Tag Archives: oregon bed and breakfast guild

MaMere's Guest House

MaMere’s Guest House and Event Center in the Heart of Oregon’s Wine Country

MaMere’s Guest House is located in the heart of wine county, and is the perfect place to call home while you explore the surrounding wineries or visiting Western Oregon University.  The property is on the National Register of Historic Places and is only a block from WOU and Monmouth’s Main Street.

MaMere’s Guest House is charming, unique and colorful inside and out! Built in 1891 as a boarding house for female students, it has since housed hundreds and continues to do so today in its present form as a Bed and Breakfast Guest House.  From the Inn tour local vineyards, visit the coast, or just relax and enjoy a glass of wine amongst the beautiful flowers, while listening to music from the Monmouth Amphitheater in Main Street Park.

Recently awarded Travelers’ Choice 2022 by TripAdvisor, MaMare’s demonstrates a commitment to hospitality excellence thanks to their  excellent reviews! This puts them in the top 10% of hotels worldwide!

MaMere’s Guest House provides an unforgettable breakfast each morning. Taking advantage of Oregon’s Bountiful Central Valley, MaMere’s breakfast often include fresh fruits, baked treats, and savory home cooked meals. Offering everything from homemade waffles, and bacon to delicious quiche. Experience the delight, as you wake up to slow roasted coffee, and a specially prepared meal.

“Amazing historical house! This beautiful old home has charm & personality! Cannot add more stars to say it was one of the best B&B experiences we have had.” a Tripadvisor contributor.

Planning a 2021 Willamette Valley wedding? MaMere’s Guest House and Event Center is the perfect space for intimate wedding ceremonies, elopements, receptions, bridal showers, rehearsal dinners, bachelorette party weekends, and/or lodging for your guests!

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

National Pi Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast shares their Crustless Apple Pie today, National Apple Pie Day

Chehalem Ridge Bed and Breakfast serves this Baked Apple as part of their three-course gourmet breakfast, typically with a more savory entrée because it is a bit sweet. Pairing the brown sugar and warm spices with a tart Granny Smith apple is the trick to achieving a good balance in the dish.

To make the filling just a bit more Oregonian, we use hazelnuts, but you could use walnuts if you can’t find hazelnuts. Fun fact: Oregon produces 99% of US hazelnuts, most of it in the Willamette Valley. You’ll see hazelnut orchards everywhere while you are out wine tasting.

Chehalem Ridge B&B serves the Baked Apple with vanilla yogurt, because, you know, breakfast. But if you choose to put some other vanilla dairy product on it (maybe something from the freezer?), you won’t be judged.  Enjoy safe at home, and start making plans to joins us for breakfast soon!

Crustless Apple Pie (aka Baked Apple)

Servings: 4

  • Yield: 4 apples
  • 4 small Granny Smith apples
  • 3 tablespoons packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon clove, ground
  • 1/4 cup hazelnuts, chopped
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon butter, cut into 1/2″ cubes
  • 4 tablespoons vanilla yogurt

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cut just a little off the bottom of each apple so that it sits upright and stable. Core each apple with apple corer or melon baller, leaving the bottom 1/4″ intact. Peel upper third of apple to prevent from splitting.

In a small bowl, mix together the brown sugar, spices, nuts and dried cranberries. Fill each apple equally with filling and pack it down into the cavity. Put in baking dish. Dot each apple with a small cube of butter. Bake until tender when pierced with a fork, about 30 to 35 minutes. Serve warm with yogurt over top.

You’re sure to enjoy sweet treats such as these at the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

National Apple Pie Day is May 13

National Apple Pie Day doesn’t necessarily have to be celebrated with an apple pie, right.  Why not Apple Pie Cookies? The innkeeper at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast put a little spin on the classic apple pie and the results were amazing.

For quicker, easier assembly she used refrigerated pie crusts

Apple Pie Cookies

  • 6 green apples
  • 1 package refrigerated pie crust (2 crusts)
  • 5 ounces caramel sauce
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • Ground cinnamon

1) Preheat the oven to 350 Fahrenheit. Line a cookie sheet with parchment and non stick spray;  set aside.

2) Remove pie crusts from refrigerator so they warm up slightly. This will make them easier to work with.

