Tag Archives: oregon heritage tree

Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregon

The Courthouse Elm ‘was given to Douglas County by Binger Hermann. Hermann served in the U.S. Congress from 1885 until 1897, and again from 1903 until 1907. During the intervening years, he was Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, D.C. The Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregonoccasion for the tree donation is not known positively, but research suggests that it was planted very near the turn of the century, possibly at a dedication ceremony for courthouse, which was rebuilt after a fire on December 7, 1898.

‘In addition to its heritage, the tree gives much pleasure to local residents with its great spreading crown and huge supporting limb structure.’ Oregon Travel Information Council

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Take a few days, explore Oregon and the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild in Southern Oregon

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Giant Spruce of Cape Perpetua on the Oregon Coast. Oregon Heritage Trees tell the Oregon Story.

Giant Spruce of Cape PerpetuaHalf a century before Christopher Columbus sailed to the America’s, a tiny Sitka spruce began its life nourished by a nurse log on the Oregon coast. Today, it is the largest and oldest tree in the Cape Perpetua Scenic Area of the Siuslaw National Forest. Nearly 600 years old, it stands over 185 feet tall and has a circumference of 40 feet.

Nearby the tree, indigenous people dwelled at the mouth of Cape Creek for 1500 years. In the 1930’s the Civilian Conservation Corps established a camp here and built the first trail to the tree, probably opening up an ancient Indian trail.

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

It’s possible to drive the entire Pacific Coast Scenic Byway in a single day. But why would you when you have 6 member inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild from Cannon Beach to Port Orford?  Take a few days, explore Oregon and the inns of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train it’s still a little scary but we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Octopus Tree Heritage Tree

Octopus Tree in the Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge

Octopus Tree Heritage TreeThe forces that shaped this unique Sitka spruce, Picea sitschensis, have been debated for many years. Whether natural events or possibly Native Americans were the cause remains a mystery.

The tree measures more than 14 feet across at its base and has no central trunk. Instead, limbs extend horizontally as much as 30 feet before turning upward. It is 105 feet tall and is estimated to be around 250 years old.

What does it take for a tree to be recognized as an Oregon Heritage Tree?

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Bonus: for those searching geocaches – Picea Sitchensis Octopoda GC3M4NX

The largest Sitka Spruce in Oregon can be found less than a mile away. Follow the Big Spruce Trail to behold this awesome 800 year Oregon Champion Tree. Bonus: Great Grandma Tree GC1KP5Q

Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge is a short drive from Oceanside Oregon, a cozy little hideaway located just off the Three Capes Scenic Route. Built upon a hillside overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Oceanside offers the ambiance of a quaint European Village.

At Thyme and Tide Bed and Breakfast in Oceanside fall asleep to the sound of the surf and wake up to a delicious hot breakfast.

Also in Oceanside: turtlejanes bed and breakfast offers two beautifully appointed bedrooms with spectacular views, king-size beds, private bathrooms with heated floors, and blackout shades on the windows.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Things are looking up. The CDC has lifted the mask mandate and Oregon will be following this guidance, which applies to fully vaccinated individuals. That means Oregonians and our guests who are fully vaccinated no longer need to wear masks or social distance in most public spaces.

Let’s all be respectful and safe. While it’s almost safe enough to climb aboard that travel train, it’s still a little scary, we’re ready when you are! Our inns will continue to do everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.