Tag Archives: oregon history

Historic Columbia River Highway

Historic Columbia River Highway

Traversing between Hood River and Mosier, the five mile section of the Historic Columbia River Highway passes through the Twin Tunnels and two climate zones. Being closed to auto traffic is an amazing trail for hikers, bikers, rollerbladers, anyone human powered. Starting at the east Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead near Mosier, the trail leads through semi-arid terrain dotted with ponderosa pine for about a mile until you reach the Twin Tunnels. There is an Earthcache nearby, Missoula Ice Age Floods at Mosier Syncline Flanks GC4T299, which shares information about nearby spectacular geologic formations that tell the story of the gorge’s creation.

After passing through the tunnels, you’ll emerge into a forest of fir trees and other common western Oregon plants and stunning views of the Columbia River Gorge. Viewpoints along the 3.5 mile segment from the tunnels to the west Mark O. Hatfield Trailhead overlook the river.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

The Historic Columbia River Highway

It’s that time of year again. Time to start planning that Oregon Road Trip. Oregon has more designated scenic byways and tour routes than any other state. The Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is the only State B&B Association and a welcoming inn awaits you as you travel the backroads. I am presenting a series of blogs to assist you in creating amazing getaways and tours in Oregon.  Thanks Travel Oregon for sharing this information

Historic Columbia River Highway Scenic Byway Map

Construction of the Historic Columbia River Highway began in 1913 and was considered one of the greatest engineering feats of the modern age.

As its name implies, the Byway is incredibly rich in cultural history.  This stretch of the Columbia once served as fishing and meeting grounds for the many indigenous peoples of the Columbia Basin.  Oregon Trail Pioneers also traveled down the Columbia in the mid 1800s.

When the highway first opened in 1916, Teddy Roosevelt praised its scenic grandeur and remarkable engineering. And The Illustrated London News went on to call it “the king of roads.” With its mossy stone walls and graceful viaducts winding past dozens of waterfalls, this All-American Road still reigns as one of the world’s most glorious drives.’

Start planning your road trip by booking a room at either a Portland or Mt Hood Region bed and breakfast of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Willamette Stone

The Willamette Stone was a small stone obelisk originally installed by the Department of Interior in 1885

The Willamette Stone Heritage Site is located in the west hills of Portland, Oregon.  The surveys completed from this location promoted settlement of the Northwest and began the transfer of land from government ownership to private ownership.

The first marker, placed in 1851, a simple cedar stake, was replaced with a small stone obelisk in 1885.  In 1945 the property was purchased to preserve and protect the origin point of the land survey system for Oregon and Washington. A stainless-steel marker, set into the original obelisk, was rededicated in 1988.

The Willamette Meridian is one of 37 principal meridians in the United States.  All land surveys and property descriptions in the states of Oregon and Washington are referenced at this point. The Willamette meridian runs north-south, and the Willamette baseline runs east-west through the marker.

The Willamette Valley marks the end of the Oregon Trail and the history of that migration can be discovered at heritage sites, museums, and cemeteries across the region. Known for its premium wines, craft breweries, cideries, meaderies and distilleries the Willamette Valley is also home to unique, one-of-a-kind Bed and Breakfasts awaiting your visit.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Oregon State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Small Camas
Small Camas

‘Dating back for six to ten thousand years before the arrival of Euro-American settlers, Kalapuya Indians lived in the Willamette Valley and relied upon on the valley’s oak groves as source of acorns and other food resources such as camas. The practice of following seasonal rounds to gather food and plant materials led the native people to recurrent camp grounds, one of which is believed to be the oak grove at the State Fairgrounds in Salem.

‘When the State Fair was established in 1862, visitors came in wagons and camped in the oak grove continuing the tradition of historic use. Camping at the Fair became an annual event and evolved into a system with streets and designated campsites. The first automobile arrived in camp in the early 1900’s and in 1910 there is a record of ten cars being in the camp. By 1922, it is estimated that at least 2,000 autos were on the grounds.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 75′-90′
  • Age: 200 years
  • Circumference: 20″-38″
  • Quercus garryana

Visit these trees

The Fairgrounds Oak Grove is located at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem on the west side of 17th Street across from the Jackman-Long Building.

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Moon Tree

Moon Tree is a young Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir, raised from a seed carried to the moon by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa in 1971.

I just love this story: Moon Tree – an Oregon Heritage Tree in the Oregon State Capital State Park

Moon Tree‘The story begins in 1953 when a man named Stuart Roosa, a native of Oklahoma, took a job as a US Forest Service smokejumper, a firefighter who would parachute into the wilderness to fight forest fires. Roosa came to love the forests of Oregon, a love that he would have the rest of his life. Later, Stuart Roosa became an Air Force test pilot and eventually returned to Oregon in the 1960s to train in the moon-scape like craters of Central Oregon.

‘He was destined to become an astronaut and was scheduled to fly on Apollo 14. In those days every Apollo astronaut was permitted to take a few small personal things into space with them. What they chose varied greatly. Alan Shepard chose golf balls, John Young on Gemini 3, took a corned beef sandwich. Stuart Roosa took tree seeds. This wasn’t just a publicity stunt; it was a science project too.  Scientists wanted to know what would happen to the seeds if they went to the Moon. Would they sprout when they came back? So when Apollo 14 launched in 1971, nearly 500 tree seeds of various species were tucked away in astronaut Roosa’s personal property kit. Roosa didn’t walk on the moon since he commanded the orbiting space module, but the tree seeds did orbit the moon 34 times.

‘Upon their return to earth, many seeds were propagated and the seedlings planted in celebration of America’s bicentennial. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others.