3) Peel the skin off the green apples, compost.  Continue peeling so you have bunch of fleshy, white peels of apple in your bowl.

4) Dust work area with flour and slightly roll out crusts. From one pie crust, cut out circles for the cookies.  Cut the second pie crust into 1/2″ strips.

5) Place round pie crusts on cookie sheet. Spread a thin layer of caramel sauce on each cookie, followed by a pile of white apple peels. Using the 1/2” strips, create a tic-tac-toe lattice pattern over each cookie.

6) Beat egg in bowl and add sugar and nutmeg until well blended. Brush cookies with egg wash.

7) Sprinkle cookies with cinnamon.  Use more or less cinnamon depending on your preference.

8) Bake for 20 – 25 minutes, or until cookies are a golden brown. Remove from oven, allow to cool for 5 minutes, serve and enjoy!

The Old Parkdale Inn is located in the Upper Hood River Valley, a renowned growing region for pears and apples. Located in the quaint town of Parkdale, Oregon with Oregon’s tallest peak, Mt. Hood, as a backdrop. Outdoor adventure, farms, wineries and fine dining are nearby. The complete privacy of the inn and the serene gardens are perfect for romantic and restful getaways.

You’re sure to enjoy sweet treats such as these at the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Old Parkdale Inn

Old Parkdale Inn Offers lodging near Mt Hood and the Columbia River Gorge

Old Parkdale InnThe Old Parkdale Inn is located in the Upper Hood River Valley on the north slope of Oregon’s tallest peak, Mt. Hood, in the quaint town of Parkdale. Outdoor adventure, farms, wineries and fine dining are nearby. The complete privacy of the inn and the serene gardens are perfect for romantic and restful getaways.

All three Old Parkdale Inn well appointed, Oregon themed rooms have queen beds, private baths, a mini fridge, microwave, and coffee machine with a large selection of teas, coffee, and cocoa. The rooms are also equipped with a wall mounted smart TVs with satellite reception, hairdryer, alarm clock, fans, and heaters.

Driving an Electric Vehicle? Old Parkdale Inn has two EV chargers, one Tesla and one ClipperCreek offered as an amenity for their guests. They are also will be available to those passing through Parkdale along the Mt Hood and Columbia Gorge Electric Byway.

Recently awarded Travelers’ Choice 2022 by TripAdvisor, Old Parkdale Inn demonstrates a commitment to hospitality excellence thanks to their excellent reviews! This puts them in the top 10% of hotels worldwide!

The Old Parkdale Inn is equipped with FREE Wireless internet in the house. You’ll enjoy a hearty Northwest breakfast presenting and savoring Hood River delicacies in the Inn’s dining room.  As members of the Hood River Organics Community Supported Agriculture group a box of fresh, locally grown organic fruits and vegetables is delivered to the inn once a week. This produce, along with fresh herbs from the gardens and fruits and vegetables from the local farm stands and farmer’s markets, are used as ingredients in the breakfasts served every morning along with locally roasted organic coffee.

‘Everything you’d expect in a warm and cozy clean B&B. The room was wanting for nothing…very well stocked with attention to the smallest details.‘ a Tripadvisor contributor

For the outdoor enthusiast Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort, Timberline Ski Area, Cooper Spur Mountain Resort, the Columbia River Gorge are all just minutes away and outdoor adventures abound.

For the wine lover visit “A World of Wine in 40 miles” on the backroads of the Columbia Gorge wine growing region. And breweries!  Oregon has the most small artisan breweries per capita than any other state in the union! Solera Brewery is walking distance down the street.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

dog-friendly-hiking-trails

There are many dog friendly hiking trails to spectacular waterfalls in Oregon.

Listed below are the best dog friendly waterfall hikes in Oregon, arranged by region. Remember to grab a leash – dogs are allowed to use these trails but must be tethered.

When you go, plan to stay nearby with your dog at Old Parkdale Inn in Mt Hood; the motel at the Prospect Historic Hotel-Motel & Dinner House in Prospect; and C.H. Bailey House in Roseburg; as these are pet-friendly, top-rated, OBBG properties.

