Tag Archives: oregon history

Guest blogger: Roselyn, innkeeper
R.R. Thompson House in Carlton Oregon

This Christmas, Pittock Mansion takes a look back at the hobbies and pastimes of the legendary family in its annual holiday extravaganza.

From knitting to hiking, beekeeping to music, the decorations highlight familiar and not-so-familiar hobbies enjoyed by Henry and Georgiana Pittock, their children and grandchildren who resided in the opulent mansion 100 years ago.

Volunteers have decorated each of the rooms in the 16,000 sq. ft. mansion into a holiday showcase. Each room displays items related to one or two hobbies, such as skiing, opera, tea parties or card games.

The displays are on view through December 31 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed Christmas Day).  Built in 1914, the mansion “tells the story of Portland’s transformation from pioneertown to modern, industrialized city through the history and legacy of one of its most influential families, the Pittocks.” (http://pittockmansion.org)

The decorated mansion is a holiday treat for locals and tourists alike. Adding to the ambiance are musical recitals in the music/living room with stunning views of the Portland skyline.

The R. R. Thompson House will be glad to host your visit to the Willamette Valley of Oregon. We are located in the ‘Great Little Town of Carlton,’ and just an hour’s drive to Pittock Mansion.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Oregon Trail

The Historic Oregon Trail turns 175 in 2018.  Time for you to hit the highway, inspire your own pioneer spirit, stand in the actual wagon ruts pioneers left behind, and visit the numerous interpretive sites, monuments and cultural centers along the way.

The Oregon Trail traversed 2,170 miles of what today is Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Idaho and Oregon.  Travel the Oregon National Historic Trail through Oregon, from Idaho, along the Columbia River and around Mt Hood.

There are several trail sights from the Idaho border to Baker City, the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails.  From the top of Flagstaff Hill you can still see the trail running out across the plains.  Lodging in Baker City, Oregon: Baker City Blue Door

The cemeteries along the route reveal so many Oregon Trail stories: where the emigrants came from, how they lived, and died, as they headed for Oregon and the awaited promises.

The last hurdle for emigrants on the Oregon Trail was the Cascade Range. Early pioneers either had to barge down the treacherous Columbia River, make their home in The Dalles, or travel the Barlow Road through the Cascades along the south side of Mt Hood.  Lodging option on Mt Hood: Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast 

The Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum reveals the cataclysmic floods that helped shape the Columbia River Gorge. Here also you’ll experience interactive exhibits of the Lewis and Clark expedition, The Oregon Trail and 10,000 years of Native American life in the Gorge.  Lodging: Hood River Bed and Breakfasts

At the End of the Oregon Trail Interpretive Center and Historic Site in Oregon City, visitors can learn about the journey, discover what it was like to be a pioneer and what life was like for those who reached Oregon Territory.  Lodging options: Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts

“On such a journey as this, there is much to interest and amuse one who is fond of picturesque scenery, and of wild life.” – Randolph Marcy, 1859

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hood River Valley

October is National Apple Month

October is recognized as National Apple Month and Oregon is among the leaders in fine apple production.  Apples are a member of the rose family of plants and the blossoms are much like wild-rose blossoms.  Oregon produces over 21 commercial apple varieties, with Fuji and Gala leading the state’s production but we know of one orchard, Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley that grow over 90 different varieties! The state’s rainfall and mild climate make it a prime location for apple orchards. The most orchards can be found in Oregon’s northwestern region near and around Portland.  In 2015 Oregon produced an estimated 110 million pounds of apples.

History of the Apple – Oregon Growers

In 1847, Henderson Luelling brought more than 700 one year old grafted fruit trees from Iowa to Oregon by ox-team along with his wife and 8 children.  Today, in front of a military building in the city of Vancouver, WA, an historic apple tree with a plaque on it records the following story: ‘In 1847, Henderson Lewelling, know for promoting the fruit industry in Iowa, Oregon, and California, came to Oregon in a covered wagon with his wife, children and 350 fruit trees that had survived the long journey.’  It goes on to say ‘By 1850, their first crop produced 100 apples. It was the time of the Gold Rush in California, and when they rushed to San Francisco with the apple crop, prospectors were so hungry for fresh fruit that he sold them for $5 each. They used the money to build more orchards.’

