carlton Inn explore dozens of small wineries, unique shops and wonderful restaurants in Carlton’s historic pioneer downtown. Lose oneself in the rich history of Oregon’s Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts. I’d be remiss if I did not mention Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast. About 7 miles from Carlton, the innkeeper suggested the Blue Atlas Cedar for our Majestic Oregon Trees series.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.