Tag Archives: oregon heritage tree

Grand Fir

Grand Fir at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast

Grand Fir

The Grand Fir at the Old Parkdale Inn Bed and Breakfast, Abies grandis, was planted in front of  Charles and Lillian Craven’s new home in 1910. The Craven House was built in the fertile valley on the north slope of Mt. Hood. The home was converted into a bed and breakfast in 1998

Tree Facts

Grand Fir
  • Approx. height: 140′
  • Age: 112 years
  • Circumference: 15′
  • Abies grandis

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ve recognized some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month.

Hope you’ve enjoyed learning about the history of these trees and their contribution to our Oregon History and Culture.

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild took the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. We won’t stop here. So many more Oregon Heritage Trees we’ll be out and about searching for more Many of the trees we highlighted, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Oregon State Fairgrounds Oak Grove

Small Camas
Small Camas

‘Dating back for six to ten thousand years before the arrival of Euro-American settlers, Kalapuya Indians lived in the Willamette Valley and relied upon on the valley’s oak groves as source of acorns and other food resources such as camas. The practice of following seasonal rounds to gather food and plant materials led the native people to recurrent camp grounds, one of which is believed to be the oak grove at the State Fairgrounds in Salem.

‘When the State Fair was established in 1862, visitors came in wagons and camped in the oak grove continuing the tradition of historic use. Camping at the Fair became an annual event and evolved into a system with streets and designated campsites. The first automobile arrived in camp in the early 1900’s and in 1910 there is a record of ten cars being in the camp. By 1922, it is estimated that at least 2,000 autos were on the grounds.

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 75′-90′
  • Age: 200 years
  • Circumference: 20″-38″
  • Quercus garryana

Visit these trees

The Fairgrounds Oak Grove is located at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem on the west side of 17th Street across from the Jackman-Long Building.

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple

Governor McCall Maple‘This Greenleaf Japanese Maple was planted by Governor Tom McCall in late 1973 or early 1974 during his second term of office. McCall is remembered for many environmental achievements, such as the “Beach Bill” which granted the state government the power to zone Oregon’s beaches, thus protecting them from private development, and the “Bottle Bill” which was the nation’s first mandatory bottle-deposit law, designed to decrease litter in Oregon.’

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 38′
  • Planted in: 1973
  • Circumference: 37″
  • Crown: 32′
  • Acer palmatum

Visit this tree

State Capital State Park, Salem

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

This black walnut, was planted by the Zimmerman family sometime around 1884. The Zimmerman’s were prominent members of the Aurora Colony, a religious community led by Dr. William Keil, that immigrated to this location from Bethel, Missouri. David Zimmerman was a carpenter and most likely planted the tree and others like it, for its valuable hardwood.

Aurora Colony Black Walnut

Aurora Colony Black Walnut
(Juglans nigra)

Location: Corner of Liberty @ 3rd Street, Aurora, OR
Circumference: 18 feet
Height: 70 feet (plus)
Crown Spread: 60 feet
Age: 130 years

Visit Oregon’s Pioneer Past – A 19th century Oregon Communal Society

The Aurora Colony members were known for their skill and craftsmanship and working together to complete community projects. Each were known for their special skill and shared it with their community. The colonists were descendants of old world craftsmen. Among the crafts they shared were furniture building, basket making, metal products and textiles including quilt making.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Moon Tree

Moon Tree is a young Rocky Mountain Douglas Fir, raised from a seed carried to the moon by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa in 1971.

I just love this story: Moon Tree – an Oregon Heritage Tree in the Oregon State Capital State Park

Moon Tree‘The story begins in 1953 when a man named Stuart Roosa, a native of Oklahoma, took a job as a US Forest Service smokejumper, a firefighter who would parachute into the wilderness to fight forest fires. Roosa came to love the forests of Oregon, a love that he would have the rest of his life. Later, Stuart Roosa became an Air Force test pilot and eventually returned to Oregon in the 1960s to train in the moon-scape like craters of Central Oregon.