Today, the Hood River Valley is one of the major growers of apples.  Kiyokawa Family Orchards in the Hood River Valley have been growing the finest produce available since 1911. The fertile soils found at the base of Mt. Hood and rarified, glacier-fed water sources create a unique growing environment.  The Kiyokawa’s take pride in promoting local and sustainably grown produce and utilize a farm management system that incorporates best management practices.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Central and Eastern Oregon Museums

Central and Eastern Oregon Museums Worth making the trip

The Central and Eastern Oregon museums will take you back in time. A glimpse into an ever changing Oregon, it’s indigenous people, hearty immigrants, and hard working cattlemen.

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute where the history, culture and hospitality of the people who have lived on this land for more than 10,000 years comes alive.  More than just a museum, Tamastslikt celebrates the traditions of Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes.

High Desert Museum, in Bend, Oregon, is nationally acclaimed and is dedicated to broadening the understanding of the High Desert’s wildlife, culture, art and natural resources.

At daily shows and demonstrations, wildlife experts will help you learn about the Museum’s more than 100 wildlife creatures — from porcupines, golden eagles and owls, to bats, lizards, snakes and spiders.   In the Birds of Prey Center you will have a rare opportunity to get a close-up look at some of nature’s fiercest predators – owls, hawks and eagles.

Kam Wah Chung State Heritage Site in John Day, Oregon, is a must-see for anyone with an interest in Oregon history. This structure was built as a trading post on The Dalles Military Road in the mid-1800’s. Chinese businessman Lung On and herbal doctor Ing Hay worked out of this building. Dr. Hay administered care to the Chinese gold-mine workers, pioneers, and others from the John Day area and beyond by using traditional Chinese remedies. Built to preserve the legacy of the Chinese workforce in Oregon, the museum contains artifacts and displays that share some of the trials of everyday life of these people.

They walked for 2,000 miles…men, women, and children by the tens of thousands. The story of this journey comes alive today through the life-size exhibits at the National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center, Baker City.  The museum offers living history demonstrations, interpretive programs, exhibits, multi-media presentations, special events, and more than four miles of interpretive trails. Let the innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild share their knowledge of these unique museums and many other natural attractions in the beautiful and vast expanse of Eastern Oregon.

These are but a few of the many historical museum located in Central and Eastern Oregon.  Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway

Traversing between Hood River and Mosier, the five mile section of the Historic Columbia River Highway passes through the Twin Tunnels and two climate zones.  Being closed to auto traffic is an amazing trail for hikers, bikers, rollerbladers, anyone human powered.  Starting at the east Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead near Mosier, the trail leads through semi-arid terrain dotted with ponderosa pine for about a mile until you reach the Twin Tunnels.  There is an Earthcache nearby, Missoula Ice Age Floods at Mosier Syncline Flanks GC4T299, which shares information about nearby spectacular geologic formations that tell the story of the gorge’s creation.

After passing through the tunnels, you’ll emerge into a forest of fir trees and other common western Oregon plants and stunning views of the Columbia River Gorge.  Viewpoints along the 3.5 mile segment from the tunnels to the west Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead overlook the river.  Consider a stay at Three Sleeps Vineyards Bed and Breakfast in Mosier when exploring the Historic Mosier Tunnels

Three Sleeps Vineyards B&B has two beautiful rooms that overlook their mountain vineyard and the little valley in Mosier full of cherry trees and a Mt. Adams view.  Only 15 mins from the heart of the Columbia River Gorge and Hood River you’ll feel like you are miles from anywhere. Both rooms have private baths and patios and their own entrances.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Feller House

The Aurora Colony in Marion County, Oregon

The Aurora Colony in Marion County, Oregon, just south of Portland. Peacefully established in the mid-1800’s and located near the Oregon Wine Country, Aurora has a rich past and charming atmosphere.  It was founded as a religious commune in 1856 by Dr. William Keil who named it after his daughter.  The secret is out on this quaint village known as ‘Oregon’s antique capital’.

