Tag Archives: heritage trees

Willamette Mission Cottonwood

Willamette Mission Cottonwood – Populus trichocarpa

Willamette Mission Cottonwood‘This giant black cottonwood stands near the site of the Willamette Mission established by Reverend Jason Lee in 1834. At that time, the Mission and tree were located on the banks of the Willamette River. The great flood of 1861 changed the river course to its present channel, leaving what is now Mission Lake.

 

Willamette Mission CottonwoodThe Willamette Mission Cottonwood is the largest of its kind in Oregon and the nation.

Willamette Mission State Park is a gorgeous retreat for birdwatchers, horseback riders, disc golfers and kayakers. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the park marks the site of the original Willamette Mission, established in 1834 and washed away by flood in 1861. Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

  • Owens Cherry – Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853.
  • Champoeg State Heritage Area – where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place
  • Hoover-Minthorn Historic House – childhood home of Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States
  • Ewing Young Oak – ‘Ewing Young, fur trapper and trader in the Southwest and Mexico, turned settler in the Chehalem Valley in 1834.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they probably are.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak, numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family, and a large incense cedar that sheltered the family’s cattle at night and during foul weather. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Ellmaker Oak:
Age: 300+
Circumference: 178.4”
Height: 76
Crown spread: 97’

This magnificent grove of trees is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Hoover-Minthorn Pear 🍐 Pyrus communis

Called a Winter Pear this tree was planted in 1879 by Jesse Edwards, the Quaker founder of Newberg, Oregon. This property was sold in 1884 to Dr. Henry John Minthorn, uncle and foster father of Herbert Hoover. It’s scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

‘When the 11 year old Hoover arrived here from Iowa in 1885 to live with his uncle John Minthorn and family, he joined in the task of making pear butter and was told that he could eat as many pears as he liked. His experience with pears is best expressed by his own words, “I liked them, but after two days of almost exclusive pear diet, I did not eat pears again for years.” Herbert Hoover went on to become the 31st President of the United States.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 30′
  • Planted in: 1879
  • Circumference: 4′ 7″
  • Dedicated on: August 10, 2005
  • Crown: 27′ – 28′

The Hoover Minthorn Pear and Hoover-Minthorn Historic House are a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Heritage Tree

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Owen Cherry – 174 years in Eugene Oregon

Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853. By 1950 the site of the tree was owned by George Owen, a former Eugene City Councilor, lumberman, and philanthropist. Mr. Owen donated the site to the city. The Owen Rose Garden has more than 4,500 roses of over 400 varieties.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 49′
  • Planted in: 1860’s (possibly 1847)
  • Circumference: 18″ 3″
  • Dedicated on: April 6, 1999
  • Crown: 80′

The featured photo of the Owen Cherry tree in full bloom was taken April 8, 2021. It’s beautiful year round, as is the Rose Garden, but to see it in all it’s glory plan your trip now. This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Magnificent Oregon Trees recognized in April leading up to Arbor Day 2022

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

What’s so Special About Oregon White Oaks?

The Oregon White Oak is an attractive deciduous hardwood tree native to Oregon, found as far north as British Columbia and as far south as southern California. These lovely hardwoods seem able to withstand both lengthy flooding and drought, and are most common on sites that are either too exposed or too dry for other tree species.

Mature oaks provided an abundance of food for the Kalapuya Indians, who used the tree’s acorns to make acorn meal. It’s now estimated that more than 99 percent of pre-settlement prairies and savannas in Oregon have been converted to urban areas, farms, and other developments. Oregon White Oaks provide favorable habitat to a number of important wildlife types, including the western gray squirrel, which is listed as threatened in Washington and sensitive in Oregon, and to many birds, including dark-eyed juncos, goldfinches, nuthatches, wild turkeys, and acorn and pileated woodpeckers.

Willamette Valley Oaks: Yesterday and Today

The majestic oak is an iconic symbol of the Willamette Valley with a long-standing cultural significance and valuable ecological function. The Rivers to Ridges Partnership recognizes that our remaining oak habitats and the species that depend upon them rely on the active management of both public and private lands. Learn about their common management actions being implemented in Oregon Oak habitats.

Oregon White Oak in Winter

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

In April leading up to Arbor Day 2022 We’ll celebrate Oregon’s magnificent trees the month of April

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Yamhill Vineyards Oregon White Oaks

The Oregon White Oaks growing alongside the vineyards at Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast are thought to be at least 60 years old, possibly older. Yamhill Vineyards Bed & Breakfast is a charming 2 bedroom B&B in the heart of Willamette Valley Wine Country, a secluded location among 18 acres of vineyards overlooking the Willamette Valley just outside of Carlton, Oregon.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Heritage Tree

Celebrate Oregon’s Magnificent Trees –

Magnificent Oregon Trees recognized in April leading up to Arbor Day 2022

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Heritage Tree

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

Oregon Heritage Trees recognized in April leading up to Arbor Day 2022

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Share your entry with us at info@obbg.org

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Owen Cherry – 174 years in Eugene Oregon

Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853. By 1950 the site of the tree was owned by George Owen, a former Eugene City Councilor, lumberman, and philanthropist. Mr. Owen donated the site to the city. The Owen Rose Garden has more than 4,500 roses of over 400 varieties. The magnificent Owen Cherry was in spectacular spring bloom when we visited this past week.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak and numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Oregon Heritage Tree

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

We spent the last couple of days exploring around Eugene, Oregon: chasing waterfalls, geocaches, covered bridges and Oregon Heritage Trees. We are aware of the need to travel to destinations that make it easy to maintain social distancing practices. Here in Oregon we’ve got your social distance travel needs covered.

Owen Cherry – 174 years in Eugene Oregon

Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853. By 1950 the site of the tree was owned by George Owen, a former Eugene City Councilor, lumberman, and philanthropist. Mr. Owen donated the site to the city. The Owen Rose Garden has more than 4,500 roses of over 400 varieties. The magnificent Owen Cherry was in spectacular spring bloom when we visited this past week.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak and numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: With guidance from the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon will again require masks in all indoor public spaces, that includes the inns of the Oregon B&B Guild. This measure is intended to slow the spread of the COVID-19 delta variant and went into effect Friday, Aug. 13. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.