‘Unfortunately, adequate records were not maintained at the time, so we don’t know where all the moon trees were planted. Only about 50 of them are presently accounted for, including six planted in Oregon. I’m researching their locations.

Tree Facts

  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Approx. height: 63′
  • Age: 31 years
  • Circumference: 19″
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 2003

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Blue Atlas Cedar

The Blue Atlas Cedar in Carlton’s Ladd Park is over 100 years old.

Ladd Park was designed by Samuel Lancaster, architect of the Columbia River Highway and landscape architect. The Brooks Nursery donated plants and we can allow surmise that the Blue Atlas Cedar was part of the plant selection.

Blue Atlas CedarSarah Hall Ladd (1860-1927) was a renowned American landscape photographer of the Pacific NW. Her husband, Charles E. Ladd (1857-1920), was a businessman. The Ladd family businesses included the first bank in Portland, mills, railroads, ironworks, The Portland Hotel, and liquor. The Ladd District in Portland was an innovative master planned community and just a small part of the land the Ladd’s owned East and West of the Willamette.

In 1910 Sarah and her husband moved to Carlton. Sarah Ladd left $1500 in her estate to build a fountain in honor of her husband. And since the Ladd’s were important citizens of Carlton in the early 1900s, the most suitable location was found in the City Park which became Ladd Park.

Carlton, Oregon c1840

Carlton, Oregon, first settled by homesteaders in the 1840s, has a rich history of agriculture, logging, and, most recently, wine production.  Download the Walking Tour and explore the history of Carlton via a self-guided tour on your mobile device.

From R.R. Thompson House and The Carlton Inn explore dozens of small wineries, unique shops and wonderful restaurants in Carlton’s historic pioneer downtown. Lose oneself in the rich history of Oregon’s Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts. I’d be remiss if I did not mention Yamhill Vineyards Bed and Breakfast. About 7 miles from Carlton, the innkeeper suggested the Blue Atlas Cedar for our Majestic Oregon Trees series.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Eco Earth Globe In Salem Oregon

Happy Earth Day 2022

Riverfront Park in Salem, Oregon, is home to a number of annual events, including the World Beat Festival, 4th of July Celebration, Christmas tree lighting, and many various walk/run events. It is also home to the Eco Earth Globe, located at the southern portion of the park.

Story Behind the Globe


This sphere was originally a large pressurized tank used by Boise Cascade to hold acids that were used to “cook” wood chips into pulp. It was a 5-year process to transform this “acid ball” into a beautiful piece of art that includes 86,000 tiles depicting the entire globe, created by local artists and students, reflecting the diversity on land and water.

Eco-Earth Globe Restoration

After years of exposure to the elements, the Eco-Earth Globe began to lose tiles and show signs of disrepair. The Salem Parks Foundation has graciously stepped up to coordinate a community fundraising effort with a goal to raise $300,000 (of the $400,000 estimated total) for these repairs.

Story Behind Riverfront Park

The City of Salem bought this property from Boise Cascade and started clearing it during the 1980s. The 26-acres of existing parkland is the result of industrial land conversion. Paper, flour, and woolen mills, as well as a coal gasification plant and an auto junkyard formerly occupied the site. The Riverfront Carousel was added in 2001. The most recent addition to the park came in 2005, when the Salem Rotary Club, as their centennial project, raised funds and built an open-air pavilion in the park. In addition to the pavilion, the overlook and floating boat dock were also added in 2005. Not only is the dock home to the Willamette River Queen, but it can also accommodate canoes and kayaks while offering a beautiful view of the Willamette River.

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Parkdale Pine

Parkdale’s Ponderosa Pine in the Hood River Valley

Parkdale Ponderosa PineThis magnificent landmark on the north slope of Mt. Hood is estimated to be about 600 years old. If Columbus had come to Oregon in 1492 he would have seen this tree already growing into a vigorous young sapling. When measured in the year 2000 it was 21.5 feet in circumference, 8 feet in diameter and 168′ tall. You can see this tree from about anywhere in the valley as it towers over the acres and acres of fruit trees. It’s on the Halliday property about a half mile south of the Baseline Dr – Cooper Spur junction in Parkdale, Oregon.

The innkeepers at Parkdale’s Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast are working to get this tree recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree. We’ll keep you posted

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Willamette Mission Cottonwood

Willamette Mission Cottonwood – Populus trichocarpa

Willamette Mission Cottonwood‘This giant black cottonwood stands near the site of the Willamette Mission established by Reverend Jason Lee in 1834. At that time, the Mission and tree were located on the banks of the Willamette River. The great flood of 1861 changed the river course to its present channel, leaving what is now Mission Lake.

 

Willamette Mission CottonwoodThe Willamette Mission Cottonwood is the largest of its kind in Oregon and the nation.

Willamette Mission State Park is a gorgeous retreat for birdwatchers, horseback riders, disc golfers and kayakers. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the park marks the site of the original Willamette Mission, established in 1834 and washed away by flood in 1861. Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

  • Owens Cherry – Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853.
  • Champoeg State Heritage Area – where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place
  • Hoover-Minthorn Historic House – childhood home of Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States
  • Ewing Young Oak – ‘Ewing Young, fur trapper and trader in the Southwest and Mexico, turned settler in the Chehalem Valley in 1834.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they probably are.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak, numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family, and a large incense cedar that sheltered the family’s cattle at night and during foul weather. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Ellmaker Oak:
Age: 300+
Circumference: 178.4”
Height: 76
Crown spread: 97’

This magnificent grove of trees is a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognize our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.