Tag Archives: geotourism

Oregon Heritage Tree

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree? Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage.

These Trees Tell Stories

Oregon Heritage Trees‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

We spent the last couple of days exploring around Eugene, Oregon: chasing waterfalls, geocaches, covered bridges and Oregon Heritage Trees. We are aware of the need to travel to destinations that make it easy to maintain social distancing practices. Here in Oregon we’ve got your social distance travel needs covered.

Owen Cherry – 174 years in Eugene Oregon

Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853. By 1950 the site of the tree was owned by George Owen, a former Eugene City Councilor, lumberman, and philanthropist. Mr. Owen donated the site to the city. The Owen Rose Garden has more than 4,500 roses of over 400 varieties. The magnificent Owen Cherry was in spectacular spring bloom when we visited this past week.

Ellmaker Grove – Ellmaker Oak, Maple Row and Incense Cedar

The trees that make up the Ellmaker Grove include the 300-400 year old Ellmaker Oak and numerous large big leaf maples that were planted by the Ellmmaker family. Of particular historical significance was the proximity of the Ellmaker Ranch to the Applegate Trail. The Ellmakers planted a row of maple trees, which they called “Maple Row” leading from the wide Applegate Trail to their smithy.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: With guidance from the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon will again require masks in all indoor public spaces, that includes the inns of the Oregon B&B Guild. This measure is intended to slow the spread of the COVID-19 delta variant and went into effect Friday, Aug. 13. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Carlton Crush

Carlton Crush Puts the Focus (or the Feet) on Oregon Wine
Guest Blogger: Roselyn, innkeeper at R.R. Thompson House

Carlton Crush Harvest Festival has become one of the signature wine events in the north Willamette Valley. The 2021 Crush is scheduled for September 11th from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and features an array of exciting activities for young and old.

‘Watch as teams stomp on grapes, or sign up if you’re adventurous! The winning team will receive special prizes.  The Carlton Business Association (CBA) sponsors the Grape Stomp Competition with teams of four people each.  “Grapes are stomped in bare feet, in a half-barrel, with each team member stomping for one minute apiece.”  Visit Carlton Crush on the web and follow it on Facebook for updated posts.

‘Visitors and town folk not stomping can visit the Artists’ Market, listen to live music and enjoy food from Main Street restaurants or vendor booths. Crush has activities for kids as well. In addition to their own Grape Stomp, there will be a kids’ watermelon eating contest. All events are held in the Upper Park or downtown Carlton.

‘Jeff Lorton and Valerie Anctil, proprietors of Opus Desserts, originated the idea for Carlton Crush as fun event that would bring the wine industry and local community together and it has been a hugely successful event from its start in 2012.

The R. R. Thompson House is a five minute walk to the park and downtown Carlton. Choose from two spacious suites and three beautifully appointed rooms;  each has a private bath with jetted tub.  Book your two-night stay and spend a weekend in Wine Country! Free parking at the B & B and all over town, and no entrance fee to this event.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: With guidance from the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon will again require masks in some outdoor public spaces and all indoor public spaces, that includes the inns of the Oregon B&B Guild. This measure is intended to slow the spread of the COVID-19 delta variant and went into effect Friday, Aug. 13. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Lightship Columbia

Lightship Columbia is the last lightship serving the Pacific Coast

We shared with you ‘Best Hike in Oregon for History Buffs: Fort Stevens. This 4,300-acre park near Astoria, Oregon, is one of the nation’s largest campgrounds and a must-see destination for history buffs. It has much to offer, including beach-combing, a freshwater lake, trails, wildlife, and a historic shipwreck.

Also in Astoria is the Lightship Columbia, a 128-foot welded-steel lightship, built in 1950 for the U.S. Coast Guard. It was stationed at the mouth of the Columbia River near Cape Disappointment between 1951 and 1979. Retired in 1979, after 28 years of service the Lightship Columbia was sold to the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria in 1980. Lightship Columbia, is afloat, open to the public as part of museum admission. On December 20, 1989, the Lightship Columbia was added to the National Register of Historic Places as National Historic Landmark #89002463.

The Columbia River Maritime Museum has the largest collection of Pacific Northwest maritime artifacts in the country and works to preserve the rich maritime heritage of the entire Columbia River region. Exhibits take an exciting look at the legendary Columbia River entrance, where the forces of the mighty Columbia River and Pacific Ocean meet to create one of the most dangerous bar crossings on the planet.

There have been approximately 114 vessels wrecked, stranded, sunk in collisions, or capsized in the Columbia River estuary, on the nearby beaches or at sea within a few miles of the entrance giving it the name “Graveyard of the Pacific. Here, waves can exceed 40 feet in height during the most severe winter storms. This museum is one of the country’s finest displays about shipwrecks, lighthouses, fishing, navigation and naval history.