Oregon Dog Friendly Waterfalls to Hike to in Willamette Valley

dog friendly waterfall hikes oregon
  • Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls TrailAlsea Falls (W42) is the namesake and the first of two cascades on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail (W41). These two waterfalls are stunning, quick, and easy to reach with a 2.4-mile out-and-back trail. It’s a good year-round trail for all skill levels. Leashed dogs are welcome!
  • Sahalie Falls and Koosah Falls: Sahalie Falls (W46) is the first and tallest of three waterfalls on the roaring McKenzie River. It plunges about 100 feet over a naturally formed lava dam. Koosah Falls (W47), aka Middle Falls, is the second of the three major waterfalls of the McKenzie River, in the center of the Willamette National Forest. The waterfall plunges into a pool, south of Santiam Pass, a renowned 4,817-foot mountain pass in the Cascade Range. The waterfalls are part of a 2+ mile hike along a loop trail near Cascadia, Oregon, and features a beautiful lake.  It’s a good year-round trail for all skill levels. Visit with time to make the most of the McKenzie River National Recreation Trail and other wag-worthy activities. Leashed dogs are welcome!
  • Lower Kentucky Falls and Upper Kentucky Falls: Upper Kentucky Falls (W52): is the first of three spectacular waterfalls on the Kentucky Falls Trailhead, a 3.7-mile moderate out-and-bike hike. About 2-miles after Upper Kentucky Falls you’ll see an old growth forest and spectacular twin falls plunging 100 feet, they are: Lower Kentucky Falls (W51) and North Fork of the Smith Falls. The area is also popular with bird-watchers, so grab your binoculars and prepare for spectacular adventure. Leashed dogs are welcome!

Dog Friendly Hikes Oregon Coast:

dog friendly hikes oregon coast
  • Drift Creek Falls: A 240-foot suspension bridge (the longest in all of Oregon!) crosses the canyon beside the 8-ft falls at Drift Creek Falls (W34), making this waterfall an excursion unlike any other. This is a busy 3.2-mile out-and-back trail that’s open year-round near Lincoln City. Leashed dogs are welcome!
  • Hug Point Falls: Hug Point Falls (W3) sits at a beach and is surrounded by several caves. It’s a little over a mile on an out-and-back trail and open year-round. Great for all skill levels. Leashed dogs are welcome!
  • Secret Beach Falls: Shh… Secret Beach Falls (W65) is called a secret because it’s hard to find but here’s a tip: Tucked into the northern-most end where the Oregon Coast Trail squishes between the road and the overlook to Thunder Rock Cove, you’ll find a nearby trail that leads to a small beach with a waterfall. Roughly a mile-and-a-half, this moderate out-and-back trail is popular with bird watchers and best used between March and October. Leashed dogs are welcome!

Oregon Dog Friendly Waterfalls to Hike to in Southern Oregon:

  • Toketee Falls: Toketee Falls (W55) is one of the five waterfalls that make up the Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls. It’s about a half-mile out-and-back trail near Idleyld Park where picnic benches are plentiful. Leashed dogs are welcome! Stay nearby with your dog at C.H. Bailey House in Roseburg and Prospect Historic Hotel-Motel & Dinner House in Prospect.
  • Rogue River Gorge Falls: At the head you’ll find Rogue River Gorge Falls (W63) right where the river splits around volcanic rock. The view is stunning and made even better by the surrounding forest. The Rogue Gorge Trail is a 0.3-mile moderate loop that’s good for all skill levels. Leashed dogs are welcome at these dog friendly hikes in the Gorge! Stay nearby with your dog at the motel of the Prospect Historic Hotel-Motel & Dinner House in Prospect.
  • Pearsony Falls: Pearsony Falls (W64) is one of four falls that make up Prospect Waterfalls, which also include Barr Creek Falls, Prospect Falls, and Mill Creek Falls. This series of cascades follow the Rogue River just outside the town of Prospect. The river drops and ricochets until it hits a stretch of boulders. There is a 1.2-mile out-and-back trail that’s good for all skill levels. The trail is best trekked between April and September. Leashed dogs are welcome! Stay nearby with your dog at C.H. Bailey House in Roseburg and the motel of the Prospect Historic Hotel-Motel & Dinner House