The 1860 farmhouse that is now the Feller House Bed and Breakfast is located in a beautiful country setting, minutes from Aurora.  Enjoy time away at this historic inn, built on Oregon’s famous French Prairie where hops became a cash crop in the 1860’s and still are today.  Conveniently located near the I-5 interstate and half way between Salem and Portland, you’ll find a warm and inviting atmosphere, two delightful guest rooms, a wholesome breakfast, and personal attention awaits you at the Feller House.

Old Aurora Colony Museum
The centerpiece of this National Historic District formed in 1974, their missions is to promote interactive lifelong learning by inspiring curiosity about the heritage of the Aurora Colony (1856-1883).  Visit the five-building complex of the 1862 Ox Barn, 1875 Steinbach Cabin, Summer Kitchen, 1864 Kraus House, and Tie Shed reproduction.  All furnished as they would have been during the colonial period.  Artifacts include furniture, tools, music instruments, clothing, textiles, spinning wheels, photos, samplers, quilts, and much more.  Learn the story of this German communal society and their travel from Missouri to the Oregon Territory to find a new Eden.

Aurora Colony Days, August 12, 13, 14

Aurora is celebrating its 160th anniversary this year and the Annual Aurora Colony Days promises to be a great family event.  Events scheduled are the Annual Art Show and Sale all three days,  a 1K Kid Fun Run/5k Run/Walk and pancake breakfast, Celebration in the Park concerts, family friendly beer garden, Antique and Vintage Street Fair on Saturday with many vendors displaying their wares for sale, and a chance to visit the Old Aurora Colony Museum and learn about the rich history of the town.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share Oregon, its environment, culture, and heritage with you.  Get to know our State like a local. Whether you’re looking for a quiet escape, a world class city experience, or a new spin on business travel,  you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance when staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Historic Covered Bridges

Oregon has the largest collection of historic covered bridges in the western part of the United States, with over 50 covered spans. These timber bridges were often covered to protect them from the weather. Now, the remaining examples of this obsolete bridge construction technology, generally located in pastoral rural settings, provide one of the most significant tourist attractions in the state.  Allow the Innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild to share local examples of Oregon History then take the road less traveled along Oregon’s Backroads.

** Can you guess which covered bridge is featured in the photo?  Answer at the end of this post.

The Innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild invite you to explore our historic destinations.  The heyday of covered bridge building in Oregon occurred between 1905 and 1925 when there were an  estimated 450 covered bridges in the state.  By 1977, this number had dwindled to 56.   All but one of these historic bridges can be found west of the Cascade Range.   The Swalley Canal, Rock O’ The Range, Covered Bridge is just north of Bend.  The others can be found in the Willamette Valley and west toward the Oregon Coast near many inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.  Plan our next authentic Geotourism adventure along the backroads of Oregon.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

** Goodpasture Bridge on the McKenzie River

Historic Bed and Breakfast

Historic Bed and Breakfast near Tillamook Oregon

The Historic Bed and Breakfast, Sandlake Country Inn, reflects an elegance and peace that is as timeless as the countryside that surrounds it.  On Christmas morning in 1890 one million board feet of virgin red fir bridge timbers washed ashore after a wooden full-rigger, The Struan, shipwrecked along the rugged Oregon Coast.

By 1894, his neighbor, W.C. King had collected enough of the 3″ x 12″ bridge timbers to construct a sturdy farmhouse on his homestead.  Everett & Nellie Allen bought it in 1907 and for 80 years the “Old Allen Place” stood the test of time with character.  Now on the Oregon Historic Registry, the innkeepers welcome you to Sandlake Country Inn.   The Inn’s Timbers Suite is the room that shows these timbers off the most.

Although the lumber from the Struan was available for the taking, collecting it was a daunting task. Using teams of draft animals and the high tides the timbers were hauled, rafted and floated as close as possible to building sites.