‘He was destined to become an astronaut and was scheduled to fly on Apollo 14. In those days every Apollo astronaut was permitted to take a few small personal things into space with them. What they chose varied greatly. Alan Shepard chose golf balls, John Young on Gemini 3, took a corned beef sandwich. Stuart Roosa took tree seeds. This wasn’t just a publicity stunt; it was a science project too.  Scientists wanted to know what would happen to the seeds if they went to the Moon. Would they sprout when they came back? So when Apollo 14 launched in 1971, nearly 500 tree seeds of various species were tucked away in astronaut Roosa’s personal property kit. Roosa didn’t walk on the moon since he commanded the orbiting space module, but the tree seeds did orbit the moon 34 times.

‘Upon their return to earth, many seeds were propagated and the seedlings planted in celebration of America’s bicentennial. A Loblolly Pine was planted at the White House, and trees were planted in Brazil, Switzerland, and presented to the Emperor of Japan, among others.

‘Unfortunately, adequate records were not maintained at the time, so we don’t know where all the moon trees were planted. Only about 50 of them are presently accounted for, including six planted in Oregon. I’m researching their locations.

Tree Facts

  • Pseudotsuga menziesii
  • Approx. height: 63′
  • Age: 31 years
  • Circumference: 19″
  • Dedicated on: April 11, 2003

Visit Salem and the Willamette Valley Bed and Breakfasts of the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild. Plan a few days to explore the beautiful Riverfront Park, the state capitol, museums, and other historic sites well worth seeing. With over 40 city parks, Salem also has plenty of open space especially near the Willamette River.

Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregon

The Courthouse Elm ‘was given to Douglas County by Binger Hermann. Hermann served in the U.S. Congress from 1885 until 1897, and again from 1903 until 1907. During the intervening years, he was Commissioner of the General Land Office in Washington, D.C.

The Courthouse Elm in Roseburg Oregonoccasion for the tree donation is not known positively, but research suggests that it was planted very near the turn of the century, possibly at a dedication ceremony for courthouse, which was rebuilt after a fire on December 7, 1898.

‘In addition to its heritage, the tree gives much pleasure to local residents with its great spreading crown and huge supporting limb structure.’ Oregon Travel Information Council

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 71′
  • Planted in: Approx. 1900
  • Circumference: 13′ 4″
  • Dedicated on: April 6, 1999
  • Crown: 103′

This Oregon Heritage Tree is a scenic drive away from C.H. Bailey House, a Roseburg Bed and Breakfast.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Huntington Wagon Road Junipers

Following the line of a very old Native American Trail, the Huntington Wagon Road was marked by J.W. Petit Huntington in 1864 as a route between The Dalles and Fort Klamath.

When the road was firmly established, it was used by prospectors, homesteaders, soldiers, and tradesman. Warm Springs Indian scouts frequently used the road in skirmishes with the Paiutes between 1865 and 1867. Heavy wagon-use along the road created deep ruts that are still visible today. Much of the original road later became OR Hwy 97—the main north to south arterial route through Central Oregon.

Three blazed Junipers are included in the Heritage grove. These craggy notched trees, marking the trail, range from approximately 25-feet to 32-feet and boast girths measuring from just under seven feet to nearly 11 feet.

Species: Juniperous occidentalis
Age: Unknown, several hundred years
Circumference: Approx. 90″
Height: from 25′ to 33′

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself.

Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Pinus ponderosa – Big Tree – The Biggest Ponderosa Pine ever Recorded

This majestic pine is the biggest of its species ever recorded. It was a giant before the Oregon Territory was established, enduring centuries of fire, insects, disease, and human impact. Recently half of its crown was lost to weather, making another Ponderosa pine taller, but “Big Tree” remains the largest in circumference.

Tree facts

  • Approx. height: 162
  • Approximate Age: 500 years
  • Circumference: 28′ 11″

Visit this tree

It is located in La Pine State Park, about 5 miles west of US Highway 97, 27 miles south of Bend.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We recognize that there will be mixed feelings about this change. We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of a person’s individual decision to wear a mask or not, and most importantly kind to yourself. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn  is open? Give them a call as they just might be.

Willamette Mission Cottonwood

Willamette Mission Cottonwood – Populus trichocarpa

Willamette Mission Cottonwood‘This giant black cottonwood stands near the site of the Willamette Mission established by Reverend Jason Lee in 1834. At that time, the Mission and tree were located on the banks of the Willamette River. The great flood of 1861 changed the river course to its present channel, leaving what is now Mission Lake.