Oregon Dog Friendly Waterfalls to Hike to in Central and Eastern Oregon:

  • Benham Falls: Benham Falls (W58) are the largest falls on the upper Deschutes River. Unlike the other falls the area, Benham Falls is not related to a lava flow. It is a free-form cascade in its own right and you’ll come to it along the Benham Falls Trail. It’s a 1.5-mile out-and-back trail near Bend that’s open year-round and good for dog friendly backpacking Oregon for all skill levels. Leashed dogs are welcome!
  • BC Creek Falls: Located near Wallowa State Park, the BC Creek Falls (W26) lies within the Chief Joseph Mountain Trail, approximately an 8-mile out-and-back trail near Joseph. In less than 3-miles on the trail you’ll find two rivers and Wallowa Lake views, in addition to the falls. Leashed dogs are welcome!

Oregon Dog Friendly Waterfalls to Hike to in Mt Hood and The Gorge:

  • Tamanawas Falls: Bring your binoculars and prepare to see a lot of birds on your way to Tamanawas Falls (W18)! The falls are AMAZING at 100 feet high and 40 feet wide. The trailhead footbridge is the midpoint of a 8-mile stretch of the East Fork of the Hood River hosting nesting Harlequin Ducks. The moderate 3.4-mile out-and-backed trail is best used between May and October. Leashed dogs are welcome! Stay nearby with your dog at Old Parkdale Inn.
  • Hole-in-the-Wall Falls: This waterfall is an anomaly in that it’s a manmade waterfall! Highway crews created tunnel through the rock to divert Warren Creek here in the 2930s and solve an issue with the creek and the highway. The water shoots out from a long tunnel and, well, falls. The falls are on a 0.2-mile out-and-back trail near Hood River. Start your hike at Starvation Creek Falls and walk west on the Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail, you’ll pass Cabin Creek Falls, Hole-in-the-Wall Falls, and Lancaster Falls  to reach a jaw-dropping view of the Gorge. Leashed dogs are welcome! Stay nearby with your dog at Old Parkdale Inn.
  • Ramona Falls: Ramona Falls (W17) is a shaded waterfall is in a forest along the Pacific Crest Trail on the upper Sandy River — on the west side of Mount Hood. The falls are about 120-feet tall, consisting of a wall of cascades. You’ll see them on a moderate 7-mile loop trail that’s best used between May and October. Leashed dogs are welcome! Stay nearby with your dog at Old Parkdale Inn.

The Oregon trail of Waterfalls represents countless hours, many sketches, and endless conversations to help make your next Oregon road trip one to remember. We look forward to seeing you soon.

SEE A DIGITAL VERSION OF THE MAP

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

turtlejanes bed and breakfast

turtlejanes bed and breakfast

turtlejanesturtlejanes bed and breakfast is a delightful small inn on the Oregon Coast in Oceanside, nine miles west of Tillamook, home of world-famous Tillamook Cheese.

The inn’s two bedrooms are beautifully appointed with spectacular views, king-size beds, private bathrooms with heated floors, and blackout shades on the windows. You’re invited to help yourself to coffee, tea, hot chocolate, microwave popcorn and Tillamook ice cream, available to guests around the clock.

‘Think of all the best superlatives and apply them to turtlejanes. Comfy, welcoming, and delicious‘ a TripAdvisor contributor

Oceanside is a cozy little hideaway located just off the Three Capes Scenic Drive. The beach is uncrowded and  a tunnel through the hill leads to another beach famous for agate collecting. There are amazing hiking trails at Cape Lookout and Cape Meares with lighthouse and access to the unusual Octopus tree. Birders love the area and it is not unusual to see para gliders coming down from the top of Maxwell Mountain.

‘Think of all the best superlatives and apply them to Turtlejanes. Comfy, welcoming, delicious. The view is spectacular.’ a TripAdvisor Contributor

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Spring Showers Don’t Just Bring May Flowers in Oregon

Come feel the mist of Oregon waterfalls on your face!

Spring showers don’t just bring May flowers in Oregon. They, along snow pack melt, supply Oregon scenic rivers the water needed to create our wildly beautiful and renowned waterfalls.

And it’s certainly not too early to start planning your Oregon Bed and Breakfast vacation that should involve chasing waterfalls.