To discover more about vacationing at the award winning Sandlake Country Inn near Pacific City, OR, please visit the Area Attractions page or the Getaway pages on their website

For guests interested in the pioneers and history of the area, be sure to visit the Tillamook Pioneer Museum in downtown nearby Tillamook.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share with you their version of Oregon Culinary Tourism and Geotourism.  Get to know our State like a local; stay with one of our nearly 100 hosts in any one of our many regions. Experience romantic getaways, historic treasures, and tucked away rustic retreats.  Whether your trip is for a quiet escape to a quaint rural or coastal town, taking in Oregon Geotourism, for a World Class City experience, or for a new spin on business travel, you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance by staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Remembering Aurora Colonists

Remembering Aurora Colonists

Guest Blogger: Barb Mitchell from Feller House Bed and Breakfast

‘Our little town of Aurora is commemorating its 160th anniversary of its founding this year.   We thought it appropriate to remember the colonists and their craftsmanship by adding a barn quilt for our neighbors and passersby to enjoy.  The Aurora Colony members were known for their skill and craftsmanship and working together to complete community projects.  Each were known for their special skill and shared it with their community.  The colonists were descendants of old world craftsmen. Among the crafts they shared were furniture building, basket making, metal products and textiles including quilt making.

‘We patterned our design after an Aurora Colony quilt made in 1870, the Cookie Cutter quilt, which is now part of the Old Aurora Colony Museum’s collection. Our son drew up the stencils and painted the pattern on 4X4 sheet of plywood.  After being sealed it was placed on our barn.  Our plans are to build another for the barn’s other end so our incoming guests can see as they arrive.

‘Visit the Old Aurora Colony Museum’s new exhibit “Pieces of the Puzzle”which explores the rich history of Aurora and her French Prairie neighbors.  The original Feller family was among those neighbors.

‘We hope our neighbors, guests and passersby will enjoy our new addition as much as we will!’

Feller House in historic Aurora, Oregon, is a lovingly restored 1860’s farmhouse and the perfect place to enjoy time away. Tastefully decorated with appropriate antiques and lots of charm, this cozy B&B awaits guests. Rooms include private baths, comfy beds, handmade quilts, and warm robes. A full hearty breakfast is served with a gourmet touch.

Feller House has two guests rooms, each with a private bath, tastefully decorated and complete with cozy comforters, handmade quilts, fresh flowers and fruit.

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share with you their version of Oregon Culinary Tourism and Geotourism.  Get to know our State like a local; stay with one of our nearly 100 hosts in any one of our many regions. Experience romantic getaways, historic treasures, and tucked away rustic retreats.  Whether your trip is for a quiet escape to a quaint rural or coastal town, taking in Oregon Geotourism, for a World Class City experience, or for a new spin on business travel, you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance by staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

The Historic Columbia River Highway Celebrates 100 years in 2016

It’s that time of year again.  Time to start planning that Oregon Road Trip. Oregon has more designated scenic byways and tour routes than any other state.  The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is the only State B&B Association and a welcoming inn awaits you as you travel the backroads.  I am presenting a series of blogs to assist you in creating amazing getaways and tours in Oregon.  Thanks Travel Oregon for sharing this information

Historic Columbia River Highway Scenic Byway Map

Construction of the Historic Columbia River Highway began in 1913 and was considered one of the greatest engineering feats of the modern age.

As its name implies, the Byway is incredibly rich in cultural history.  This stretch of the Columbia once served as fishing and meeting grounds for the many indigenous peoples of the Columbia Basin.  Oregon Trail Pioneers also traveled down the Columbia in the mid 1800s.

When the highway first opened in 1916, Teddy Roosevelt praised its scenic grandeur and remarkable engineering. And The Illustrated London News went on to call it “the king of roads.” With its mossy stone walls and graceful viaducts winding past dozens of waterfalls, this All-American Road still reigns as one of the world’s most glorious drives.’

Start planning your road trip by booking a room at either a Portland or Mt Hood Region bed and breakfast of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild

The innkeepers of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild are ready to share with you their version of Oregon Culinary Tourism and Geotourism.  Get to know our State like a local; stay with one of our nearly 100 hosts in any one of or many regions. Experience romantic getaways, historic treasures, and tucked away rustic retreats.  Whether your trip is for a quiet escape to a quaint rural or coastal town, taking in Oregon Geotourism, for a World Class City experience, or for a new spin on business travel, you can be assured of combining gracious hospitality with ambiance by staying at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.