Guests visiting the Oregon Coast and our Oregon Coast bed and breakfasts enjoy hiking, biking, kayaking the rivers trails, paths and surf. Over 600 Victorian homes are tucked away throughout Astoria along with museums, galleries, antique shops and small intimate gift shops and fine restaurants.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: With guidance from the Oregon Health Authority, Oregon will again require masks in all indoor public spaces, that includes the inns of the Oregon B&B Guild. This measure is intended to slow the spread of the COVID-19 delta variant and goes into effect Friday, Aug. 13. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

The Clock is Ticking on these Deals

Roseburg is Magic on the Oregon Mural Trail

Roseburg is MagicThe Umpqua Valley’s largest city, Roseburg, is an inviting destination for arts and culture and off jumping-off point for adventures. The Wild and Scenic North Umpqua River is just minutes away, where fly fishers cast lines. Along the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, known as a highway of waterfalls, visitors can encounter more than 15 dazzling cascades.

Take a downtown walking tour to learn about the historic Applegate Trail and the 1959 Roseburg Blast. The Douglas County Museum illuminates thousands of years of natural and cultural history. For another glimpse into the past, visit the nearby covered bridges nearby. Foodies will love the eateries in Roseburg and the valley’s long winemaking tradition dating back more than a century. Major Oregon attractions are an easy drive away as is iconic Crater Lake National Park. At the end of a full day rest beneath the great spreading crown of the Courthouse Elm, an Oregon Heritage Tree.

C.H. Bailey House is nestled in Southern Oregon’s Umpqua Valley wine country. It’s Brenner Suite is a private luxurious “green” bungalow with a kitchen, queen-sized bed with luxurious linens, bathroom with walk-in shower, living room with gas fireplace, walk-in closet. Complimentary local wine and beer, and breakfast is included in the ADA accessible suite.

The captivating artwork of the Oregon Mural Trail are proudly hand-painted on walls in Oregon where the illustrations represent the destinations. Let the Oregon Mural Trail inspire you to get outside and experience the wonders of each community. Take photos of the murals and use the hashtag #OregonIsMagic in social posts to share the love.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: We all may be a little rusty, and a little leery, on planning trips just yet. And while it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, we’re ready when you are! Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe and welcome you back. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregon

The Courthouse Elm ‘was given to Douglas County by Binger Hermann. Hermann served in the U.S. Congress from 1885 until 1897, and again from 1903 until 1907. During the intervening years, he was Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, D.C. The Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregonoccasion for the tree donation is not known positively, but research suggests that it was planted very near the turn of the century, possibly at a dedication ceremony for courthouse, which was rebuilt after a fire on December 7, 1898.

‘In addition to its heritage, the tree gives much pleasure to local residents with its great spreading crown and huge supporting limb structure.’ Oregon Travel Information Council

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Take a few days, explore Oregon and the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild in Southern Oregon

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

4T

4Ts and some Oregon B&Bs

When I overheard our Portland guests suggesting the 4T Trail in Portland to our Portland bound Minnesota guests I was all ears. We had to go into Portland so after a bit of research on the trail we headed out Monday morning. Our Plan: Drive the hour and a half into Portland, do the 4T Trail then run errands, mixing adventure with necessity.

Washington Park is the crown jewel of Portland. This 410-acre park is home to the Oregon Zoo, World Forestry Center, Portland Children’s Museum, Hoyt Arboretum, International Rose Test Garden, and the Portland Japanese Garden.

Our hike started at the parking lot of the Washington Park Max Station at the Oregon Zoo.

The Trail section takes you through the thick forests of the West Hills, to Portland’s highest point, Council Crest, and on into OHSU. Oregon Health and Science University has a campus on the hills overlooking Portland and the Cascade Range. In 2006 a Tram was built to connect OSHU and the Waterfront and it has become quite a tourist destination. Take the tram down to the waterfront, disembark and walk about 50 steps and catch the Portland Trolley to downtown. Then the Train (Max) back to your car. There you have the 4 Ts.

One can begin the loop at any point and the trail is marked numerous places, even downtown. Since we hiked the trail first, we arrived downtown in time for lunch and a gelato, with plenty of time to stroll, before heading taking the Train back to our car.

This is one of many urban hikes in Portland. Combine one of these with an Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member in either the Portland or Willamette Valley region and take the short drive to the Washington Park Max Station.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has updated mask wearing protocol and some inns may still be requiring masks to be worn in some situations. Please check with individual B&Bs to inquire about their specific policies. 

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of our individual counties, inns and businesses. Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Giant Spruce of Cape Perpetua on the Oregon Coast. Oregon Heritage Trees tell the Oregon Story.

Giant Spruce of Cape PerpetuaHalf a century before Christopher Columbus sailed to the America’s, a tiny Sitka spruce began its life nourished by a nurse log on the Oregon coast. Today, it is the largest and oldest tree in the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area of the Siuslaw National Forest. Nearly 600 years old, it stands over 185 feet tall and has a circumference of 40 feet.