Oregon has more than 238 waterfalls across the state (and 1,000+ according to the Northwest Waterfalls Survey). We’ve come up with a list of 66 must-see waterfalls (it’s really more like 80 since we grouped some together).

GET A DIGITAL COPY OF THE
OREGON TRAIL OF WATERFALLS MAP

Here’s our list of must-see Oregon waterfalls by region. Beside each waterfall you’ll see a number. That’s the number we’ve assigned to the waterfall on The Oregon Trail of Waterfalls map.

OREGON CASCADE WATERFALLS
Ramona Falls (W17): This shaded waterfall is in a forest along the Pacific Crest Trail on the upper Sandy River — on the west side of Mount Hood. The falls are about 120 feet tall, consisting of a wall of cascades.

oregon cascade waterfalls

Tamanawas Falls (W18): Bring your binoculars and prepare to see a lot of birds and a stunning waterfall! The falls are AMAZING at 100 feet high and 40 feet wide. The trailhead footbridge is the midpoint of a 8-mile stretch of the East Fork of the Hood River hosting nesting Harlequin Ducks. Belted Kingfisher are common but it’s the songbirds you’re likely to remember long after they’ve sung their tunes.

Little Zig Zag River Falls (W19): One of Oregon’s hidden gems. A picturesque stream leads to a photogenic waterfall on this family-friendly trail; complete with a picnic table at the very start. It couldn’t be more perfect.

Yocum Falls (W20): This waterfall is right in the heart of the Mount Hood National Forest. It sits in Zigzag canyon with many waterfalls, including Little Zigzag River Falls and Ramona Falls.

Pencil Falls (W21): This glacier-fed waterfall is in the alpine area of Mount Hood Meadows. A small path leads to a great viewing.

Upper Heather Canyon Falls (W22): Where the Timberline Trail crosses Heather Creek, is thought to be one of the most scenic areas of Mount Hood. In Heather Canyon a series of waterfalls tumbles beneath this trail.

Umbrella Falls (W23): This popular and family-friendly waterfall is accessible from scenic hiking trails.

White River Falls (W33): The waterfall is the main focus of the White River Falls State Park and for good reason — the scenic White River plunges 90-feet from a basalt shelf.

Tamolitch Falls (W45): Follow the McKenzie river through the old growth forest to Tamolitch Falls, which flows into a lava formed Blue Pool, renowned for its iridescent blue coloring.

cascade waterfalls oregon

Sahalie Falls (W46): Sahalie Falls, is the first and tallest of three waterfalls on the roaring McKenzie River. It plunges about 100 feet over a naturally formed lava dam.

Koosah Falls (W47): Koosah Falls, aka Middle Falls, is the second of the three major waterfalls of the McKenzie River, in the center of the Willamette National Forest. The waterfall plunges into a pool, south of Santiam Pass, a renowned 4,817-foot mountain pass in the Cascade Range.

CENTRAL AND EASTERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Hurricane Creek Falls (W24): Hurricane Creek Falls are located along granite and limestone cliffs and an incredible amount of wildflowers along the Hurricane Creek Trailhead at Wallowa-Whitman National Forest.

Falls Creek Falls (W25): This is one of the prettiest waterfalls in the Pacific Northwest!

BC Creek Falls (W26): Located near Wallowa State Park, BC Creek Falls (W26) lies within the Chief Joseph Mountain Trail, approximately an 8-mile out-and-back trail near Joseph. In less than 3-miles on the trail you’ll find two rivers and Wallowa Lake views, in addition to the falls.

Wallowa Falls (W27): Take Chief Joseph Trail to Wallowa Falls (and BC Falls – just a few miles away). Wallowa falls seems more like a long rapid but its location, nested in a deep gorge is beautiful.

John Day River (W37): This is the longest un-dammed river in Oregon. The section between Service Creek and Tumwater Falls flows through a colorful canyons and beautiful terrain.

Steelhead Falls (W48): Formed a few million years ago, this Oregon waterfall is lined by colorful 25-foot cliffs. The fall drops into a deep canyon.

Tumalo Falls (W53): Tumalo Falls is both the tallest, 89 feet, and most impressive waterfall along Tumalo Creek – as well as one of the most popular outdoor destinations in the vicinity of Bend.