 

Willamette Mission CottonwoodThe Willamette Mission Cottonwood is the largest of its kind in Oregon and the nation.

Willamette Mission State Park is a gorgeous retreat for birdwatchers, horseback riders, disc golfers and kayakers. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the park marks the site of the original Willamette Mission, established in 1834 and washed away by flood in 1861. Lose oneself in Oregon’s rich history in the Willamette Valley on a scenic day trip from our Willamette Valley bed and breakfasts.

  • Owens Cherry – Folklore is the Owen Cherry tree, featured picture, was planted in 1847 by Eugene Skinner, co-founder of the City of Eugene in 1853.
  • Champoeg State Heritage Area – where the vote for a Provisional Government in Oregon took place
  • Hoover-Minthorn Historic House – childhood home of Herbert Hoover, 31st president of the United States
  • Ewing Young Oak – ‘Ewing Young, fur trapper and trader in the Southwest and Mexico, turned settler in the Chehalem Valley in 1834.

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees – Trees that Tell an Historic Story

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they probably are.

Octopus Tree Heritage Tree

Octopus Tree in the Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge

Octopus Tree Heritage Tree‘The forces that shaped this unique Sitka spruce, Picea sitschensis, have been debated for many years. Whether natural events or possibly Native Americans were the cause remains a mystery.

‘The tree measures more than 14 feet across at its base and has no central trunk. Instead, limbs extend horizontally as much as 30 feet before turning upward. It is 105 feet tall and is estimated to be around 250 years old.”

Tree Facts

  • Approx. height: 105′
  • Age: approx. 250 years
  • Circumference: 46′ 7″
  • Dedicated On: October 23, 2009
  • Crown: 92′

April celebrates Arbor Day and Earth Day and we’ll recognize some Magnificent Oregon Trees all month

Arbor Day, much like Earth Day, is a holiday that celebrates nature. Its purpose is to encourage people to plant trees and this year the Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild will take the opportunity to recognizes our unique, magnificent trees throughout the month of April. Many of these trees, but not all, have been recognized as Oregon Heritage Trees.

Oregon Heritage Trees

Oregon has a vast amount of ancient trees across the state that are reminders of not only the their longevity but as their importance to the environment and our Oregon Heritage. Many have been recognize by the Oregon Travel Information Council in their Oregon Heritage Tree program.

These Trees Tell Stories

‘Honored groves, single trees or groups of trees have something in common with one another no matter what the species: they are trees that tell a story; trees that confound and astound; trees that educate both Oregonians and visitors about significant people or events from the past; trees that have survived natural disasters or stand as silent sentries to the passage of time. And that’s only a small part of what makes an Oregon Heritage Tree compelling.’

Bonus: for those searching geocaches – Picea Sitchensis Octopoda GC3M4NX

The largest Sitka Spruce in Oregon can be found less than a mile away. Follow the Big Spruce Trail to behold this awesome 800 year Oregon Champion Tree. Bonus: Great Grandma Tree GC1KP5Q

Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge is a short drive from Oceanside Oregon, a cozy little hideaway located just off the Three Capes Scenic Route. Built upon a hillside overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Oceanside offers the ambiance of a quaint European Village.

At Thyme and Tide Bed and Breakfast in Oceanside fall asleep to the sound of the surf and wake up to a delicious hot breakfast.

Also in Oceanside: turtlejanes bed and breakfast offers two beautifully appointed bedrooms with spectacular views, king-size beds, private bathrooms with heated floors, and blackout shades on the windows.

Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild is ready to share Oregon with you: it’s environment, culture, and heritage. Combine gracious hospitality with ambiance at an inspected and approved Oregon Bed and Breakfast Guild member Inn.

Hospitality Update: Our inns are following COVID-19 protocol guidance from the Oregon Health Authority. Oregon’s statewide mask requirement for indoor public places was lifted on March 12.

After mask guidelines are lifted:

● Some businesses may choose to still require masks.

● Some people may choose to still wear a mask.

We have all struggled through COVID-19 and could use a little kindness. Please be respectful of local businesses and their workers and most importantly kind to yourself.

Let’s all be respectful and safe and follow the guidance of the CDC. Our inns are doing everything in our power to keep you safe. Not sure if your favorite inn is open? Give them a call as they just might be.