Nearby the tree, indigenous people dwelled at the mouth of Cape Creek for 1500 years. In the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps established a camp here and built the first trail to the tree, probably opening up an ancient Indian trail.

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

It’s possible to drive the entire Pacific Coast Scenic Byway in a single day. But why would you when you have 6 member inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild from Cannon Beach to Port Orford?  Take a few days, explore Oregon and the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Sitka Spruce

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

Sitka Spruce ‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

The Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

‘This Sitka Spruce was the first tree to be designated an official Oregon Heritage Tree and was once the biggest tree in Oregon and the National Co-Champion Sitka Spruce. It germinated from a seed on the forest floor around the time of the signing of the Magna Carta in 1215 and grew to its mature height about the time Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world. A legacy of the primeval coastal old growth rain forests of the Pacific Northwest, it was also remarkable for being bypassed for logging when spruce was in high demand for building military aircraft, but it was considered to have too many limbs to meet the standards of the national aircraft board.

‘Sadly, this once magnificent tree suffered severe damage on December 2, 2007 when hurricane force winds snapped the tree about 80 feet above ground along an old lightening scar. The top portion shattered as it hit the ground.’

Visit the Sitka Spruce at Klootchy Creek

This tree is located on US Highway 26 in Klootchy Creek County Park. Visit it on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: We all may be a little rusty, and a little leery, on planning trips just yet. And while it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, we’re ready when you are! Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe and welcome you back. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest

Four County PointWe all know the another Four Corners in America that is a big-time tourist destination. That would be the only place where four state boundaries meet: Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona.

In Oregon, our Four County Point in the Tillamook State Forest notes the meeting of Clatsop, Columbia, Washington and Tillamook counties. A stone sunk into the Coast Range forest, not far off U.S. 26, marks the only place in Oregon where four county points meet.

Hike the Four County Point Trail

Four County Point is located on US Highway 26 and we invite you to take a moderate 1 mile hike hike through a Douglas Fir Forest on your way to the Oregon Coast from a Willamette Valley or Portland bed and breakfast. Or a reversed trip: from a Coast bed and breakfast inland.

Bonus: and for those searching geocaches – 4 – Corners Oregon geocache GCAD7A

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: We all may be a little rusty, and a little leery, on planning trips just yet. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, we’re ready when you are! Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe and welcome you back. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

join-the-movement-and-bookdirect

Join the Movement and BookDirect with Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild

Join the Movement and BookDirect with an Oregon Bed and Breakfast member inn. Book > Direct is a reservation platform where you, the traveler, while visiting our association site, can book directly with our inns, no middle man. Just put in your dates and select other filters. You’ll see our member properties that have availability on those dates including rates. Select an inn and go directly to the inn’s booking engine to complete your booking.

There are many great reasons why booking direct is beneficial for both the innkeeper and the guest.

  • You are always guaranteed the lowest pricing available. An OTA (online travel agent) may be able to influence the price to get you to book but there is little they can do to improve your stay. Support your local businesses and #bookdirect!  You save on your getaway, receive personalized service and the business saves on steep commissions – it’s a win win
  • The truth is, these booking sites charge at least 15% of each booking to the small business owner and sometimes charge you a ‘service fee’  The independent innkeeper really appreciates it when you book directly with them through their website
  • You work directly with the property in case of changes, delays, or cancellations
  • You typically will not have to pay additional booking, change, or cancellation fees.
  • You will enjoy exclusive benefits and can take advantage of special deals, amenities, and packages
  • Innkeepers know their properties and the area better than anyone. If you have a specific need or wants more detailed information about a property, you’ll be able to communicate with our hosts directly who are well acquainted and who are well-equipped to address your needs.

Another great reason to book direct is because you will always have direct access to our innkeepers. There is no middle man. If a guest has a specific need or wants more detailed information about a property, you’ll be able to communicate with our hosts directly who are well acquainted with our locations and who are well-equipped to address your needs. As a privately owned small business we have the power to offer our guest world-class customer service via our staff and our business.

When you commit to Book>Direct, you will enjoy many perks and amenities that you would not have access to when booking through a travel agency.  Not to mention, you will almost always pay less!

As small business owners our innkeepers truly appreciate your direct bookings. This not only allows you a more specialized experience as you interact directly with us, you also benefit the local economy. How can you, the traveler Join the Movement and make sure you’re always booking direct?

Always verify you are on the bed and breakfast’s website before you book. When in doubt, call the Inn for assistance. Be careful using the blue Book a Room button in Google. It NEVER goes directly to the hotel website. It ALWAYS goes to an online travel agency such as Booking.com or Expedia, or one of their downstream booking partners

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: We all may be a little rusty, and a little leery, on planning trips just yet. And while it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, we’re ready when you are! Our inns have been proactively doing everything in our power to keep you safe and welcome you back. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.