Benham Falls (W58): These are the largest falls on the upper Deschutes River. Unlike the other falls the area, Benham Falls is not related to a lava flow. It is a free-form cascade in its own right.

Fall River Falls (W59): A trail passes by historic cabin ruins and parallels the Fall River all the way to the falls.

McKay Crossing Falls (W60): This 23-foot waterfall plunges into a small canyon with several picture-ready viewpoints.

Paulina Creek Falls (W61): This waterfall is known for its side-by-side drop of 80-feet that surrounds a small island at the edge of the cliff.

oregon waterfalls

COLUMBIA GORGE WATERFALLS
Bridal Veil (W8): Hidden beneath the Historic Columbia River Highway, this small two-tiered waterfall is easy to reach. Make sure to check out the romantic messages carved into the handrails of the viewpoint.

Wiesendanger Falls (W9): Named after Forest Service Ranger, Albert Wiesendanger, the 55-foot falls is on Multnomah Creek

Ponytail Falls (W10): Ponytail Falls, also known as Upper Horsetail Falls, is on Horsetail Creek just above Horsetail Falls. This is one of the more popular waterfalls for professional photographers, for stunning pictures looking out from behind the falls. See a ‘behind’ shot.

Elowah Falls (W11): Elowah Falls drops 289 feet into an amphitheater of lava flows of millions of years ago.

Wahclella Falls (W12): OregonHikers.org describes this fall as one of the more interesting falls in the Columbia River Gorge. It runs along Tanner Creek and features two drops.

Historic Columbia River Highway waterfalls — including Multnomah Falls, Horsetail Falls, Latourell Falls, and Wahkeena Falls; W14): You can tour the waterfalls that make up the Columbia River Gorge by car or on foot, but you won’t have the full-on spectacular experience unless you do both. Whatever you do, make sure to save time to see Multnomah Falls. It is the most visited natural recreation site in the Pacific Northwest and more than 2 million visitors come each year to take in its view.

historic columbia river highway waterfalls

Ecola Falls (W15): Ecola Falls is the last major of the falls as you travel upstream on the Larch Mountain Trail. What does ecola mean? It’s the Chinook word for whale.

OREGON COAST RANGE
Bridge Creek Falls (W5): This three tier fall has a 35-ft drop and is right near Highway 6 by the Footbridge Trailhead.

Fern Rock Falls (W6): An understated and beautiful waterfall along Highway 6.

University Falls (W7): Located within an area that was devastated by one of the worst forest fires in Oregon’s history, this forest was rehabilitated, trees were planted (more than 70 million!) and the Tillamook State Forest began. University Falls is a 55-ft fall over a wall of basalt.

Green Peak Falls (W41): This is the second waterfall on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. First, you’ll see Alsea Falls. While most people tend to stop there, there’s a second waterfall, just as beautiful but larger, father ahead. Keep going, you’ll likely find a magical moment of solace and beauty.

Alsea Falls (W42): This is the namesake and the first of two cascades on the Alsea Falls and Green Peak Falls Trail. It’s stunning, quick, and easy to reach.

oregon coast waterfalls

Sweet Creek Falls (W49): Four tiered-plunges from varying heights cascade for about 70-feet, making an impressive multi-waterfall effect. Bring your camera!

Beaver Creek Falls (W50): Beaver Creek is a small waterfall where Beaver Creek and Sweet Creek meet and intertwine into one.

Lower Kentucky Falls (W51): The Kentucky Falls Trailhead has three falls. First comes Upper Kentucky Falls, then 2-miles later through an old growth forest you’ll see spectacular twin falls plunging 100 feet, they are: Lower Kentucky Falls and North Fork of the Smith Falls.

Upper Kentucky Falls (W52): The Upper Kentucky Falls is the first of three spectacular waterfalls on the Kentucky Falls Trailhead.

SOUTHERN OREGON WATERFALLS
Umpqua River Highway Waterfalls (Susan Creek Falls, Fall Creek Falls, Watson Falls, Toketee Falls, Clearwater Falls; W55): 

Diamond Creek Falls (W56): There’s a reason Diamond Creek Falls and its graceful cliffside drop is thought of as one of the prettiest waterfalls in Oregon.

Salt Creek Falls (W57): This is a popular stop for travelers on Highway-58. It’s also the second highest waterfall in Oregon.

Rogue River Gorge Falls (W63): At the head of the gorge you’ll find this waterfall, right where the river splits around volcanic rock. The view is stunning and made even better by the surrounding forest.

Prospect Waterfalls (Pearsony Falls, Barr Creek Falls, Prospect Falls, Mill Creek Falls; W64): This series of cascades follow the Rogue River just outside the town of Prospect. The river drops and ricochets until it hits a stretch of boulders.

southern oregon waterfalls

Klamath Falls (W66): Define waterfall? That’s what you might think when you see the falls of Klamath Falls. They’re more of a set of whitewater rapids. And yet, they’re beautiful and worth the short trek.

OREGON COAST WATERFALLS
Youngs River Falls (W1): Grab your bathing suit! This 50-foot waterfall is a popular swimming spot during the summer months.

Hug Point Falls (W3): This waterfall sits at a beach and is surrounded by several caves. Visit at low tide and be sure to get back to the trail head before the tide turns.

Blumenthal Falls (W4): This is one of the few waterfalls in the Northwest that you can see fall into the Pacific Ocean without needing any help from a boat, thank you.

Munson Creek Falls (W28): Whoa! This is the tallest waterfall in the Coast Range — tumbling 319 feet over several tiers. A small trail winds along the Munson Creek through an old-growth forest to find the base of the fall.

munson creek falls

Upton Falls (W29): Something fishy? Well, maybe fish-related at least. This fall was the upstream limit of migration for native fish but the falls have been altered to include a fish ladder and a dam to divert the water too.

Drift Creek Falls (W34): The 240-foot suspension bridge (the longest in all of Oregon!) crosses the canyon beside the 8-ft falls, making this waterfall excursion unlike any other.

Rocky Creek Falls (W38): Pull off Highway 101 and you’re likely to see these easy-to-reach and easy-to-spot falls. They spill right into the Pacific Ocean.

Golden Falls (W54): Did you know that if you hike a little over a mile to the top of Golden Falls you can see a bird’s-eye view of the waterfall, firs, and cedars. Golden Falls is the third tallest waterfall in the Oregon Coast Range and share the state natural area with Silver Falls

Elk Creek Falls (W62): It may be last but it’s not least. Elk Creek Falls is the final of about a dozen significant waterfalls situated within the Elk Creek basin.

Secret Beach Falls (W65): Shh… it’s called a secret because it’s hard to find but here’s the skinny. Tucked into the northern-most end where the Oregon Coast Trail squishes between the road and the overlook to Thunder Rock Cove, you’ll find a nearby trail that leads to a small beach with a waterfall.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY WATERFALLS
Beaver Falls (W2): Beaver Falls spills from a lip of basalt into a turquoise-colored pool. Some say that if you come at the right time, you’ll see rainbows in the mist. Beaver Falls is one you can spot from the road if you’d rather not walk the trail.

Willamette Falls (W16): This horseshoe-shaped block waterfall is created by a basalt shelf in the river bottom. It’s fall is 42 ft high and 1,500-ft -wide and set the record for being the largest waterfall by water volume in the Northwest and also for being the 18th largest by volume. Surrounding the falls are the locks, which are the oldest continuously operating multi-lift lock and canal system in all of the United States.

willamette falls

INSIDER TIP! Take a jet boat ride up the Willamette River to the base of the falls.

Niagara Falls (W30) and Pheasant Creek Falls (W31): Follow the foliage then cross not one wooden bridge but FOUR — each with a magnificent view of two 100-ft waterfalls: Niagara Falls and Pheasant Creek Falls.

Scotts Mills Falls (W32): Scotts Mills Falls is a small fall with big popularity. It sits at the site of a former flour mill and cascades through a rocky cliff into the large swimming hole.

Falls City Falls (W35): Falls City Falls are at the center of Falls City. In fact, Falls City is named after the falls. In the past, this was a lumbermill town.

Trail of Ten Falls at Silver Falls State Park (W36): This is Oregon’s largest State Park, coming in at 9,000-acres. It also has one of the most impressive waterfall day-hikes in the United States! Well, there are at least 10 spectacular falls within this 7.8 mile-loop.

Parker Creek Falls (W39): To see Parker Falls you’ll need to work your way through the Parker Falls Trail. The rewards are huge! You’ll see a series of waterfalls, pools and cascades nestled in a forest of Douglas fir.

Parker Creek Falls (W39) and Alder Creek Falls (W40) are roadside on the way up to Mary’s Peak, the highest in Oregon’s Coast Range at 4,097 feet.

Royal Terrace Falls (W43): Royal Terrace Falls is the biggest of the four falls at McDowell Creek Falls Park though it’s also the lowest-volume. A sign nailed to a nearby tree says the falls drop 119 feet.

Majestic Falls (W44): This 39-ft waterfall is arguably the most beautiful of McDowell Creek Park. There are staircases with nearly 70 steps that let you explore the cascading waterfall from different vantage points.

willamette valley waterfalls

GET A DIGITAL COPY OF THE
OREGON TRAIL OF WATERFALLS MAP

The front of the map features more than 80 must-see waterfalls across the entire state, as well as nearby bed and breakfasts.
The back on the map highlights various bits of information, like:
Scenic drives in Oregon
Scenic bikeways of Oregon
Portland Food Cart Pods
Native American Food
Food Trails of Oregon
Oregon Waterfalls
Wineries Across Oregon
Oregon Movie Locations
The Oregon Trail History
The Oregon Trail Game
Print an Oregon Bucket List

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

 

Geocaching in Oregon

Geocaching in Oregon ~ Where it all Began

Geocaching in Oregon is nothing new as the game started here. On May 3rd this game, once known as the “Great American GPS Stash Hunt’, celebrates its 22nd birthday with more than 3 million hides in over 190 countries. A little history lesson here, the full version can be read on the Geocaching.com website where I pulled this information.

“Geocaching is a high-tech treasure hunting game played throughout the world by adventure seekers equipped with GPS devices. The basic idea is to locate hidden containers, called geocaches, outdoors and then share your experiences online. Geocaching is enjoyed by people …from all age groups, with a strong sense of community and support for the environment. Geocaching.com is the headquarters for the activity”

On May 3rd 2000 a black bucket was placed in the woods near Beavercreek, Oregon, south of Portland. Along with a logbook and pencil, various items including videos, books, software, and a slingshot were left to trade. The waypoint of this “stash” were shared online and the “Great America Stash Hunt” was started

That original bucket was severely damaged by an Oregon road crew mower and is no longer around. Concerned geocachers dedicated the Original Stash Tribute Plaque GCGV0P on behalf of cachers everywhere.

Many innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are avid cachers and you’re sure to find many caches near their inn when doing a search.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple‘This Greenleaf Japanese Maple was planted by Governor Tom McCall in late 1973 or early 1974 during his second term of office. McCall is remembered for many environmental achievements, such as the “Beach Bill” which granted the state government the power to zone Oregon’s beaches, thus protecting them from private development, and the “Bottle Bill” which was the nation’s first mandatory bottle-deposit law, designed to decrease litter in Oregon.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 38′
  • Planted in: 1973
  • Circumference: 37″
  • Crown: 32′
  • Acer palmatum

Visit this tree

State Capital State Park, Salem

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

This black walnut, was planted by the Zimmerman family sometime around 1884. The Zimmerman’s were prominent members of the Aurora Colony, a religious community led by Dr. William Keil, that immigrated to this location from Bethel, Missouri. David Zimmerman was a carpenter and most likely planted the tree and others like it, for its valuable hardwood.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut
(Juglans nigra)

Location: Corner of Liberty @ 3rd Street, Aurora, OR
Circumference: 18 feet
Height: 70 feet (plus)
Crown Spread: 60 feet
Age: 130 years

Visit Oregon’s Pioneer Past – A 19th century Oregon Communal Society

The Aurora Colony members were known for their skill and craftsmanship and working together to complete community projects. Each were known for their special skill and shared it with their community. The colonists were descendants of old world craftsmen. Among the crafts they shared were furniture building, basket making, metal products and textiles including quilt making.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.